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The Gospel According to Jesus: A Faith that Restores All Things Hardcover – September 28, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson (September 28, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0849948169
  • ISBN-13: 978-0849948169
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (95 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,742,663 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Chris Seay is a church planter, pastor, president of Ecclesia Bible Society, and internationally acclaimed speaker. His six books include The Gospel According to Lost, The Gospel According to Tony Soprano, and Faith of My Fathers.

More About the Author

Chris Seay is a church planter, pastor, president of Ecclesia Bible Society, and internationally acclaimed speaker. His six previous books include The Gospel According to Lost, The Gospel According to Tony Soprano, and Faith of My Fathers.

Customer Reviews

On the ...more The Gospel According to Jesus, by Chris Seay, is a very thought-provoking book.
Logan Stewart
Good statements, yet there was something in this book that just seemed to sit wrong with me all the way through it.
Thad Bergmeier
It took me much longer to read than most books because I found myself grabbing my Bible to check things out.
C. A. Fairman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Sheldon on November 11, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I finished reading Chris Seay's book "The Gospel According to Jesus: A Faith that Restores All Things" a couple of weeks ago. I waited to post this review because I wanted time to think through the main thoughts Seay presents before attempting to write about them.

"The Gospel According to Jesus" really hinges on one primary assertion: that the church has misunderstood the righteousness of God. This misunderstanding has led to a failure to accomplish what a proper understanding would have compelled us to accomplish, namely the mission to partner with God to restore all things back to Shalom or peace. Naturally then, the main premise of the book is correcting the misunderstanding of God's righteousness and laying out the implications of that correct understanding. This is, in essence, the totality of the book. Chris Seay does a good job, I believe, of laying out the implications of the "correct" understanding of righteousness. If his definition is the correct one, then I believe the calling of the church is as he suggests.

I have a couple of concerns.

First is that Chris uses a translation/paraphrase of the bible that he helped create. Because "The Voice" (the bible version used for all biblical references in the book) is a paraphrased translation, it is highly interpretive. So basically, Chris quotes a bible that uses his interpretations of scripture to validate his interpretation of scripture. That seems a little circular to me and does not inspire confidence that what we are reading is anything other than his opinions as opposed to the truth from the word of god.

The second concern is the actual definition of righteousness that Chris proposes.

"The best simple translation of the word righteousness is `restorative justice.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By G. Branch on September 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Surprised and challenged. That's how I'd describe my review of this book. I'd read others from his circle of friends and been disappointed, to be honest. I expected more of the same from Chris Seay. I was wrong. There is more focus on the things of God and more depth here than I'd seen elsewhere. The author defines righteousness, the gospel, justification and even takes on the imago dei. He's not putting out some fluff here. Surprised? The emerging/emergent elements are coming of age. And in the process rediscovering some truth that the mainline had sidelined. My hope is that this continues to affect their lives. It's like watching the fervor of the boomers in the 60's again. Let's see if the new generation can pull it off and not be defined as an "unrealized" (Tom Brokaw) generation.

Chris Seay opens his book with a quote from Gandhi who says basically that he likes Jesus but wonders about His followers. Most of us have heard that quote and winced at it's truth. The author sets out to discover why that is so and what to do about it. Yes, there's some criticism of the church and how it has conducted itself particularly in the USA. Seay attributes some of the problem to ignorance, willful or otherwise. His closing chapter lists "The Ten Commandments of a Shalom Life" which point the way to a truly meaningful life. He is careful to say that all must be brought to God through prayer.

I found myself challenged by the content of this book. His focus is much more toward engaging the world than forming a cozy club that hides from the world. In doing so it can feel as if he is advocating for social justice alone, but please read him more carefully. He does address more than that in this book. Think about what he says.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lisa A. Syler on December 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The title of this book alone intrigued me! Assuming it was a modern-day synopsis of the Gospel message, I passed it by. However, something within my spirit kept repeating the book title. Discovering that The Gospel according to Jesus is a detailed study of Romans, a book I sometimes struggle with, I again doubted this was a book I would immerse myself in. I admit that is the case! It is an excellent and in-depth review of a survey done by Chris Seay and the Barna Research Group relating to Christians understanding of the basics of their faith. As stated in a book review: "Imagine a church were 84% of Christians are completely unfamiliar with the essential tenets of their faith, with a crippling misunderstanding of the word righteousness and, in turn, the gospel of Jesus." It is not a book I read straight through; rather, I picked it up periodically and read another chapter, followed by some time to digest and ponder my thoughts.
Seay writes in an interesting style of information, personal stories and interviews with leaders in the church The general premise of the book is that most Christians have a false sense of understanding of what it means to be righteous, which is the message of the Gospel. He feels that most believers think of righteousness in terms of moral standards, which is not what the message of Jesus to His followers is about. Seay spends the entire book detailing the righteous and restorative gift offered by Christ alone to those who follow Him.
I found myself marking little quips that I want to write down and post around various places, to remind me of the Gospel message. These include:
"Brothers and sisters, there can be nothing worse than Jesus knocking at the door while we are so busy with our own agenda that we can't hear him.
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