The Greatest Game Ever Played 2005 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

(317) IMDb 7.5/10
Available in HD

True story of a caddy's unlikely rise to the top of the game.

Starring:
Shia LaBeouf, Michael Weaver
Runtime:
2 hours 1 minute

Available in HD on supported devices.

The Greatest Game Ever Played

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Sports, Drama
Director Bill Paxton
Starring Shia LaBeouf, Michael Weaver
Supporting actors Armand Laroche, Peter Hurley, Gregory Terlecki, Jonathan Higgins, Matthew Knight, Luke Askew, Amanda Tilson, Elias Koteas, Jamie Merling, Eugenio Esposito, Marnie McPhail, Stephen Dillane, Robin Wilcock, Peter Firth, Michael Sinelnikoff, Shia LaBeouf, Justin Ashforth, Arthur Holden
Studio Walt Disney Pictures
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

This movie is one of the best I've ever seen.
Dixie Lee Tripp
Good film about a golfer anyone who loves the game, or even just likes it more than bit, should know more about.
Craig Matteson
Our family fell in love with this movie and we have watched it 4 times already!
CS

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

88 of 89 people found the following review helpful By chefdevergue VINE VOICE on October 1, 2005
One doesn't have to have read Mark Frost's book (he adapted his book for the screenplay) to enjoy this movie. Obviously, the book contains much more detail regarding the personal histories of Harry Vardon, Francis Ouimet, JJ McDermott & others leading up to (and following) the 1913 US Open, and there was no way that Frost could have included all of the minute detail without at least doubling the length of the movie. One also misses the discussion of the technology available to the turn-of-the-century golfer, as well as some of the geo-political forces that led to Vardon & Ted Ray making their tour of the United States.

However, what one does get is a beautifully filmed story that has the predictable feel-good nature one would expect from a Disney film, without being sappy. The principals bear a striking resemblance to the historical figures (right down to Eddie the caddie), and the historical match is accurately rendered. While one doesn't get the book's stroke by stroke narrative, one does get to enjoy the energy of the galleries as well as the immense pressures bearing down on the tournament leaders.

I only have a couple of significant complaints about the movie. One is with the wholy fictional relationship (concocted for the purposes of this film) between Francis Ouimet and the upper class young lady. It smacks uncomfortably of Jack-Rose relationship in Titanic, and when the movie focuses on this relationship, it skates dangerously close to outright corniness. Fortunately, once the tournament begins, this subplot is thankfully relegated to the background. By & large it interferes only minimally with the story.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Carolyn Rowe Hill on May 15, 2006
Format: DVD
If you love golf, you'll love this movie. Even if you don't love golf, you'll enjoy it. The cinematography is phenomenal. The makers of this movie used a specially designed camera in many scenes to follow the ball from shot to stop. One of my favorite shots was Ted Ray's blast through the woods, between the trees, and onto the green with the camera following the ball all the way! As others have said, it's the best golf movie yet, largely because the camera work and film editing added much to the magic of this true come-from-behind story. I also think the close working relationship between director Bill Paxton and the author of the book, The Greatest Game Ever Played, Mark Frost, added to the movie's charm and authenticity.

Francis Ouimet and Harry Vardon had something in common. They were `common', according to the societal standards of their respective times. One is American, the other English, born a generation apart. Vardon grew up to become a world-renowned golfer, but could never join "the club" in his own homeland because he came from the underclass. However, he did become a hero to growing boys in Europe and America, including young Francis Ouimet, who grew up across the street from the Country Club in Brookline, Massachusetts. Francis began caddying at a tender age, and there were those who saw something special in him. These gentlemen, and Ouimet's mother (at least in the movie), encouraged him to take his love of golf from the caddie stage to the player's arena. With the odds against him from several directions, he played his way into the hearts and minds of his American countrymen and the world, and into the record books, by playing as an amateur in the 1913 U.S. Open and winning.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
44 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Delirium on April 11, 2006
Format: DVD
We watched this movie in the theaters with the whole family, including two kids under 10. I'm not a golfer, but my husband loves the sport. The movie has great story line, funny moments, a bit of romance and some thrilling episodes. It would make for a nice evening of quality family time.

Please note that the DVD is in widescreen format. That's the only reason I'm not buying it at this time, I'm hoping for a full screen version.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Waitsel Smith on May 22, 2006
Format: DVD
To fully appreciate THE GREATEST GAME EVER PLAYED, it's good to compare it with BOBBY JONES, STROKE OF GENIUS. Both films cost between $20M and $25M. Both were about the game of golf at the turn of the 20th century. Both focused on young, underprivileged underdogs who went on to become the best amateurs in the game, beating out their professional competition. And both show the influence of the great Harry Vardon.

BOBBY JONE, STROKE OF GENIUS, of course, is about Bobby Jones, only amateur ever to win all three tournaments of the Grand Slam in the same year. And he did it while also working on three college degrees simultaneously - thus the "Genius." Jim Caviezel (Passion of the Christ) did a decent job playing Bobby, although he didn't look anything like the man. And Aiden Quinn was good as Harry Vardon - even down to his golfing ability - although he was all but cut from the film because he wouldn't shave a goatee he had grown for another film.

While BOBBY JONES is about an entire golf career, THE GREATEST GAME EVER PLAYED is about one tournament: the 1913 US Open, held at Brookline Country Club in Brookline, Massachusetts. That was the year that a caddie - Francis Ouimet, who lived across the street from the country club - beat the two top British professionals, including Harry Vardon, and won the tournament - the biggest upset in golf history. Shia LeBeouf (Holes) does a great job playing Ouimet, and Stephen Dillane (The Hours) is superb as Vardon.

The biggest difference between these two films is in the direction. With BOBBY JONES, Rowdy Herrington (Road House) opted to do a very straight drama in the tradition of Chariots of Fire. It turned out to be far more than he could handle. The script is weak.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search