Qty:1
  • List Price: $20.00
  • Save: $4.91 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 14 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by -Daily Deals-
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This Book is in Good Condition. Used Copy With Light Amount of Wear. 100% Guaranteed.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Great Tradition: Classic Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being Paperback – January 15, 2009


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.09
$12.66 $10.00
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

The Great Tradition: Classic Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being + The Great Books: A Journey through 2,500 Years of the West’s Classic Literature + Climbing Parnassus: A New Apologia for Greek and Latin
Price for all three: $45.21

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 690 pages
  • Publisher: Intercollegiate Studies Institute; 2nd Edition edition (January 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 193519156X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1935191568
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1.7 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #81,989 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The Great Tradition provides a treasury of insights into Western education that no school leadership can afford to ignore. Something will speak to everybody with a mildly curious mind: headmasters who want help with the curriculum (Quintilian), parents who want to raise wise and virtuous children (Chrysostom), lovers of the classics (Philip Melanchthon), students setting life goals (Basil The Great), teachers who want help focusing their efforts (Aristotle), the historically curious (from Plato to C. S. Lewis), and board members setting priorities (Paul Elmer More). Every now and then someone does the world the invaluable favor of reminding us how we got here and what we’ve left behind. Richard M. Gamble has done so for a new generation."
Andrew Kern, President, CiRCE Institute, and coauthor of Classical Education, The Movement Sweeping America


"An impressive new volume of selected readings which trace the thread of education as it is woven into our cultural fabric, spanning more than 2,000 years, from the ancient Greeks to contemporary writers....Gamble has delivered a rich resource for families, teachers and schools —yes, even public schools, if they would use it. Home educators are certain to find it an invaluable addition to their library."
Randall Murphree, American Family Association


"Masterfully edited by Gamble, [this] is a unique anthology best described in the term given by Mortimer Adler years ago--conversation… 'Anticipating the objections of critics who allege that the classical and Christian traditions are not useful in the modern world, Gamble declares, The Great Tradition, in contrast, anchored in the classical and Christian humanism of liberal education, has taken the broader view that what is useful is that which helps men and women to flourish in nonmaterial ways as well--in other words, that which helps them to be happy…' If there is any hope for an educational Renaissance, especially within the liberal arts, it will have to occur with a sense of the authentic and primarily formative education exemplified by the readings in this book."
Journal of the Faith and the Academy

About the Author

Richard M. Gamble is the Anna Margaret Ross Alexander Professor of History and Political Science and Associate Professor of History at Hillsdale College. He formerly taught in the Honors Program at Palm Beach Atlantic University and is the author of The War for Righteousness: Progressive Christianity, the Great War, and the Rise of the Messianic Nation (ISI Books, 2003).
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Richard M. Gamble is Associate Professor of History and Anna Margaret Ross Alexander Chair in History and Political Science at Hillsdale College in Hillsdale, Michigan. He also directs Hillsdale's honors program. His teaching has been recognized with the Emily Daugherty Award for Teaching Excellence and twice with the Curtis A. Seichter Endowed History Award. He is a contributing editor at The American Conservative and serves on the editorial board of Humanitas, a publication of the National Humanities Institute. His essays and reviews have appeared in The American Conservative, Humanitas, The Journal of Southern History, Historically Speaking, The Intercollegiate Review, Modern Age, The University Bookman, The Independent Review, and other publications.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 10 customer reviews
Highly recommended, especially for public and college libraries.
Midwest Book Review
It's been truly enlightening and refreshing to read the so many great thoughts and ideas on the topic of education.
Jaroslav Melgr
Note that if you have read much classic philosophy/theology there will be some overlap.
D Arthur

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Bradley J. Birzer on February 18, 2008
Format: Hardcover
One of the finest works of Christian Humanist scholarship to come out in the last decade, Dr. Gamble's new book, The Great Tradition, should open forgotten but vital realms of the past to the modern reader. Expertly chosen selections--forming the narrative and educational backbone of western civilization--pull the past, the present, and the future back into continuity. Dr. Gamble lovingly and painstakingly introduces us to a vast treasury of wisdom from Plato, Cicero, Seneca, Tacitus, St. Augustine, St. Gregory the Great, John of Salisbury, St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Bonaventure, Petrarch, Melanchthon, John Calvin, Edmund Burke, Cardinal Newman, Paul Elmer More, T.S. Eliot, and Christopher Dawson, to name just a few of the authors. Truly, Gamble ably demonstrates, one can find a direct line of thought and a continuing conversation transcending the generations about the most vital questions regarding the nature, limitations, and potential of our humanity. Indeed, Gamble, a true scholar and gentleman, understands liberal education in its proper sense. A proper education liberates the human person from the tyranny of the moment, allowing him to see the wisdom of the human race across time, the cardinal virtues, and the Good, the True, and the Beautiful. Most importantly, an educated person sees behind all of these things the One who made them each not only possible but also desirable.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on November 3, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Historian Richard M. Gamble edits The Great Tradition: Classic Readings on What It Means to be an Educated Human Being is an anthology of essays written by great figures throughout history concerning what it truly means to be educated. Since ancient times, the Great Tradition has described education as the hard work the human soul undergoes in order to better understand itself and its maker. Individual writings quote Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, John Calvin, C.S. Lewis, T.S. Eliot, and many other historical, literary, religious, and scientific figures concerning the goals and true value of education. Each selection is prefaced by a brief yet insightful commentary about the author's life and identity, as well as comments about the selection itself and why it was chosen. The result is a cohesive picture offering much-needed insights into the ever-evolving education system, its purpose and its needs, particularly in today's era of debate concerning public schools and the rise of homeschooling. Highly recommended, especially for public and college libraries.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By G. L. Gregg on November 30, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Richard Gamble has accomplished a Herculean task that we should hope bears fruit worthy of his efforts. Between the covers of this large, but very moderately priced book, is the distillation of thousands of years of thinking about education and what it is to be an educated human being. Every parent, teacher, and educational administrator who is truly concerned about educating our youth, would do well to have this book at hand. Let us hope Gamble's work becomes the inspiration for a new wave of educational reform in America that undoes some of the most damaging trends of the 20th century.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jaroslav Melgr on October 21, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a wonderful resource for any student of education. It is an anthology of articles, essays and other works from some of the world's greatest minds all reflecting on the topic of education. The authors range from Plato, Aristotle and other ancient Greeks, to Romans, early Christian thinkers, to medieval and renaissance scholars, to modern-day writers such as C.S. Lewis and Dorothy Sayers.

I'm thankful to Richard Gamble for having the courage and gumption to wade through what must no doubt have been heaps of material to come up with this 658 page volume. It's been truly enlightening and refreshing to read the so many great thoughts and ideas on the topic of education. My personal dissatisfaction with our current educational system left me wanting for alternatives. After many years of unsuccessful attempts to make public education fill at least the basic needs of our children, we've finally resorted to home schooling. And consequently, we've been looking not just home school curriculum but primarily for ideas about education. And this book is full of precious ideas and wonderful thoughts.

The fact that so many great thinkers over the past 2,500 years emphasize the same ideas and stress the need to teach the basics is reassuring. This is precisely what's missing in our system. Grammar, rhetoric, logic, mathematics, music and other liberal arts (trivium, quadrivium and beyond) truly form the foundation for future education. They aren't the end, but the means to learning. It's said that they initiate the young to the art of learning. Yet today's system tries to teach "advanced" curriculum to students who have no foundation and thus no chance to truly learn.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Patrice Fagnant-macarthur VINE VOICE on April 25, 2008
Format: Hardcover
"The Great Tradition" is a heavy tome, both in its size and the material it covers, but it is an important contribution to the field of education. Richard Gamble has assembled excerpts of works on education from the past 2500 years. Beginning with Plato, and including such notables as Aristotle, Origen, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, John Milton, John Henry Newman, and T.S. Eliot, the writers offer their insights into what they feel is the true purpose of education, and how best to go about that aim. What is perhaps the most interesting feature of this collection is that many of these writers were struggling with the same educational issues we struggle with today. It is somehow comforting to learn that people 2000 years ago were equally concerned about the state of education and the proper way to raise children. "The Great Tradition" would be a great addition to a college class on educational theory. It also makes for valuable reading for anyone interested in the very important question of "what makes an educated human being?"
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?