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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I'm motivated and its working 10,000 steps is tough, but doable!
This is a quick book to read and yet interesting at the same time. The author has lots of research to back up his claims. I like the idea of walking as a way to keep my weight where it is and not have to worry about it going up every year as I age. Getting old stinks and getting fat and old really stinks. This book put lots of claims to rest about how you can't be...
Published on January 19, 2012 by Book Him Danno

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fine, until it goes off the rails at Chapter 24
If i'd stopped reading at Chapter 23, i probably would have given this book 4 stars. Sure, it's done in a very infomercial-ish style, with lots of bold text for emphasis, random HUGE text for when the salesman would deliver his 'all this for only $9.99!' moment, and so on. But the book is, as the author himself points out, one of way too many books on the weight...
Published on October 30, 2011 by Silea


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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fine, until it goes off the rails at Chapter 24, October 30, 2011
By 
Silea (Pacific Northwest) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Great Fat Fraud: Why the "Obesity Epidemic" Isn't, How to Be Totally Healthy without Losing Weight and If You Should Lose Some Pounds, How to Keep Them from Finding You Again (Paperback)
If i'd stopped reading at Chapter 23, i probably would have given this book 4 stars. Sure, it's done in a very infomercial-ish style, with lots of bold text for emphasis, random HUGE text for when the salesman would deliver his 'all this for only $9.99!' moment, and so on. But the book is, as the author himself points out, one of way too many books on the weight loss/diet/exercise shelf, and it needs to grab its audience.

Either way, the gist is this: being fit matters more than what you weigh. If you're fat and fit (yes, it's possible), you're actually less likely to die young than someone who's skinny and sedentary. And all you need to do to get fit is walk 10,000 steps a day. No aerobics, no spin class, no sweating or panting. You don't even need to be walking 10,000 steps tomorrow. You just wear a pedometer, keep track of how much you walk, and add a little bit every once in a while. It's as simple as that.

There are even good counter-arguments for the standard 'but i can't because...' assertions. The best one, which i thought could have used more emphasis, is that you can walk while watching TV. Americans can 'make time' to watch a few hours of TV a day, but can't make time to walk to reduce their chance of an early end. The solution: put a treadmill in front of the TV, and you can still watch American Idol while you walk.

There's even a nice section on how to present the data to your doctor, so that once you start your 10,000-steps-a-day regimen you'll stop getting the 'you need to lose weight' lecture at every visit.

Of course, there are plenty of people so fat they can barely walk 100 steps, nevermind 10,000. The author doesn't have much to say for them, except that perhaps they're the only real candidates for bariatric surgery. (He, perhaps trying to be cute, draws an analogy between bariatric surgery and ritual seppuku - suicide by disemboweling oneself. Too bad he misspells it 'hari kari' instead of the correct 'hara kiri'.)

At Chapter 24, though, the author goes on a vitriolic tirade that, ironically, undermines his own position. Why do so many researchers produce so much research showing that obesity is epidemic, that obesity kills? Clearly because they all hate fat people. It has nothing to do with that being where the money is, or the charts and graphs and articles the author himself bases his entire argument on, showing that obesity raises the risk of death dramatically.

His starting claims may be true, that the establishment of the BMI cut-offs for 'overweight' and 'obese' were set with little regard for the details of the data, and that that data doesn't distinguish between 'fit' and 'unfit'. Even with those flaws, the data clearly shows that, in aggregate, people with a BMI over 25 die more than people with a BMI below 25. It doesn't matter why the line is at 25, the data is pretty clear (and, of course, it's the data the author himself uses to establish his claims).

He could easily have chosen a slightly different approach, perhaps suggesting the need for research using methods other than BMI to determine health status (BMI is incredibly and notoriously flawed as an indicator of health, since it can't distinguish between fat and muscle, thus ruling many a weight lifter or triathlon participant 'obese'). Or he could have called for studies that attempt to distinguish what percentage of people in each BMI group are fit, thus providing a more thorough investigation than the one such study he was able to cite. But no, he gives suggestions to tweet or post on facebook if you ever find data that aligns with his.

In the end, he accuses basically any researcher who publishes a paper showing the correlation between a high BMI and diabetes, heart disease, joint disease, gout, or whatever of being a crony of the diet industry or just a fat-person-hater. It couldn't possibly be because a lot of people are dying from health issues correlated with obesity (whether obesity is the cause, or a result of the same underlying 'unfitness'), and thus more funding goes to scientists studying it. Nope. It's because they're bigots.

