The Golden Ass (Penguin Classics) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.00
  • Save: $2.56 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: pages are clean easy to read ships fast with tracking cover has minor wear some writing or highlighting but easy to read,
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Golden Ass (Penguin Classics) Paperback – January 1, 1999


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.44
$7.79 $3.37


Frequently Bought Together

The Golden Ass (Penguin Classics) + Roman Lives: Ancient Roman Life Illustrated by Latin Inscriptions (Focus Classical Sources) + Daily Life in the Roman City: Rome, Pompeii, and Ostia
Price for all three: $45.86

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Bone Clocks
David Mitchell's hypnotic new novel crackles with invention and sheer storytelling pleasure. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Penguin Classics
  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics (January 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140435905
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140435900
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #48,823 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

WARNING:
CHOKING HAZARD -- Toy contains a small ball. Not for children under 3 yrs.

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Apuleius was born about AD 125 in Madaura or Madauros (moden Mdaurusch), a Roman colony in the North African province of Numidia. His father, from whom he inherited a substantial fortune, was one of the two chief magistrates (duouiri) of the city. For his education Apuleius was sent first to Carthage, the capital of roman North Africa, and then to Athens. During his time abroad he traveled widely, spending some time in Rome, where he practiced as a pleader in the courts. While detained by illness on his way home at Oea in Tripoli, he met and married the wealthy widow Pudentilla. This was at the instance of one of her sons, whome he had known at Rome; but other members of her family objected and prosecuted Apuleius on various charges, principally that of winning Pudentilla's affections by magic. Their accuations were brilliantly and it would seem successfully rebutted by Apuleius in his Apology, delivered in or shortly before AD 160. He appears to have spent the rest of his life in Carthage, where he became a notable public figure, holding the chief priesthood of the province and honoured with a statue. His contemporary reputation rested on his neo-Platonic philosophical writings, of which the most important that survive are On the God of Socrates (De de Socratis) and On Plato and His Doctrine (De Platone et eius dogmate), and on his oratory, of which we have excerpted speciments in his Florida. The modern world knows him best as the author of the great serio-comic novel The Golden Ass or Transformations (Metamorphoses), which he is generally thought to have written after his return to Carthage. He probably died about AD 180.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
6
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 15 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 43 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
Apuleius' great work is not read enough. As the story of an libertine who is unfortunately changed into an ass unfolds, we see a satire unfold that provides both entertainment and a biting commentary of life in the ancient Greco-Roman world. The book shows you the great distance between us moderns and the ancients, but what is likely to surprise you the most is precisely the opposite: those ways in which we are so similar.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Johannes Platonicus on July 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
Lucius Apuleius was one of the main representatives of North African Platonism during the second century (AD). He wrote works ranging from philosophy and medicine to poetry and rhetoric. Apuleius is best known for his remarkable collection of tales, The Golden Ass or Transformations. It is a playful satire containing the use of many different genres, much like one would find in the Mennepian satires of Petronius, Seneca, Fulgentius, or Macrobius. It is a complex and enthralling work in which interpretation is always open-ended. Apuleius' use of allegory, his exceptional talent for imagery, and his rhythmic and often poetic prose, make this text a challenge and a joy to read at the same time. The Golden Ass is definitely a masterpiece of Latin literature and can also argue of being the world's first novel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Eris on December 10, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a riveting classic. I couldn't put it down. The language and style is as good today as when it was created, and the pace is well set. However the ending is somewhat anti-climactic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Greg Deane on August 18, 2013
Format: Paperback
The Golden Ass is a ribald story with a clown for a protagonist, transformed into an ass. Lucius lacks Homeric heroism, nor the pious devotion of Hesiod; though "The Golden Ass" is a religious tale; it is an amusing treatment of the syncretic nature of Roman religion, when the pantheon expanded in line with the borders of the empire. There are no admirable characters, anticipating the sly hedonists of Boccaccio's "Decameron", set in Greece which had been reduced to a Roman province.

The story offers insights into the lives of ordinary Romans and Greeks rather than the rulers and patricians and plutocrats, and is in the tradition of the plays of Plautus and Terence, but is original in its similarity to a novel, and a work that is more focused on amusing rather than edifying with uplifting role models. But the work still offers reflections from an esoteric, religious, if not pious, and philosophical mind, as Lucius strives to reverse the black magic that has enchanted him, and gain access to the realm of the Elysium.

Apuleius was born in a Roman colony in Africa. His father was a municipal magistrates who bequeathed 2 million sesterces, enabling him to study in Carthage, the leading city in the West after Rome; attend the Academy at Athens and become learned in the scholarly Greek language, and versed in philosophy and literature; and travel to Egypt to familiarise himself with its culture and religion. He was thus equipped as a polymath, benefiting from the Pax Romana under the troubled Severan dynasty, though at this time deep fissures were appearing the empire's fabric.

The central character, Lucius, is a merchant traveling to Thessaly, a region where witchcraft is widespread, in the tradition of Medea.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Xplayer on October 13, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The Golden Ass, while set in the ancient Roman world, has a universality about it that makes it both entertaining and relevant at any time for any culture. While some of the language is antiquated, it amazes me that through the excellent translation the work flows nicely into today's language.

There were only two small reservations that I have with this book that prevented my fullest recommendation. Firstly, the formatting of the Kindle edition isn't perfect. It is rather confusing at first where the novel actually begins, as the first 12% of the book is introduction and analysis. Also, there are some errors in terms of the footnotes, as occasionally a paragraph number will appear twice, once before the paragraph (as intended) and again in the middle of a sentence. This is rather confusing as it puts an out of place number in the middle of a sentence, only for the reader to realize that it was intended to be a paragraph marker that was misplaced. As for the story itself, while largely enjoyable, I found its side stories excessive at times, and some of them were repetitive, featuring the same themes over and over. While this may appeal to some if not many people, by the umpteenth side story about adultery, I was turned off.

Despite these petty grievances, I'd recommend this book to any lover of classic literature or someone who is looking for a good Kindle edition for class.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 12, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this not knowing what it was about. My intention was to expand my knowledge of the writing of the ancient world. Wow, This was a fun read, mind you that the often the plot migrates into adult themes. Was a real eye opener to me to learn that the people that walked the earth thousands of years ago surprisingly have the same sense of humor that is prevalent today.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Xavier Fustero on May 25, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A great translation. Fully enjoyable, one of the great classics of western literature gives the flavour of life at the time
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews