Buy New
$16.14
Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.95
  • Save: $2.81 (15%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Trade in your item
Get a $0.51
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Great Infidel: A Life of David Hume Paperback – July 3, 2006


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$49.95
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.14
$15.97 $11.98


Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Birlinn Ltd; 1st Edition Thus edition (July 3, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841585203
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841585208
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.2 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #738,158 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'a tremendous, sometimes mischievous piece of work' - The Herald 'fine and sensitive, rather than dry and academic, it is a fitting tribute to one of Scotland's greatest men' - The Daily Mail

About the Author

Roderick Graham was educated at the Royal High School of Edinburgh and Edinburgh University before serving with the Royal Army Education Corps as Staff Officer (Education) East Africa Command. He subsequently enjoyed a long and varied career in television and radio as a writer, freelance director and producer, and worked for a period as Head of Drama for BBC TV Scotland. He has also taught writing and directing at Napier and Leeds Metropolitan Universities, Edinburgh College of Art and Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama. He is the author of the critically acclaimed John Knox: Democrat (Hale, 2001) and The Great Infidel: A Life of David Hume. He lives in Edinburgh.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Cowley on July 22, 2011
Format: Paperback
Contrary to another reviewer, I enjoyed reading this book, but then I'm from Edinburgh. The author has taken the trouble to visit the places where Hume stayed in France and tells his life story as a historian, diplomat and man of letters well. He writes well on his early life at Chirnside and his youthful reading, for example of Pierre Bayle's Historical and Critical Dictionary. He also has much to say on his loss of faith, his life in Paris as a diplomat where he was feted and his acquaintance with Alison Cockburn, which he relates to his return to Edinburgh.

He is less sure-footed when he speculates on Hume's philosophy as it becomes evident that he has not studied the subject in any great depth and his speculations on motives thus lack authority. He presents Hume as a genial man, but this leads him to like his ideas rather than to engage with them. Overall, it both shorter and more accurate than Mossner's Life of David Hume. I read Hume years ago at University and felt I had learned from this work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By S. Matthews on February 1, 2012
Format: Paperback
David Hume, it is generally agreed, was about as attractive a man as ever lived. He had a gift for friendship, he was witty, and he was kind; he inspired almost universal affection in people he met. This is an affectionate biography of that man. However if David Hume had been only a genial buffer from Edinburgh, then 250 years after he died there would be at most local antiquarian interest in his life. But Hume was not just a genial buffer; he was intellectually threatening; that he was a genial buffer was incidental. Peter Gay wrote in his history of the enlightenment that 'when Johnson and Boswell talked about him, they talked about him with an unphilosophical aversion that smacks almost of fear'.

You get very little feeling for why Hume was so threatening from this book. You get the man, but you do not get the philosopher or the historian. You are told that he was not quite an atheist but that he was an honest man. But there is no adequate explanation of why someone supposedly shouted that out at his funeral, or why his family felt that an armed guard was necessary on his grave to prevent it being desecrated. The problem is that Graham is not really sophisticated about either philosophy or historiography. He dismisses Berkeley, for instance, as a comic footnote to philosophy apparently because he finds Berkeley's idealism ridiculous. He seems not to have realised that comic footnotes to do not get extensive discussion in randomly chosen one-volume histories of philosophy (you may not accept Berkeley's brand of full-bore subjective idealism but finding a flaw in its intellectual defenses is a serious philosophical challenge).
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By M. Burke on May 1, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The content is so difficult to access in this ponderously written text. For a biographer and an historian (which presumably the author is) to use so many suppositions is appalling. The first three chapters abound with unsupportable statements such as 'David probably thought...', 'he must have felt...' , 'his family undoubtedly...' . It is a real battle to wade through this book and I only did so because I was desperate to know about Hume.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Strato on December 31, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a highly readable biography of Hume. Even those who may have read little of his life will enjoy this account. The great champion of a science of human nature was a thoroughly human and sympathetic man. Graham's book will prove this to all.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?