So... stop at the end of chapter 23, buy a pedometer, park at the far end of the parking lot when you go shopping, and live a longer, healthier life.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I'm motivated and its working 10,000 steps is tough, but doable!, January 19, 2012
This review is from: The Great Fat Fraud: Why the "Obesity Epidemic" Isn't, How to Be Totally Healthy without Losing Weight and If You Should Lose Some Pounds, How to Keep Them from Finding You Again (Paperback)
This is a quick book to read and yet interesting at the same time. The author has lots of research to back up his claims. I like the idea of walking as a way to keep my weight where it is and not have to worry about it going up every year as I age. Getting old stinks and getting fat and old really stinks. This book put lots of claims to rest about how you can't be healthy and carry a bit of weight. Your skinny friends may be at a greater risk of early death then you are...find out why when you read this book.

Exercise is not a dirty word and walking is an easy way to get it done. 10,000 steps a day about 5 miles, this included the walking you do all day long, about 3500-4000 steps a day on average. Kick that up to 10,000 and don't gain back the weight you just worked so hard to lose or don't put on those aging pounds everyone seems to carry in middle age.

Read this book and find out why the way you have tried to lose weight or keep extra pounds from finding you has failed every time in the past. Walking is the key, 10,000 steps a day...go get a pedometer and start seeing how you are doing....then kick it up to 10,000 steps for health and a healthy weight to boot.

A few weeks later :After reading this book I was at the Dollar Tree with the kids so I picked up a cheap pedometer to give the 10,000 steps a try and see how many steps I really do in a regular day. Well the cheap pedometer was a pain and kept shutting itself off, so after a few days I researched the best pedometer and ended up buying the Omron HJ-112 Digital Pocket Pedometer from Amazon

This is so much easier to use then the cheap one, but the one con I see using it is that it doesn't count slow steps and as a substitute teacher I get lots of slow steps in during the day(checking over shoulders as the kids work on items. I slowly plod around the room and none of those steps are counted.) Otherwise it works great.

Results: I have found that on a day I am home, that is a non-weekend, I average 2000-3000 steps and that is it....WOW! That really was a shock to me, I'm not what I would consider a sedentary person, but maybe I'm wrong.

Some stats on me: Height 5' 5"
Weight 125
Age 42

I exercise almost everyday and I stay pretty active in my daily life...obviously not steps. I decided after reading this book to give the 10,000 steps a day a try. I wear the pedometer on my hip or in a pocket(the best part about this one is the ability to carry it in a pocket, I have even clipped it to the front of my bra if no pocket is available and I don't want a lump at my hip, it hides quite nice.) For over two weeks now I have gotten my 10,000 steps each day and my feet ache a bit at the end of the day. A few days I have been short so I jump on the treadmill before bed and put on the needed 1000-1500 steps, this is after I have already walked a half hour or more every morning. 10,000 steps didn't seem like a lot when I read the book, but I have to tell you that it is! I believe it will be worth it, but I thought it would be a breeze and that I walked that much anyway....wow what an eye opener to realize just how little I move during a regular day. I think everyone should find out how many steps they average in a day, it's interesting to see how much or how little you really move. Summertime I would have no problem getting the steps done, we walk everywhere and rarely drive the car. But it is now late fall and getting cold so we are in the car daily.

The reason I want to do this is to test the book theory about not putting weight on as I age. The author states that if we walk 10,000 steps each day we can keep our weight where it is...that is what I want as I age. Extra pounds have a way of finding you as the years pass. I don't want to put on pounds each year, I want to stay at the weight I am now.

A Few Months later: I have been wearing a pedometer for the last few months and getting my 10,000 steps each day. It is not easy it takes lots of time. I average about 2500 a day without extra work. I try to walk on the treadmill or outside at least 3-4 miles each day to get to the 10,000 and make sure I park far from work, school, and the stores each day. I take the steps in my house more often not waiting for things to take up with me. It is difficult to get the 10,000 steps each day, but I feel like I have accomplished something every night when I take it off until the next day. My weight has gone down about 2 pounds and is now stable at 123. This is worth it, but if you think you walk that much in a day think again. My husband wore it to work the other day and only logged 3507 steps for the whole day.

