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The Green Beauty Guide: Your Essential Resource to Organic and Natural Skin Care, Hair Care, Makeup, and Fragrances Paperback – September 2, 2008


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The Green Beauty Guide: Your Essential Resource to Organic and Natural Skin Care, Hair Care, Makeup, and Fragrances + Organic Body Care Recipes: 175 Homemade Herbal Formulas for Glowing Skin & a Vibrant Self + The Naturally Clean Home: 150 Super-Easy Herbal Formulas for Green Cleaning
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: HCI; 8.9.2008 edition (September 2, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0757307477
  • ISBN-13: 978-0757307478
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #346,854 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this thorough, practical guide, writer and registered nutrition specialist Gabriel (Clear Skin) recommends subjecting everyday cosmetics to the same scrutiny with which we subject our food: "each cosmetic chemical ends up in thousands of hungry mouths covering our skin-pores." Navigating labels is a true problem, because cosmetics come under no government regulation, unlike food and drugs; as such, skin products sold as "natural" or "organic" may contain numerous unsafe chemicals, with a few token ingredients to justify their claims. Gabriel provides a list of dangerous ingredients to watch out for (and why), identifies the safest products on the market (free from "synthetic dyes, fragrances, preservatives or detergents"), and takes readers step-by-step through cleansers, toners, facials, moisturizers, sunscreen, hair care and baby care. Her sophisticated daily regimen (two daily cleansings, exfoliation, toning, moisturizing and sun screen) may be too much for some readers, but those with the wherewithal will also find some useful, surprising tips for home-brewed cosmetics (eggs for masks, lemon and sour cream for exfoliants, organic mayonnaise for a moisturizer and foot mask). Though aimed at women, Gabriel also covers products used by men and children, including shaving cream, soap, shampoo and powders.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Julie Gabriel is a registered nutrition specialist (RHN) educated at the Canadian School of Natural Nutrition. She launched a series of workshops titled 'New Mom's Diet' in Toronto. She is in the process of launching her own organic skincare line called Petite Marie Organics. Julie has been writing and editing fashion and beauty for about 15 years. In 1992 she worked in production at CNN's Style with Elsa Klensch. She was the associate beauty editor in Harper's Bazaar (Eastern European editions, 1998-2000), beauty editor in Atmospheres (2001-2001) and has written over five hundred articles and features on fashion, beauty and lifestyle.

More About the Author

Julie Gabriel is a holistic nutritionist, the author, and the founder of Petite Marie Organics (www.petitemarieorganics.com) natural skincare range for acne-prone, problem and sensitive skin.

Julie's fascination with beauty began nearly twenty years ago. As a beauty writer and editor she worked at such amazing publications as Harper's Bazaar, L'Officiel de la Mode et de la Couture, Atmospheres, WWD, and many more - including Style with Elsa Klensch (CNN) in the early 1990s.

When Julie's daughter was born, Gabriel has trained as a holistic nutritionist at Canadian School for Natural Nutrition. "I believe that cosmetic products are food for our skin, and if you take great care to eat healthy, wholesome foods, you must treat your skin and hair with the same respect," says Julie.

Customer Reviews

The DIY recipes are great, and the information is explained very well.
K Newman
The Green Beauty Guide explains all those ingredients in your personal care products.
Leona Bluhm
I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in making a difference.
Monie Garcia

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

382 of 390 people found the following review helpful By Alexandra on August 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book is enlightening -- it includes thorough dictionaries of both beneficial and potentially harmful cosmetic ingredients -- but the writer seems to be schizophrenic or to have not thoroughly researched the topic, which, as a former journalist, is highly concerning. I was disappointed with her recommendations of products by Avalon Organics, JASON Naturals, Stella McCartney CARE, and Kiss My Face. These brands are hardly superior and were sued by Dr. Bronner's last year for deceptively using the word "organic" and containing petro ingredients. However, the writer later retracted her recommendation of the Kiss My Face brand on her blog.

