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The Godfather: The Lost Years Kindle Edition

176 customer reviews

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Length: 676 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews


"He (Winegardner) has done an excellent job and, though he is standing on the shoulders of a giant, The Lost Years is in some respects an improvement on its model" The Telegraph "The Godfather Returns is not only a real book by a real writer. It's also a real pleasure, a fine, swirling epic - bitter, touching, funny and true ... Winegardner has not squandered his inheritance" New York Times Book Review "The measure of his success is quickly apparent ... he brilliantly recreates the vivid, pungent prose style of Puzo's original" Daily Express

About the Author

Mark Winegardner is the author of two acclaimed novels: The Veracruz Blues and Crooked River Burning.

Product Details

  • File Size: 1342 KB
  • Print Length: 676 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1409049612
  • Publisher: Cornerstone Digital (October 31, 2010)
  • Publication Date: October 31, 2010
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0045JKES0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #974,456 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Mark Winegardner was born and raised in Bryan, Ohio, near Exit 2, a town of 8,000 which supplies the world with its Dum-Dum suckers and Etch-a-Sketches. His parents owned an RV dealership there, and every summer he traveled with his family across the USA in various travel trailers and motorhomes. By the time he was 15, he had been in all 48 contiguous states. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa and magna cum laude from Miami University and went on to receive a master of fine arts degree in fiction writing from George Mason University. He published his first book at age 26, while still in graduate school. He has taught at Miami, George Mason, George Washington, and John Carroll Universities, and is now a professor in the creative writing program at Florida State University in Tallahassee, Florida.

Winegardner has won grants, fellowships and residencies from the Ohio Arts Council, the Lilly Endowment, the Ragdale Foundation, the Sewanee Writers Conference and the Corporation of Yaddo. His books have been chosen as among the best of the year by the New York Times Book Review, Chicago Sun-Times, Los Angeles Times, the New York Public Library, and USA Today. His work has appeared in GQ, Playboy, Ploughshares, TriQuarterly, DoubleTake, Family Circle, The Sporting News, Witness, Story Quarterly, American Short Fiction, Ladies Home Journal, Parents and The New York Times Magazine. Several of his stories have been chosen as Distinguished Stories of the Year in The Best American Short Stories.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

69 of 79 people found the following review helpful By Brian in LA on December 30, 2004
Format: Hardcover
After having been first excited and then disappointed by Godfather III, I approached this book with what I thought was a healthy dose of skepticism. The dose was not healthy enough.

By page 7, Winegardner has already stolen from Goodfellas when describing how Ace Geraci (Winegardner's creation) took over legitimate businesses and used them to have deliveries "stream through the front door and go straight out the back." And then when the bills came to the business, Geraci torches the business. This is almost exactly what happened to the bar in which Henry Hill and his cohorts took an interest.

I should have stopped reading then, but I didn't.

As some other reviewers have written, the "explanation" of Fredo is simply absurd. Had Winegardner ever read The Godfather or seen any of the movies? Nothing in any of the previous works even hints at Fredo being gay or dabbling in acting. Also with "the new and improved" Fredo, we find yet another bit of pilfering from a Scorsese/Pileggi collaboration. Winegardner has Fredo host his own television show from the Corleone's casino in Las Vegas. Didn't we already see that with Ace Rothstein in Casino? Lastly re Fredo, what's the big deal with the cemetery scheme? This is the big explanation as to why he betrayed Michael? Please.

And speaking of "please," Congressman Tom Hagen? Why? Again, why? Where on earth did this come from? Wouldn't someone have made a passing remark about this in either of the last two films? Why put this in? It makes zero sense.

Winegardner also wields his pen to bring the dead back to life, and for what reason, I cannot understand. At the end of The Godfather, Michael clearly has eliminated the other heads of the Five Families.
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47 of 57 people found the following review helpful By Benjamin M. Miller on January 4, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I would give this less than one star if I could.

I was torn when I first saw this book. On the one hand, Mario Puzo wrote a master piece and another author should not just ride his coat tails. But I saw that Winegardner had written a number of other books, and figured he handled this task with the necessary class and research to write the book properly.

Unfortunately I was wrong.

A minor detail, in his acknowledgments he does not even acknowledge Puzo. Also, I found myself wondering when I was on page 300, where was this going. The author had not really developed a new story of any kind. He seemed to be obsessed with sex, and added it to the story when it did not have to be there. Fredo for some reason has become gay, even though his affection for waitresses is well known from the first movie.

Most offensive there are a number of discrepencies between Winegardner's book and Mario Puzo's and the movies. All are minor but in writing such a book, the author should know the movies and the book inside and out. Winegardner did not.

I will admit that I did not finish reading the book. Around page 330 or so, I threw the book across the room in disgust. Winegardner had decided to write that Kay really did not have an abortion, that it was a miscarriage. This was the last straw for me. Winegardner decided to take one of the most powerful scenes from the movie and change it. I could not accept this and had finally had enough.

This is a lazy effort by Winegardner. He throws in a lot of new names and adds plots with Cleveland, Chicago, LA, but never really lets us know any of these new characters or plots. He throws in a lot of lines from the movies, and it is always akward.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By nom-de-nick on January 4, 2005
Format: Hardcover
While Godfather Returns isn't a useless book by any means, it's not a great one either. Don't misunderstand; it's an OK read that keeps you turning the pages (albeit a little slowly). The writing isn't bad, and while the story jumps around a bit, it's definitely followable. And some of the small allusions to various events in the original book/films were pretty well done.

The problem is one any author would have to seriously consider at the outset; if you're going to write a continuation or fill-in on something as permanently embedded into the American film and book psyche as The Godfather, you need to be absolutely, positively dead-on certain on each and every detail, or you'll instantly lose credibility. You also need to try to channel ahead a bit to see if plot changes, additions or twists are really necessary to the story as a whole (story meaning the entire GF saga). To that end, Winegardner slips several times. First off, and to rehash a little what others have said, missing details such as where Michael went to school or where he shot McClusky or the fact that Michael WAS indeed already born when Vito shot Fanucci or Francesca marrying another boy, or the fact that Frank Pentangeli was altogether left out, as was one of Connie's fiances, may SEEM insignificant, but they're really not. They're crucial to the entire story remaining intact. To miss such points shows, at best, carelessness on the author's and/or editor's part and at worst, a lack of respect for the existing works. Let's not even discuss Kay's "miscarriage" or the fact that two Dons killed at the end of GF One were suddenly alive again. That was just plain sloppy. (And to quickly correct what one reviewer said, the book was NOT just a continuation of the Godfather book, but the films, too.
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