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The Great Cryptogram: Francis Bacon's Cipher in the So-Called Shakespeare Plays Hardcover – January 1, 1888


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: R. S. Peale & Co.,; First Edition edition (1888)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0006DGOCE
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,920,785 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John McConnell on February 3, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I've read several books over the years on the question of who truly authored the Shakespearean plays, and recall an interview in which Sir Derek Jacobi stated he thought de Vere wrote the plays, not Shakespeare. Mark Twain wrote a brilliant monograph on this question entitled Is Shakespeare Dead? From my autobiography. in which Twain argues Sir Francis Bacon was the actual author of the plays. That essay immediately convinced me the traditional orthodox assignation of the plays to the man from Stratford who never wrote a single letter in his life could not be correct. I subsequently read two other interesting books that confirmed me in my new-found prejudice: Edwin Reed's Bacon vs. Shakespeare: brief for plaintiff, and Penn Leary's The Second Cryptographic Shakespeare.

Ignatius Donnelly here invokes considerable circumstantial evidence, as do the three authors above, that Sir Francis Bacon wrote the plays of Shakespeare. The reason for secrecy would have been the highly hazardous and politically charged climate of Elizabethan England: "It was an age of plots and counter-plots." For example, the contemporary Elizabethan playwrights Ben Jonson, Thomas Kyd, and Christopher Marlowe were imprisoned, racked, and assassinated, respectively.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Laura on February 25, 2001
Format: Unknown Binding
I really liked this book, because it was packed full of so much information. I used it for an English project on Shakspearen authorship and Francis Bacon played a huge role in Shakespeares life. I will refer this book to anyone.
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