We move a lot less than we think. Read this book The Great Fat Fraud, Get a pedometer and start really seeing how little you move. I cannot believe how little I moved. No wonder our weight goes up every year along with our clothing size. Give this book a try and get a pedometer you will be shocked at how much you truly move each day. Get moving and stay fit at any size.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fitness in 10,000 Easy Steps, October 9, 2011
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This review is from: The Great Fat Fraud: Why the "Obesity Epidemic" Isn't, How to Be Totally Healthy without Losing Weight and If You Should Lose Some Pounds, How to Keep Them from Finding You Again (Paperback)
It is past time that the perspective offered in this book got a wider audience. Americans are forever told that they need to "lose" weight, that they are obese, and that obesity is the cause of (many of) their health concerns. But the reality is that much of the "research" showing the ill effects of obesity on health are actually showing something else, namely the poor effects of a lack of fitness on health. Schatzki's book clarifies this basic point by noting that the best of current research shows that weight has little effect on health, but fitness is the key. People at a "healthy" weight are still far more likely to die of various diseases like cardiac failure if they don't exercise than people with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 who do exercise. And "exericise" is no where near as difficult as many would suspect. This book argues that simply walking as little as 10,000 steps a day (roughly 2 miles) is all it takes. (Note, this is 10,000 steps over a whole day, not all at once!)

Although many will buy this book in the hopes of getting fit or losing a little weight, the most fascinating part of "The Great Fat Fraud" for me was how research into obesity was hijacked for the benefit of the managed weight loss industry. Despite numerous studies showing that optimal BMI (assuming fitness) is between 23 and 27, the industry succeeding in lowering the "healthy" rating to 20-25. They did this by first manipulating the UN report on obesity and later falsifying data in the 2004 FDA report on "Actual Causes of Death" in America. The report purported to show that obesity results in 400,000 deaths annually. The reality is quite different and the report was quickly debunked, but the fact that 9 of the 11 people on the committee who produced the report were managers of weight loss clinics suggests just how easy it is for an industry to seize control of the government agency that is supposed to regulate it. Schatzki gives numerous examples of the biased research that has appeared since that report, but does not make the obvious connection, namely that we should be far more critical of government funded and sponsored "science" in general. Far from being neutral, it is fairly easy for "science" funded by government agencies to be biased, often in favor of certain industries. One suspects that much of the research behind "global warming," for example, falls into the same category.

So if fitness is the key, what should you do? Give up on weight loss? Actually, that is not a bad idea according to the author. Pursuing fitness at any weight is probably the best strategy for optimal health, and walking is a great way to do it. But if you do decide to lose weight, he suggests a cautious diet, and adds that any long term success is likely to only be accomplished with regular exercise. So throw out the diet pills, the fad diets, risky medical surguries, and most forms of calorie counting in favor of just walking more. For the most part, this reviewer agrees with the author. I have personally lost 80 pounds, but hiking and regular visits to the gym (most of my time at which is on the treadmill) has been the reason I have kept it off. Nonetheless, I should add that walking, great as it is, is not the only exercise you can or should get. The author suggests walking more because, frankly, most people do not enjoy exercise. But group classes like pilates offer benefits that walking alone does not. Strengthening abs, for example, tends to reduce back pain, a problem often ascribed to obesity. Walking alone will not do that. But in general, the author is correct. Fitness, not an ideal weight, should be the goal of most people.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Different and Interesting Perspective., October 3, 2011
This review is from: The Great Fat Fraud: Why the "Obesity Epidemic" Isn't, How to Be Totally Healthy without Losing Weight and If You Should Lose Some Pounds, How to Keep Them from Finding You Again (Paperback)
I approached this book with a healthy degree of skepticism. Daily I see too many people who are terribly overweight and I believe that many of them are health problems waiting to happen.

This book makes an interesting distinction between fat and fitness. The major premise of the book is that fat should not be the major concern. Mike Schatzki, the author, makes a very compelling case that we should be more concerned with fitness rather than fat.

Mike goes into great detail explaining basically how the body works. Many thousands of years ago when humans were often faced with feast or famine, the body adapted by storing fat during the good times. Then when the lean times occurred, the body could use the stored fat for survival. The body still works that way. We basically have a set point - a weight which is normal for our individual body. We can lose weight or gain weight and the body will adjust our desire for food when we get too far away from our set point.

