The Good Muslim and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$89.10
Qty:1
  • List Price: $99.00
  • Save: $9.90 (10%)
Usually ships within 1 to 3 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Good Muslim: Reflections on Classical Islamic Law and Theology Hardcover – June 11, 2012


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$89.10
$25.00 $39.23

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on the current pick, "The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee" by Marja Mills.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (June 11, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521518644
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521518642
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,939,254 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'Challenging reading ...' The Tablet

Book Description

In this thought-provoking book, Mona Siddiqui reflects upon key themes in Islamic law and theology. These themes, which range through discussions about friendship, divorce, drunkenness, love, slavery, and ritual slaughter, offer fascinating insights into Islamic ethics, and the way in which arguments developed in medieval juristic discourse. These pre-modern religious works contained a richness of thought, hesitation and speculation on a wide range of topics, which were socially relevant but also presented intellectual challenges to the scholars for whom God's revelation could be understood in diverse ways. These subjects remain relevant today, for practicing Muslims and scholars of Islamic law and religious studies. Mona Siddiqui is an astute and articulate interpreter who relays complex ideas about the Islamic tradition with great clarity. These are important attributes for a book, which charts the authors own journey through the classical texts, and reflects upon how the principles expounded there have guided her own thinking and impacted her teaching and research.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Moran VINE VOICE on January 17, 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
As the subtitle suggests, this book is a collection of essays that constitute reflections on aspects of the law, theology and ethics of Islam as shown primarily in writings from Islam's classical period, defined by author Mona Siddiqui roughly as the years from circa 1000 to circa 1500-1600. Siddiqui herself is Professor of Islamic and Interreligious Studies at the Divinity School of the University of Edinburgh.

Subjects considered include divorce in Islamic law (which required classical scholars to consider what intent was needed for effectual divorce, how this intent must be manifested in words and guidelines for the resolution of the effect of "problematic" utterances in circumstances where the existence of the necessary intent to divorce is unclear), the status of slaves, the proper practice of ritual slaughter of animals sacrificed to God, the Islamic attitude toward drunkenness, including what constitutes drunkenness and the effects of drunkenness on a believer's fitness for the performance of effective religious duties, Islam and the problem of evil (with insights from other traditions also), the meanings of the language of love as expressed in the Qur'an, and virtue and limits in the ethics of friendship in the Islamic scholarly tradition.

I was repeatedly struck by each of these essays with the diligent efforts of the classical scholars to interpret the materials before them so as to give a fair and accurate reading of God's will in the matters. Equally obvious, however, was each scholar's efforts not to set the bar so high as to be out of the reach of ordinary believers. The "rules" of Islamic life, as discussed in this book, do not require heroic measures from the faithful in order to meet the mark.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Richard Staats VINE VOICE on December 17, 2012
Format: Paperback
Professor Siddiqui has written an excellent book that explains some common questions about the Islamic faith from a strict Moslem perspective.

Having had a chance to live for years in Islamic states, I appreciated the candor of the Professor's analysis.

She does not candy coat her explanations, and in many of the explanations Professor Siddiqui does come down to a single, important element, faith.

Somewhere in the Age of Reason, the Industrial Revolution, and the Information Age, faith has been given a discounted value.

Then, large swaths of the world are confronted by actions take on faith and cannot understand the motivation.

Professor Siddiqui's, "the Good Muslim," serves as an excellent set of footnotes for world events.

Whether you are a faithful Moslem who is interested in some non-obvious aspects of Islamic faith and culture or someone of another walk who is just interested in Islamic faith and motivation, this book is for you!

In service,

Rich
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Joel L. Watts VINE VOICE on January 16, 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
But...but I am a Christian...how could I enjoy this book this much? Mona Siddiqui is the Professor of Islamic and Interreligious Studies in the School of Divinity at The University of Edinburgh. She is a Muslim. She is a good Muslim. And this is a good book.

Contrary to popular opinion, the whole of Islam is summed up neither in the media's nor the Islamic fundamentalist's representation of sharia law. Siddiqui's goal is not to rehabilitate Islam, nor to elevate Islam over either Judaism or Christianity; her goal is to showcase the ofter overlooked (by Western eyes) beauty of Islamic thought, something very few non-Muslims recognize. No, we cannot call it Islamic theology, because as she notes, the Christian view of theology is wholly different than the Islamic view. Her goal, then, is to call attention to the intelligenstia of Islam's greatest teachers, to give a hidden view of what she finds in her faith.

While the book is not divided into sections, the chapters fall somewhat naturally into a bifurcated rythme. The first portion clearly deals with issues of Law while the second deals with Qur'anic views on life, love, and happiness. On the subject of Qur'anic law, the Western reader (albeit Christian or Jewish), will find that the broadcasted views of sharia law are more often than not equal to that of Christian zealots, i.e., gross misinterpretations. In this section, Siddiqui covers divorce, slavery, and purity laws (eating swine). Many of the views -- these are views expressed over the centuries by medieval and modern Islamic intellectuals -- will surprise Christians who tend to view Islam in much the same way they would view an archaic version of Paul's Judaism. The second section, beginning with chapter 5, is perhaps the most important to even the casual reader.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By William Garrison Jr. VINE VOICE on January 2, 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
"The Good Muslim" by Mon Siddiqui (2012). The book provides little info regarding the moderate Muslim author herself, who teaches in England. The author has taken something like "The 40 Hadiths", scaled them down to 7-10 basic themes of specific interest to herself and extensively expanded on them - which, if followed, make for "The Good Muslim." {Nothing mentioned herein about how to reform terroristic jihadists.} As the author asked: "how did Islam come to be seen as a religion of law and Christianity a religion of love?" (p. 137). Regarding `love', the author analyzes the thoughts of various medieval and modern Western philosophers for comparison with Islamic theologians, but she acknowledged that most Muslim writers have commented on how norms detailed in the Quran and ahadith seem to make Islam a numerical or mathematical form of law: do this or that action that either Allah loves or displeases - and you get the appropriate corresponding punishment: 40, etc., lashes. How does God's love for man differ from man's love of Allah? The author noted that her book: "certainly does not aim to reflect what many understand to be normative Islam. My interest is discursive Islam. I have divided the chapters broadly into the `legal' and the `theological'." Themes discussed herein include: slavery, ritually slaughtered meat (pigs, carrion, blood), wine drinking, Allah's predestination vs. an individual's free-will regarding evil choices, and the `significance for the oral formulae in divorce' - valid when intoxicated or ill?Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search