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The Green Man : Tales from the Mythic Forest Hardcover – May 27, 2002


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 910L (What's this?)
  • Series: Doyle & Fossey, 3
  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Viking Juvenile; First Edition, First Printing edition (May 27, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670035262
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670035267
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.8 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #703,455 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Michael Cadnum, Jane Yolen, Patricia A. McKillip and 15 others interpret an enduring legend through short stories and poetry in The Green Man: Tales From the Mythic Forest, ed. by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling, illus. by Charles Vess. Brief biographies accompany the work of each author.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Grade 8-Up The image of the "Green Man" is an ancient one as the introduction to this collection makes clear. From the old tales to Tolkien to Susan Cooper's Green Boy (McElderry, 2002), the awakening of nature has fueled many a gripping tale. The 15 stories and 3 poems were written for this book by such diverse authors as Patricia McKillip, Michael Cadnum, and Midori Snyder. Mature themes and an often sophisticated view of the world and how one survives in it characterize many of these selections. The mood is sometimes playful, as in Gregory Maguire's "Fee, Fie, Foe, et Cetera," or mystical as in the Native American story by Carolyn Dunn. No matter what the ambience or the plot underlying each selection, there is a real sense of how powerful nature can be in its various guises. Most readers will skip the introduction and head straight for the stories, but will be rewarded by reading it afterward. Each selection includes a biographical sketch and comments from the author. -Amy Kellman, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, PA
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

The book is a fast read and I enjoyed the stories.
Cynthia M. Caton
His ability to capture the spirit of a story in only a few inches of ink is reason enough to buy this book for me.
K. Carroll
There are some great tales here, ranging from modern to ancient to full out fantasy.
Schtinky

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Barer on September 2, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Here's why I recommend this anthology:
-- It's a terrific bargain. For around the price of a nonillustrated trade paperback [$$$], you get a hardbound book with illustrated dust jacket and chapter headings by master fantasy illustrator Charles Vess.
-- I read the stories in it in order, instead of picking and choosing the authors I liked. I probably haven't done that in a multi-author anthology since I was a teenager (back when giant lizards roamed the Earth).
-- Vess is an Illustrator, in the best sense of the word. He doesn't just draw pretty pictures; he helps tell the stories.
-- Even though this is a theme anthology, and (as others note) there's lots of stories of teens coming of age while lost in the wilderness, the authors have diverse voices. You get different stories, with different teens (some likeable, others detestable), going through a variety of life-changing experiences.
-- Although the stories vary in quality, they're all readable -- even Midori Snyder's story, which left a bad taste in my mouth by tying things up in too neat a bow and giving the hero's girlfriend a highly-annoying speech at the end.
Give it a try!
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Tom Knapp VINE VOICE on July 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling have paid true homage to the spirit of the Green Man in this anthology. Not only do the short stories collected in this hefty volume evoke a true sense of mystery in the wild, but artist Charles Vess -- who publishes much of his work via his own, well-respected Green Man Press -- has provided cover art and incidental illustrations to bring the concept alive.
From top to bottom, front to back, Tales from the Mythic Forest is an excellent collection of stories unearthing the heart of the woodlands, the spirit of the trees and the face of nature.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Cynthia M. Caton on December 23, 2002
Format: Hardcover
At first, I did not realize that 'The Green Man' is a book for young adults. The give-away was when I realized that there was no sex or violence! The book is a fast read and I enjoyed the stories. Some are better than others as is true in most anthologies and a couple are truly inspired. The stories are a nice way to connect with the natural world.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Kelly (Fantasy Literature) VINE VOICE on July 2, 2002
Format: Hardcover
The editorial review hits the nail on the head when it says that most of these stories involve teenagers going into the woods and having some sort of coming-of-age experience. And in this way, many of the stories are similar, since they have similar themes.
However, some of the authors manage to make something fresh and beautiful out of the traditional archetype of kids-lost-in-woods. Delia Sherman contributes a tale of the Faery Queen of Central Park, and the insecure girl who faces her in a battle of wits. Tanith Lee presents probably the darkest of the tales, "Among the Leaves So Green", about two outcast sisters who each have a special destiny. (This one is probably my favorite--it's pure magic.) Emma Bull's "Joshua Tree" is a lovely story about high school, raves, friendship, and mystery. Jane Yolen's poem "Cailleach Bheur" is terrific. For these stories and many more, I recommend this book.
Of course, in all anthologies, there are disappointing stories. Patricia McKillip's "Hunter's Moon" seems like a political rant about hunting and meat-eating. And Gregory Maguire fleshes out Jack (of Beanstalk fame), his mom, his brother, and the harp, while somehow managing to avoid making me care about any of them. They're both good stories by good writers--they just weren't to my taste. The writing is good in all of these stories; there are just a few that aren't for me.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Michele L. Worley on June 13, 2005
Format: Paperback
"In this book, we've asked the writers to journey deep into the Mythic Forest, to bring back tales of those wild lands, and of the creatures who dwell within them. Thus in these pages you'll find witches, wolves, dryads, deer men, a faery or two, and numerous magical spirits of nature..."

- from the editors' preface

Windling's "Introduction" outlines the origins of the archetype of the Green Man and other forest beings.

--

Bell, M. Shayne: Sickly little Maurice Ravel meets "The Pagodas of Ciboure" - creatures out of French legend - on his grandmother's estate, and asks them to heal him. But what can he do for them?

Bull, Emma: The narrator, a girl with a taste for raves who doesn't fit in with either base kids or townies, is busy growing up in a Marine base town on the border of "Joshua Tree" National Park. (The rave reads like a faery celebration, nice touch.)

Cadman, Michael: "Daphne" narrates the tale of Apollo's attempted seduction.

de Lint, Charles: "Somewhere in My Mind There Is a Painting Box" Twenty years ago, two painters walked into the woods covering the hills outside Newford, but only Frank Spain has returned to a world he no longer belongs to. How can he return when he only tagged along with his mentor in the first place? His mentor, who once said "Many times the only painting box I take is in my head."

Dunn, Carolyn: Braided format, one thread following the ill-fated deer hunt of "Ali Anugne O Chash (The Boy Who Was)", the other narrated by the clubfooted girl who loved him but brought about his downfall.
Read more ›
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