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The Golden Compass (His Dark Materials, #1) Unbound – Import, October 1, 2001


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Unbound, Import, October 1, 2001

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Product Details

  • Unbound
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books (October 2001)
  • ISBN-10: 0440418607
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440418603
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,673 customer reviews)

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Customer Reviews

I really liked this book by the end.
Emf
Like every human in that world she possesses a personal daemon that protects and guides her through life.
Geert Daelemans
This book is a wonderful fantasy book with great characters, a wonderful plot and a twist.
Zoe

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

325 of 351 people found the following review helpful By M. J. JACKSON on June 18, 2005
Format: Hardcover
First of all this is really a review of the trilogy and not The Golden Compass on its own - (I prefer the British title Northern Lights and I wonder why it has a different title in North America?).

Its been a long time since I read a book ostensibly for children, possibly the last time was when I was an actual child unless you count a couple of adult re-readings of Tolkien - but I felt I had to read it to know what the fuss was about - both from the ample praise given to these books by critics and also some of the controversy they seem to have provoked - some of which is touched on in these reviews. And yeah I was impressed - I felt genuinely gripped by the plot and went out and bought both sequels right after reading Northern Lights and read them all in a day and its not everyday I do that. Incidentally I don't want to sound like I'm boasting but the last few books I read included Jorge Luis Borges, Albert Camus and Umberto Eco - all fairly grown up, intellectual authors so the previous reviewer's comment that the only people who'd enjoy this are either children or just stupid is just blatantly untrue. There is so much to admire in these works - the creation of Lyra's world with its alternative version of history, the interesting touch of the daemons and the way they represent the characters' natures, the depiction of the frozen north with its Panserborne and witches etc was just fascinating, along with the other parallel worlds visited over the trilogy (though Lyra's is the most fully realised I think) as was the whole underlying framework of Pullman's universe with its blend of theoretical physics, William Blake, Paradise lost, theology etc - you have to salute Pullman's creativity and imagination here.
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68 of 74 people found the following review helpful By BookBuzz on January 22, 2001
Format: Paperback
What's it doing in the Children's Section? Is it simply that children are at the heart of this fable? Be forewarned, this is a rich and complex tale with themes that examine the creation and structure of the universe, good and evil, and the very meaning of life and death. While cloaked in the trappings of an epic odyssey, the language, violence, and themes make this a book most suitable for mature young readers and adults.
"His Dark Materials" is not only "Dust" --the fear of which propels this story -- but it is the dark recesses of human nature. Pullman questions our views of the world, science, religion and ourselves. It is bold enough to make a clear philosophical stand, which the reader, like Lyra, comes to understand over the course of this journey through multiple universes and the inner depths of human spirit.
So why is this book in the Children's Section? Perhaps it's because it requires a mind not set firmly in its ways -- a mind that can jump from idea to idea as quickly as Lyra's daemon can change shapes.
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191 of 223 people found the following review helpful By kyravon on July 22, 2005
Format: Paperback
For anyone else getting confused, apparently for some stupid reason they retitled the book for the US version. (It's not like it's a different language and we wouldn't understand the translation.) I was about to buy this book, thinking it was a continuation of the series that I loved when I realized the plot sounded remarkably familiar.
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397 of 471 people found the following review helpful By V. Arntzen on July 29, 2005
Format: Paperback
After reading Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials one realizes that Harry Potter is training wheels, wonderful, but training wheels nevertheless. Having said that: On the web page for Northern Lights, Amazon states: buy Northern Lights + His Dark Materials for whatever the lower price is. Why don't you clearly state that Northern Lights is the original UK title for The Golden Compass? I thought perhaps there was another volume. You are a good organization. Don't try to snooker us, please.
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415 of 495 people found the following review helpful By L. Feld on December 30, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Whew! I just finished reading all three of Phillip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" books in a little over a week (I couldn't put them down!), and I'm still trying to absorb all of this. My initial reaction: this is going to be an all-time classic, and certainly not just of "young adult" or "fantasy" books (Phillip Pullman himself has stated many times that he can't read "fantasy," because it "doesn't tell [him] anything interesting about being a human being." While it is certainly different than the "Lord of the Rings," it is NOT AT ALL ridiculous to place Pullman's creation in the same pantheon as Tolkien's, which is something I swear I never thought that I would say. Anyway, the bottom line is that this trilogy is an amazing, mind-blowing, fascinating, exciting, heartbreaking, work of transcendent brilliance, and it starts with the story of Lyra, somewhat inaccurately titled, "The Golden Compass" (I guess that sounds better than "The Alethiometer" or "Lyra vs. the Gobblers" or something, but I strongly prefer the British title, "Northern Lights"). Also, the marketing of this book is very strange - if you look at the cover you might think this was some warm, fuzzy children's adventure story about a girl and her pet bear. Not!!! Instead, how about Phillip Pullman's dark take on creation and extended riff on multiple themes raised in John Milton's "Paradise Lost" and the Book of Genesis. The bottom line: if Phillip Pullman is mainly for children, than so are John Milton and the Bible! I don't think so....Read more ›
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