Dieting is a forced famine. And when the diet is over, the natural tendency of the body is to regain the lost fat for the next famine. Unfortunately the continued up and down as a result of numerous diets can and often does create a new set point. That is why so many people gain back the weight they lost plus a little more.

According to Mr. Schatzki, the answer is not dieting but in getting fit. He does not recommend rigid exercise programs. Simply walking a certain amount each day will help you get fit. The recommended number of steps we should be taking each day is 10,000.

There is a section on the dangers of weight loss surgery and the magic diet pills and products available. Anyone considering surgery or any of the magic methods of losing weight would do well to read these chapters.

The book is well written in a very conversational format. In the body of the book, the theory is backed up with reference to scientific studies. The end notes are very extensive, providing much more detail about the scientific studies that would otherwise clutter up the body text. In addition, the author gives a link to his website where there are links to all the scientific studies cited in the book.

The book is fairly short and can be read in a couple of hours.

The author presents a very different and important perspective to the obesity debate. I believe it is a bit difficult to be too much overweight and still be fit. But the author makes a clear case that being fit is critical to ones health.

A very interesting and informative read. I think anyone who is considering dieting or is in fact a serial dieter would gain some great insights from reading this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Debunking obesity hysteria, May 13, 2013
By 
Deb Nam-Krane "dnkboston" (Boston, MA United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Great Fat Fraud: Why the "Obesity Epidemic" Isn't, How to Be Totally Healthy without Losing Weight and If You Should Lose Some Pounds, How to Keep Them from Finding You Again (Paperback)
The Great Fat Fraud by Mike Schatzki helps untangle the issues around fitness, weight, diet, surgery and the weight loss industry. By the end of the book, the reader should walk away with the understanding that fitness does not equal thinness and that achieving weight loss is much simpler than Weight Watchers, Jenny Craig and LA Weight Loss would have you believe.

Within the first six chapters, the author cites the work of three large, long-term studies (some going back to 1953) that show conclusively that the most reliable predictor of mortality isn't size but fitness and activity level. (Although many define "fitness" differently, for this purpose it's a measure of how well the body can use oxygen.) An active, fit person has a significantly lower risk of mortality than a sedentary person- regardless of body mass index (BMI). If mortality is the primary concern, activity is the answer. Numerous studies have shown that walking 10,000 steps per day is the target for the majority of people to achieve optimal fitness levels.

The next chapters discuss losing weight. For most people, fitness activity will not result in very much weight loss, if any. In order to achieve lasting weight loss, people have to 1) reduce their food intake (in other words, diet) until they hit a weight plateau and then 2) follow that up with activity- ie, 10,000 steps per day. This combination will prevent the body from going into starvation mode and hoarding fat, which is what it does when deprived of calories (ie, dieting). Weight loss is doable- and in fact, most people on diets have done it before they regain some or all of their weight- but the author takes pains to note that for most people weight loss is an aesthetic choice, not a health imperative. In these chapters he also cites a study that showed that people who focused on body acceptance improved their health (lipid levels, blood pressure, activity, etc.) more than those who focused on dieting and, not coincidentally, felt better about themselves.

Schatzki spends a brief chapter each on stomach reduction surgery (because of the risks, it's only appropriate for the most unhealthy 1 or 2 percent of the obese), weight loss drugs (which, unlike other drugs, trick a healthy body into malfunctioning) and weight loss programs (most of them can help you take the weight off, but you won't keep it off... unless you're active). However, the most damning section of the book deals with what he calls the "researchaganda" that promotes the idea that obesity is a public health threat when in fact is not.

By 1998 the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Obesity Task Force of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) had been manipulated by the weight loss industry to the point that the BMIs for overweight and obese had been lowered (to 25 to 30 and over 30, respectively). In 2004, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) published a report that obesity was responsible for 400,000 deaths every year.

Although the CDC study was debunked shortly after it was published (by everyone from the Wall Street Journal and Science Magazine to the Government Accountability Office), the damage had been done. The media now had a story: fat isn't just something people didn't find attractive, it's a dangerous public health issue, and there is nothing modern media loves like a story that scares people- even if it's not true.

