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The Great Dune Trilogy: "Dune", "Dune Messiah", "Children of Dune" (GollanczF.) Paperback – November 17, 2005


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Product Details

  • Series: GollanczF.
  • Paperback: 912 pages
  • Publisher: Gollancz (November 17, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0575070706
  • ISBN-13: 978-0575070707
  • Product Dimensions: 2.1 x 6 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #918,584 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Frank Herbert (1920-86) was born in Tacoma, Washington and worked as a reporter and later editor of a number of West Coast newspapers before becoming a full-time writer. His first sf story was published in 1952 but he achieved fame more than ten years later with the publication in Analog of 'Dune World' and 'The Prophet of Dune', amalgamated into the Hugo and Nebula-winning novel DUNE in 1965.

More About the Author

Frank Herbert (1920-86) was born in Tacoma, Washington and worked as a reporter and later editor of a number of West Coast newspapers before becoming a full-time writer. His first sf story was published in 1952 but he achieved fame more than ten years later with the publication in Analog of Dune World and The Prophet of Dune that were amalgamated in the novel Dune in 1965.

Customer Reviews

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See all 9 customer reviews
This is a great trilogy, well worth the purchase.
Steve W.
The third book again sets loose some of Herbert's wildest imaginations and truly challenges the reader among multiple levels of interstellar scheming and conspiracies.
Lassi*aL
It won the first Nebula award and shared a Hugo award, and it has been the best selling SF book of all times.
Ignace Saenen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ignace Saenen on March 24, 2008
Format: Paperback
It won the first Nebula award and shared a Hugo award, and it has been the best selling SF book of all times. Dune, Dune messiah and Children of Dune, the 3 books originally written, tells the dazzling story of an honorable family that tries to keep up in a rat race full of betrayal, trust, heroism and sensitivity. As you will discover, the story is not just playing out in your book, it is everywhere. But while the story never pretends to need a new environment, Frank Herbert brilliantly brings an exciting but very dangerous universe convincingly to life, several thousands years into the future. Taking a step back after reading, anyone will agree that Herbert was a visionary with a delicate taste for symbolism and a way with metaphors that has been unparalleled so far. Dune will lock you into your chair for days, if not weeks, and reading it again becomes a promise much rather than an option. This is a book that will not just be on your shelf, it will dictate what's next to it.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Lassi*aL on January 2, 2011
Format: Paperback
The Dune trilogy was not made to be a book. But this compilation of the three first writings of Herbert's Dune volumes certainly does an honor by putting the books from 1965, 1969 and 1976 together. In the historical perspective, it is easy to appreciate and understand the influence of the long time frame upon the "trilogy." Herbert had worked on the first volume for almost six years before it had come out in two parts and took clearly less time to finish the second book. Maybe this serves as an explanation if not justification for the apparent fluctuation in the tempo of the book.

The first part of the Dune is staggering. It presents an exploration to an enticing universe that is full of details and shadows of the fictive historical past that are cast upon the plot leaving the reader often puzzled. It includes many styles familiar to modern reader, but maintains a uniform epic grasp of the reader until the very end, which comes like a slam of a door against the face.

Dune Messiah, the second book, presents a stylistic diversion. The plot is more clearly focused on political and religious aspects of the Empire and the obvious schemes presented early on make it even somewhat dull in contrast to the volume I. Maybe luckily this is the shortest of the three books by small marginal and mostly serves as an introduction to the Children of Dune. The third book again sets loose some of Herbert's wildest imaginations and truly challenges the reader among multiple levels of interstellar scheming and conspiracies. By the end of it, it becomes difficult to tell who is becoming crazy, the subject, the writer, or the reader, as the author dives deep into expanded horizons of consciousness.

Overall, Dune universe is a worthy of exploring and this paperback version of the trilogy provides the perfect travel companion!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By mjrmontoya on July 7, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
excellent version of the timeless trilogy. It was a gift for my dear aunt, and I'm glad I picked up this version.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Enjolras TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 22, 2010
Format: Paperback
I like the direction Frank Herbert took the Dune series in his first two sequels. This book has a bit more development than the original Dune. We get to learn more about the inner turmoil of Paul, Alia, and then meet the kids. Frank has a way of creating politically exciting twists and power struggles, without making any one character the villain. Paul and Alia in their own ways are both despots and victims. In terms of storyline, I think this brings the story to a satisfying conclusion (I'm not so big a fan of what happens after Children of Dune (Dune Chronicles, Book 3)).

Frank's writing style can be a bit dense. Sometimes the dialogue is filled with philosophical or nonsensical musings. Some of it is quite deep - but certainly not how people actually talk. It takes some getting used to. I'd recommend only continuing on to this book if you got through the original Dune and liked it.

If you liked the books, I highly recommend Frank Herbert's Children of Dune (Sci-Fi TV Miniseries) (Two-Disc DVD Set) - it's a pretty good film adaptation of Dune Messiah (Dune Chronicles) and Children of Dune (Dune Chronicles, Book 3).
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. Roeder on April 13, 2007
Format: Paperback
Complex, astounding worlds are created in the trilogy and the subsequent titles. The reader follows the young prince into the desert and exciting adventures. Yet advanced technologies, antiquated and new weapons fuel an ancient power struggle and reflect rather dismally on an all too human thirst to control the known world. Whilst the plot keeps the reader on the edge of his seat with surprising twists and turns a philosophical portrayal of mankind unfolds, and the sight is not pretty. A masterful epic.
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