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The Great Hunt: Book Two of 'The Wheel of Time' Paperback – June 5, 2012


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Frequently Bought Together

The Great Hunt: Book Two of 'The Wheel of Time' + The Dragon Reborn: Book Three of 'The Wheel of Time' + The Eye of the World: Book One of 'The Wheel of Time'
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Product Details

  • Series: Wheel of Time (Book 2)
  • Paperback: 656 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; Second Edition edition (June 5, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780765334343
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765334343
  • ASIN: 0765334348
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.4 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (817 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #44,483 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Chosen by fate to become the Dragon Reborn--savior and destroyer of his world--young Rand al'Thor attempts to outrun his destiny by joining in a mad search for the lost Horn of Valere. Continuing the story begun in The Eye of the World ( LJ 2/15/90), Jordan creates a lush, sprawling tapestry of a novel in the tradition of Tolkien and Eddings. Recommended where fantasy is popular.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“Jordan has come to dominate the world Tolkien began to reveal.”  —The New York Times

More About the Author

Robert Jordan was born in 1948 in Charleston, South Carolina. He taught himself to read when he was four with the incidental aid of a twelve-years-older brother and was tackling Mark Twain and Jules Verne by five. He is a graduate of The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, with a degree in physics. He served two tours in Vietnam with the U.S. Army; among his decorations are the Distinguished Flying Cross with bronze oak leaf cluster, the Bronze Star with "V" and bronze oak leaf cluster, and two Vietnamese Gallantry Crosses with palm. A history buff, he has also written dance and theater criticism and enjoyed the outdoor sports of hunting, fishing, and sailing, and the indoor sports of poker, chess, pool, and pipe collecting.

Robert Jordan began writing in 1977 and went on to write The Wheel of Time(R), one of the most important and best selling series in the history of fantasy publishing with over 14 million copies sold in North America, and countless more sold abroad.

Robert Jordan died on September 16, 2007, after a courageous battle with the rare blood disease amyloidosis.

Customer Reviews

Great plot and characters and very well written.
Amazon Customer
As with the first book, all the characters are well developed and involved in the story line.
Anna van Heerden
I first read the first book of THE wheel of time series in 1995.
John D. Elder

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

159 of 177 people found the following review helpful By 718 Session on October 15, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I Promise: I'm going to be spoiler free.
This is the second book in the Wheel of Time (WOT) series (after Eye of the World). It is BETTER than the first one. Jordan is really finding his legs with the series. All of the tenants of excellent fantasy are here. Jordan is a great writer who builds an incredible world with a compelling history. His characters are also incredible.
Great Hunt is a great book, but be warned: as of this writing Jordan hasn't finished WOT. The Great Hunt does not stand alone, the ending is something of a cliffhanger. My guess is the end of this series isn't going to happen until 2006 (I believe there are going to be 12 books, but I don't think there's an official word).
Is it going to be worth it? I don't think so. WOT has gotten very complicated and is becoming turgid. Sometime around Book 6, the action began to crawl. Book 8 (the last one I read) was almost 700 pages and took place over three days, AND was practically missing some important characters!
I've read the first five books twice now beacuse it is too difficult to wait a year between reading books. (And he's coming out with them once every other year at this point).
My advice: Wait until Jordan's finished them all. It's best to read them one after another. By then we'll know if it was worth the wait.
You've been warned!
My grade for the series:
1. Wheel of Time: A-
2. Great Hunt: A
3. Dragon Reborn: A+
4. Shadow Rising: A+
5. Fires of Heaven: A
6. Lord of Chaos: B
7. Crown of Swords: C+
8. Path of Daggars: C
9. Winter's Heart (haven't read, waiting for Jordon to finish)
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52 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Paul on November 29, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The second book in Robert Jordan's epic "Wheel of Time" saga is another fantastic book in this series. Set in the most vivid fantasy world ever created, Jordan takes readers further into this world, weaving new plotlines, introducing new characters and growing the roles of characters first met in "The Eye of the World". This series continues to work on multiple levels, containing nuances which have clearly been missed by the few critics of this series. (Critics of this series often focus on its length, reminding one of the emporer in "Amadeus", who complained that Mozart's concert had "too many notes.")
In the first book, Rand, Perrin and Mat, 3 young men from the village of Emond's Field were forced to flee from minions of the Dark One, accompanied by Egwene, a village girl who wanted adventure, and Thom Merrilin, a gleeman who had come to the village to entertain at the village's spring festival. Guided by Moiraine, a member of the mysterious order of Aes Sedai, women who can channel "saidar", the female half of the One Power, and Lan, Moiraine's Warder, the group was soon joined by Nynaeve, the village's Wisdom, who had followed them to protect the young people from her village who had been had been swept up in an Aes Sedai "scheme". The group, minus Thom, would eventually be joined by Loial, an young member of the long-lived race of Ogier, a gentle giant of a bookworm who had left home to see the world.
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41 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Craig MACKINNON on July 30, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
After the skill, fun, and sheer size of the first book in the Wheel of Time series, I eagerly looked forward to the second book. I won't say I was disappointed - many authors slip a little in a second book in the series - the book is nowhere near the fun, the pace, or the interest of the first book. The story: the Horn of Valere is stolen by Darkfriends, as is Mat's soul-stealing dagger. Lord Ingtar takes charge of a group of Shienar's finest in an effort to find and retreive the artifacts. Our three male heroes - Rand, Perrin, and Mat - go along with the Lancers. Meanwhile, our two female heroes - Nynaeve and Egwene - accompany the Aes Sedai witch to Tar Valon, the stronghold of the Aes Sedai, to start their training.

So, what is the problem with the book? Firstly, Jordan felt the need to "regress" his characters somewhat. One would think that the boys and girls who had crossed the world, defended the Eye of the World from the evil one, and had survived numerous battles, would have gained in maturity. And they do so throughout the first book, but their characters are back in their mid-EotW form at the beginning of the second book. Mat is childishly selfish, Egwene is wide-eyed innocent, Nynaeve is a petulant bully, etc. In fact, they stay at this stunted level of development through most of this book. The character of Nynaeve is especially hard to take - she consistently holds to ideas she has seen proven false, she tries to bully everyone into agreeing with her and vows awful revenge when they don't, etc. And yet all the characters seem to think she's wonderful, including the ageless Warder king-heir who must have better offers from scullery maids than the histrionics Nynaeve consistently offers. Yet he is supposed to be in love with her? Did I miss something?
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