At the end, Schatzki asks readers to take up the challenge to spread the real story about weight, fitness and obesity and offers links to the information cited in his book.

Both well-researched and accessible, this is a short, easy read that debunks obesity hysteria. Recommended for anyone with an interest in health issues.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Lacking some important key points, March 7, 2012
This review is from: The Great Fat Fraud: Why the "Obesity Epidemic" Isn't, How to Be Totally Healthy without Losing Weight and If You Should Lose Some Pounds, How to Keep Them from Finding You Again (Paperback)
Mike Schatzki attempts to alter the view of modern society that being overweight (or fat) is equivalent to being unhealthy. By applying multiple peer-reviewed studies the author details how fitness is a more correct indicator of health than weight. The main study focused on in this book is one that details, with the use of graphs, that being fit greatly reduce death rate regardless of weight. The author defines fit as walking 10,000 steps a day and provides research on how this number was determined.

I appreciate the effort made in debunking the myth that health can be measure in terms of weight or BMI. By providing a simple solution for a life of fitness by walking 10,000 steps a day, the author simplifies fitness and makes it obtainable for everyone. The book stresses that one should move at his or her own pace with no timeline for reaching the goal steps. We tend to overly complicate fitness, so I think that offering a simplistic solution is valuable. One of the reasons people don't commit to a fitness routine is because the manner in which it is marketed makes it feel too time consuming and difficult. My favorite part of the book comes when the author offers a solution for the argument that there is not enough time to walk 10,000 steps. He does not tell readers to make it a priority but rather a necessity in which other things should be scheduled around. What a great solution and one we could all benefit from.

There are several other things I appreciated about this book. The endnotes are very detailed and provide not only the article in which you can look up the research for yourself but the area the information can be found in each research paper. The book is short and easy to read. All medical jargon is adequately explained in layman's terms. The additional website provides deeper insight into thoughts presented within the book.

My biggest beef with this book is the fact that it neglects to take into account diet in any form. While I agree that fitness levels play a vital role in health, I feel that research has shown that what one puts into his or her body is equally important. The author emphasizes that our bodies were designed to exercise by hunting and gathering but neglects to mention that they weren't designed to digest all that fast-food or processed food that we put into them. There is also no mention of additional benefits from developing muscle by adding to a walking fitness routine. Our bodies were designed to work and be more muscular than most are now. Muscle burns more calories and small amounts of muscle mass can be added without working out hours each day.

Another point that the book does not detail is the amount of morbidly obese people who are actually fit. I would venture a guess that there are quite a few people who would be classified as obese, BMI above 25, that are physically fit but how many people with a BMI above 30, classified as morbidly obese, are fit? If these people walked the recommended 10,000 steps each and every day they are likely to see a drop in their weight. If the author truly wants to make the point that weight does not correlate with health then some actual numbers in this area would be quite beneficial.

Overall this book is a great starting point but is by no means the end-all be-all to healthy living. The suggestion to walk 10,000 steps each day is a simple step people may take to becoming more healthy. Yet how we fuel our bodies should also be included. A short chapter on one to three simple eating changes would add a great deal of value to the book.
(Book provided free for an honest review.)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Definitely worth a read, January 14, 2012
By 
Geoff Puterbaugh (Chiang Mai, T. Suthep, A. Muang Thailand) - See all my reviews
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This book agrees with a few other "honest" books I have read in my life. One of them was What You Can Change and What You Can't: The Complete Guide to Successful Self-Improvement, and another one, read long ago, pointed out that the amount of exercise needed to be fit was usually way over-estimated. That author pointed out that a high-school teacher, walking from class to class and making sure to remain standing for two classes, was very likely "already there," compared with a computer programmer who remains sitting all day and then drives home.

For this book, it's 10,000 steps a day, and you're probably doing 4,000 already. Keeping up this level of activity and fitness will cut your morbidity rate by 50%, and it's MUCH better than losing weight and staying on the couch. Not only that, if you lose some weight and continue with your moderate exercise program, the weight is very likely to STAY OFF --- which is really the name of the game for most people.

