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The Good Fairies of New York Mass Market Paperback – June 3, 2008


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 273 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Fantasy (June 3, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765358549
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765358547
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 4.3 x 6.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #775,323 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. British author Millar offers fiercely funny (and often inebriated) Scottish fairies, a poignant love story as well as insights into the gravity of Crohn's disease, cultural conflicts and the plight of the homeless in this fey urban fantasy. Due to the machinations of the obnoxious Tala, Cornwall's fairy king, only a few humans can see the 18-inch-tall fairies who alight in Manhattan: Magenta, a homeless woman who thinks she's the ancient Greek general Xenophon; Dinnie, an overweight slacker; and Kerry, a poor artist/musician who hopes her Ancient Celtic Flower Alphabet will win a local arts prize. Fairies Heather MacKintosh and Morag MacPherson scheme to put Dinnie and Kerry together, rescue fairy artifacts and prove that in love or war, music is essential. Neil Gaiman provides an appreciative introduction. (Dec.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Review

“Read it now, and then make your friends buy their own copies. You’ll thank me someday.”—Neil Gaiman

“The funniest writer in Britain today.”—GQ

“Millar offers fiercely funny (and often inebriated) Scottish fairies, a poignant love story, cultural conflicts, and the plight of the homeless in this fey urban fantasy.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Undeniably brilliant.”—The Guardian (UK)

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Customer Reviews

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  • "Characters" 15
  • "Writing" 12
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I ended up having a truly remarkable experience with this book that was almost spiritual. It involved a car, some pain pills, an unknown disease and my mother's voice. I have decided to revel the whole story here, even though it is quite personal so that readers may gain an understanding of exactly how special this book is.

I started reading "The Good Fairies of New York" in the car on the way to school when I had a terrible headache and my mother was running into the pharmacy to get me some pain pills. I loved the first chapter so much that on her return I read it aloud for her, intending to continue on reading by myself. But when I finished and stopped vocalizing the words she protested. "Don't stop there" she said, "this is great!"

So I read on. When we weren't in the car she would read to me. Progress was slow because our schedules conflicted, neither one of us was willing to cheat by going ahead alone and every now and then we would stop to remark on how amazing the book was. Then, sadly but truly, we forgot about the book for a while.

We forgot because I got sick, really sick. Like Kerry, the silvery-blue haired woman determined to make an ancient Celtic flower alphabet and win a community arts prize despite her crone's disease (only that's not what I have.) Confused, in a lot of pain, drugged and scared about what was happening to me we turned back to the book.

This time just my mother read. Whenever I was particularly depressed, or in so much pain I wanted to die or terrified that no one was ever going to figure out what was wrong with me, she would whip out the cheerful orange-cream sunset colored novel and read a chapter or two.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By lala on April 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
I read this book for at least the third time again last night, its the type of book that ensures that youre not at all embarassed to chuckle out loud on a bus because you know its worth it. Amazingly layered, and hilarious; if I could be an original writer like this i'd be damn happy.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By C. Carroll on October 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
I scour thrift shops for used books, and have stumbled upon some doozies in my time. One of my personal favorites has been the (out-of-print, and very expensive) UK 3-book collection of Martin Millar's unique fantasy novels. I knew nothing about the book or the author, but was intrigued by the day-glo green cover of a punk-rocker in a tu-tu, and the blurbs about the novels. This novel seemed the most interesting to me - I was intrigued by the idea of punk fairies. I read this book in a few days, staying up late, and enjoyed it immensely. The fairies are highly entertaining, and the human characters are very well-drawn and sympathetic, providing an intersting balance of comedy and pathos. I haven't read the other two books in my omnibus edition, I'm saving them. But, I am delighted to see that this book that I thought was so obscure and hard to find coming in to print in the US, and with a gushing intro by Neil Gaiman. I hope this book finds an audience, and that we get more of this author's works in print on this side of the Atlantic.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Dee Marie on April 9, 2006
Format: Paperback
If you haven't read The Good Fairies of New York, and especially if you are a New Yorker, or a New Yorker at heart, stop reading this right now, and immediately put your name on the Amazon.com pre-order list ... The Good Fairies have found their way back home to Amazon.com and to NYC, and everyone around the world is overly excited by the news!

I have been addicted to Martin Millar for over ten years. I was one of the lucky few to have purchased a copy of The Good Fairies of New York before it became an out-of-print statistic.

Martin has a talent for twisting the logic out of reality, and making you believe his tales are not mere inventions of his fragmented mind, but instead are actual events. The Good Fairies of New York will make you a believer, if not in fairies, at least in Martin's belief that they exist.

The Good Fairies is not a child's fairytale, but instead a tale that includes fairies. Martin's forte is writing about characters that are flawed (some physically flawed, all emotionally flawed). Although Martin brings a refreshing childlike innocence in his approach of character development, his books are very adult orientated.

He is not afraid to tackle serious subjects using a perverse sense of humor to lighten the mood when life becomes too grim. The Good Fairies will take you on an emotional ride that you will want to re-experience over and over.

All of Martin's books should have the following label ... Caution: be forewarned that all it takes is one book to become a Martin Millar junkie!
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By sven becker on October 25, 2001
Format: Paperback
When a colleague of mine recommended me to read this book -no, she urged me to read it- I believed it would be like every other "great" book. It isn't. It's better.
It's the story of wild juvenile elves who behave just like adolescent girls and boys- i.e. they consume drugs, they struggle with the traditions of the elderly and -at last- they bring chaos to a whole city.
You're thinking: what could they do to have this effect?
If you want to know, you got to read it!
"The Good Fairies..." is not just another crazy story but more:
it's satire and allegory, it's a love story (between human beings) and it's an hint on things we can't see any more with our rationalist eyes!
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