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The Golden Thread of Time: A Voyage of Discovery into the Lost Knowledge of the Ancients Paperback – January 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 332 pages
  • Publisher: Pendulum Publishing; 1st edition (January 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0954163907
  • ISBN-13: 978-0954163907
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 0.7 x 5.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #832,501 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Luisa F. Montserrat on November 24, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book starts out slow, but it has to, there is a lot of ground to cover.What is covered is simply a rather complete discussion of celestial navigation through time. And how that clear , simple and concise system was somehow lost to us. The Cross of Thoth is easier to use than an Octant, Sextant, or most other devices of navigation. Its existense adds more possibilities to the argument that global exploration occured at a far earlier age and with better or at least equal instruments to the best we have today. In any event certainly adequate for world wide travel. The argument presented in the book as to the determinaiton of longitude is hardly new, and fraught with danger of mistake, but possible, if excercised with great care. I ordered the DVD too and enjoyed it. it allows me to share the concepts with others while we watch the DVD at the same time. Read this book and discussions on plasma and electromagnetic energy dominating Interstellar spacethe "Electric Universe" and you will waste not a moment more on anything a modern astronomer has to say. This book is THAT seminal in importance to an understanding of the intersection of religion, science, and navigation and a host of other branches of knowledge. A lot of "Ah ha's" happen while reading this book.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By P. Perry on February 12, 2007
Format: Paperback
Leaves the pack of speculative ancient history works in the dust. Reveals how prehistoric global navigation was possible by means of primitive yet precise astronomical instruments. How archaeoastronomical sites (cosmic clocks), like Stonehenge and the Pyramids, were part of a universal time-keeping network. How lost ancient knowledge probably begat modern religious systems. Religious symbols (Christian & Celtic crosses) look remarkably similar to scientific instruments (Mariner's Astrolabe & astronomer's Cross-staff). In other words, studying the stars most likely degenerated into worshipping the heavens. Also worth reading: 'Christ Conspiracy' and 'Brotherhood of the Sun'.
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23 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Rosicrucian on December 11, 2005
Format: Paperback
Crichton Miller is a man on a mission. His mission is, in my humble opinion, far more important than the Victorian search for the source of the Nile or the 60's race for space. It is more extravagant than the discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb and in my mind of more archaeological, scientific and historical importance than just about anything else you care to mention.

To comprehend why I say this we need to just consider a few points. Firstly, how many of us agree that our Mother Earth is warming? How many of us are aware over the short lifetimes that we have had so far that the climate has been altering year after year? I know for myself, living in middle England that we no longer have the snowstorms I knew as a child; that Autumn is moving into Winter; Spring is coming sooner and Summer is stretching itself out like a lazy lion in the Sahara. In other parts of the globe huge waves crash onto idyllic shores and destroy the lives of thousands of humans; whirling tornadoes break and batter whole States in America and ice mountains the size of Ben Nevis collapse and crumble into the warming waters. There is one thing that is sure - the world is changing around us as we live and breath. Whether you believe this change is man-made or by the power of the solar Father in the sky; whether you think the leaders of political parties and corporate empires are making the destruction of the world a reality or it is simply a cycle of nature - one thing overrides the argument - we cannot escape it now.

And so, what to do, where to go, to whom do we turn? What will you hide away in your secure dug-out? Will you hoard tinned food and a tin opener? Or bottled water? And when they run out, what then? How will you hunt for food then? Should you carry a gun?
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