Of course, if joint problems etc. rule out doing that much walking, go swimming instead!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Important New Insights about Our Bodies' Set Points for Keeping Weight Off, December 6, 2011
This review is from: The Great Fat Fraud: Why the "Obesity Epidemic" Isn't, How to Be Totally Healthy without Losing Weight and If You Should Lose Some Pounds, How to Keep Them from Finding You Again (Paperback)
Author Mike Schatzki is revolutionary in his thesis that the obesity epidemic is overblown by the diet industry. In essence, he says it is OK to be fat as long as you are fit, citing tons of studies to back up the concept that being overweight doesn't shorten your life ... as long as you keep in shape by walking at least 10,000 steps a day.

I have read hundreds of diet and nutrition books. Yet I read this book straight through, as I was learning new material in several chapters. The most interesting point of all: the body has not one, but TWO set points for weight. One he calls the "Internal Director of Storing Fat" and it stores up fat reserves when it "thinks" there is so much food available that you don't have to expend energy looking for it. In other words, when you don't exercise, your body thinks it's time to store fat for future famines!

The other he calls the "Internal Director of Gathering Food." This is when you are doing a lot of walking, which the body interprets as hunting and gathering. In this case, your body will not store too much fat because it knows that if it gets fat, it will expend too much energy in lugging itself around.
Mike warns us to build up to the 10,000 steps a day by adding only 500 per day. He knows we will be tempted to slack off, so he gives the analogy of picking up our kid at school. Is this a PRIORITY, or is it a REQUIREMENT? We have to take the same attitude with our body--taking our body for a walk is a crucial as picking the kid up from school! Great point. This attitude has worked for me; I have exercised at least four days a week for the past 36 years, and usually six days a week. And I can tell you it becomes such a strong habit you don't want to miss it--the benefits are so great that it's more important than eating at times.

I am in total agreement when Mike blasts the drug companies for their toxic weight loss pills, as well as the absurdity of the lucrative yet dangerous stomach stapling business. He goes into great detail here, and I couldn't agree more. I also now am convinced that his attitude of "fitness being more important than dieting" is also true.

However there is one point I strongly disagree with: the concept that people who are fit have the same chance of dying regardless of their weight. I think for those who are 20 or 30 pounds overweight, this may be true. And maybe for the "mildly obese." But for those who are "morbidly obese" this simply doesn't apply. Fat tissue has been recently found to function like an endocrine gland, sending hormonal messages. It messes with our leptin and insulin, important hormones that regulate health and weight. Besides, the longest living folks have been found to be those who eat lightly, such as in Okinawa, Japan. Digestion simply drains the body--especially when it's cooked foods without enzymes.

In short, I agree that fitness (especially walking) should be the first priority, even above dieting. But we do want to get to our ideal weight. And by fine tuning those set point through walking, we can lose weight and KEEP it off.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Will open your eyes, January 28, 2013
By 
NutrProfE (Cleveland, OH) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Great Fat Fraud: Why the "Obesity Epidemic" Isn't, How to Be Totally Healthy without Losing Weight and If You Should Lose Some Pounds, How to Keep Them from Finding You Again (Paperback)
Don't let the breezy tone fool you --this book is based on solid biomedical research. Stop worrying about your weight and focus on Healthy living.
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4.0 out of 5 stars I'd Rather Be At The Beach: Reviews, June 25, 2012
By 
This review is from: The Great Fat Fraud: Why the "Obesity Epidemic" Isn't, How to Be Totally Healthy without Losing Weight and If You Should Lose Some Pounds, How to Keep Them from Finding You Again (Paperback)
In this book, Mike Schatzki tells us that it doesn't really matter what size you are, that as long as you're active, you're healthy. He says that size doesn't matter, and that a person with an average BMI, but who is sedentary, is more at risk for health problems than a person with a high BMI who moves a lot (walk, climb stairs etc), and that they cut their healh risks by 50%. That makes perfect sense to me. But...I also believe that being within your ideal weight range cuts your health risks too.

There's a lot of info in this book, like how to reach the recommended 10,000 steps a day, how to make exercise a priority, by-pass surgery, weight loss drugs and weight loss programs. Some of subjects are just a few pages, some are a little more, but they all have info that will help anyone trying to get fit. I especially like the "Magic" section because I've always been leary of magic weight loss and fitness cures.

At the end of the book you'ff find a BMI chart, 2 Balke Treadmill Protocol charts (one for women, one for men), and a Working With Your Podometer section, and an Index.

Overall this was an interesting book and I would recommend it to anyone who wants another point of view on how to become a more fit and/or healthier person.
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