The retractions continue. She recommends bismuth oxychloride-containing powders by Bare Escentuals in the book (which I was shocked to read since she claims to be a purist) but later says on her blog that bismuth oxychloride can "irritate sensitive skin like mad." Half the people who've used BE and developed red, itchy skin can tell you this. She spends an entire page on avoiding toners with alcohol (duh), then recommends an alcohol-packed toner by Dr. Hauschka.

Speaking of Dr. Hauschka, Ms. Gabriel recommends nearly every Hauschka product made. (By the book's end, one suspects her of having too-close relations with the company.) I respect Dr. Hauschka's biodynamic farming practices, but they use a high amount of alcohol as preservative. Combined with their heavy nut oils (e.g. peanut oil), their pricey products are infamous for breaking people out in milia or causing irritations. There are FAR better organic lines these days.

The book is packed with DIY recipes that require impractical & expensive ingredients, like rose oil, elderflower water, and calendula blossoms.
Read more ›
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50 of 50 people found the following review helpful By doublefueltanker on May 2, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As other reviewers have noted, there are contradictions in this book that undermine it's overall credibility. Here's one that's particularly egregious: On page 189, Gabriel describes lecithin as a "green emulsifier"; yet, in Appendix B ("100 Toxic Cosmetic Ingredients You Don't Want in Your Beauty Products") ingredient #55 is--believe it or not--lecithin. This is inexcusable to me.
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46 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Jeannine Wegmueller on April 30, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I found this book to be a bit trendy. Do American women really have the time to mix their own beauty products? No one I know does. Page 57 warns of celebrity endorsements, yet page 75 refers to all the celebrities who use Suki Naturals. She consistently quotes opinions from the makers of natural products, but they are stated like facts. Conventional products do this too, and it is wrong. She loves Dr. Hauschka mascara in the book, but says it runs on her website. Little things like this bugged me. I did learn about ingredients to avoid so all was not lost.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Gia V. on October 11, 2010
Format: Paperback
Ok, here's the deal. I'm sure that Gabriel's information is very good information, however, it's ALL information. What do I mean by that? Well, the woman goes on and on and on and on about things, almost like a rant really. I love reading, don't get me wrong, but apart from her ranting, she has about two or three recipes in a chapter supposedly about moisturizers. She gives you her opinion on green products and which ones are the best and why, which is ok. But my whole idea of getting this book was to learn to make my own stuff. Some of her recipes are so simple, it's almost an insult to my intelligence. AND she doesn't have a single body butter/lotion recipe anywhere in the book. She has other things, like facial moisturizers and bronzers for body, but no body butter recipes? Really, not even one? Well, no. AND, she says some things that are both contradictory and maybe not even safe. You may want a second opinion on many of her claims.

To be perfectly honest, her book is boring, bland and I got about three recipes out of it. I got over 10 from other books. Not worth my time.
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29 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Monie Garcia VINE VOICE on August 30, 2008
Format: Paperback
From the founder and owner of the organic skin-care line, Petite Marie, comes a revealing look at cosmetics and skin care that the most of the beauty industry would love to keep secret. For instance, all that a product needs to be labeled as "Organic" is a drop of organic essential oil. This is called greenwashing and most greenwashers spend more money on promoting themselves as environmentally friendly than they do on formulating toxin-free, environmentally sound products.

With The Green Beauty Guide, Julie Gabriel starts with the basics of learning all about your skin and guides you through what you should look for in all your beauty products. She teaches you the how tell the difference between a good marketing campaign and truly organic products. You'll also find The Ten Commandments of Green Beauty, How to Go Green Without Going Broke and even recipes for your own organic beauty products such as cleansers, toners, facial masks, moisturizers and even acne zappers with simple easy to find ingredients.

For me, a not so environmentally conscious consumer, the realization what most of us are doing to our skin and the environment was initially a bit intimidating and scary really but Gabriel's information makes it easy to make the green switch. I've already been through my cabinets checking labels and packaging. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in making a difference.
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