The Guardian of All Things: The Epic Story of Human Memory and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $25.99
  • Save: $9.12 (35%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Boss Factory
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: New unread book. Minor shelf wear.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Guardian of All Things: The Epic Story of Human Memory Hardcover – August 21, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-0312620318 ISBN-10: 0312620314 Edition: 1ST

Buy New
Price: $16.87
30 New from $2.47 60 Used from $0.01 1 Collectible from $14.95
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$16.87
$2.47 $0.01
Year-End%20Deals%20in%20Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; 1ST edition (August 21, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312620314
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312620318
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.1 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #116,377 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Health care costs continue to escalate, and every day the news brings us new or conflicting research about cancer treatments, if salt is actually good for you, how much fat is healthy, what role do your genes play in your health. Readers are looking for ways to take control of their health. They are turning increasingly to mindfulness and food as medicine. In the area of nutrition and diet as ways of managing health, for example, Tana Amen (The Omni Diet) writes extensively on how to reverse illness and influence gene expression with the food you eat.” --Marc Andreessen, Web pioneer and venture capitalist

“Ingenious, richly complex account of how humans exchange, record, preserve and manipulate information . . . An original, fascinating scientific history of how human memory and a series of inventions have driven the advance of civilization.” --Kirkus, starred review

“Premier technology writer Malone transforms our understanding of memory, human and artificial. After a vivid account of the evolution of the brain, he charts the developments that enabled our ancestors to acquire language, the first step in sharing memories and knowledge. With informed pleasure in the ingenuity involved, Malone deepens our appreciation for the development of increasingly sophisticated forms of memory preservation, organization, and communication while delving into the personalities and lives of both celebrated and forgotten technical visionaries." --Booklist, starred review 

“In this sweeping and ambitious story . . . Malone celebrates the power of memory and the freedom it provides us while at the same time cautioning us to guard our memories and protect the record of our time in the world.” --Publisher’s Weekly

 

About the Author

MICHAEL S. MALONE is one of the nation’s best-known technology writers. He is the current ABCNews.com “Silicon Insider” columnist and editor-in-chief of the Silicon Valley new site, Edgelings.com. A former New York Times columnist, Malone has also contributed numerous articles and editorials to The Wall Street Journal, The Economist and Fortune. He has also authored and co-authored more than a dozen books, notably the best-selling Virtual Corporation, Bill & Dave and The Future Arrived Yesterday. M alone holds an MBA from Santa Clara University, is an honorary fellow of the Said Business School at Oxford University, and is a Distinguished Friend of Oxford University.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
15
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
2
1 star
0
See all 21 customer reviews
I enjoyed reading about our memories.
M. Frazier
I do wish there were an accompanying web page - links to pictures or to additional details would add to the value of the book.
Upstate New York Reader
This book is easy to read and thorough and very interesting.
Marney

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Paul Tognetti TOP 500 REVIEWER on September 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover
When I spotted "The Guardian of All Things: The Epic Story of Human Memory" at my local library I was positively mesmerized by the topic. However, being a scientifically and technologically challenged individual I wondered if I was going to be able to keep up. Nevertheless I decided to take the plunge. I am very pleased to report that despite the complexity of the subject matter Michael S. Malone has come up with a very readable volume. This history of memory proves to be incredibly enlightening and endlessly fascinating. I simply could not put this book down.

So just what happened during the transformation form Neanderthal to modern man some 50000 years ago in Asia and perhaps around 30000 years ago in Europe? As Michael Malone explains it the Neanderthal brain was totally focused on the present. There was absolutely no language and therefore no memory. Neanderthal man could neither remember the past nor contemplate the future. But over time human beings developed the ability to hear and to make sounds. As homo sapiens continued to evolve over the millennia they could talk, form relationships, create art and tell stories. About 10000 years ago hunter-gathers would give way to an agricultural society. Not only would there be spoken languages but as the result of commerce and trade counting and arithmetic and finally written languages would evolve. And as Malone points out "The ability to write meant the ability to record information to remove something from one's own memory and place it into a cache of synthetic memory where it could remain largely untended until it was needed again. This recorded memory could also be shared with others with a precision never before available with human beings passing messages from one to another.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Book Fanatic TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 22, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This book is wonderful. It's about memory but only a very small portion of the book is about memory in human brains. It's about how humans have collected and stored their collective memory first in language in human brains and then externally in drawings and written language. From there he goes through the collection of memory in clay tablets, animal skins, reeds, and paper and the collection of all of this into vast libraries. The book travels through photography, film, audio, magnetic tape, magnetic disks, chips and microprocessors, the internet, and the rest of the modern digital world.

It's a fascinating journey that is quite unusual. This book has Amazon's "Search Inside" feature so you should take advantage of that to preview its contents. I enjoyed it and I think you will too.

Definitely recommended.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Upstate New York Reader on October 10, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Michael Malone has written a wonderful journey through Western Civilization using the skills and tools needed to past that history from generation to generation as the framework to build his story.

I began reading, expecting to be bored to death. However, I found myself sneaking reading times - staying a bit longer at a restaurant, postponing the start of other tasks, staying up a bit later - all in order to get through the book. Malone begins with the development of speech and moves forward through history.

I found the chapter discussing the "Art of Memory" to be the most fascinating - having never encountered it before. In one chapter the author discusses the influence of well-known inventors, such as Thomas Edison, Thomas Watson, and the work of John Shaw Billings and Herman Hollerith and the development of the Hollerith Punched Card Tabulating Machine in preparation for the 1890 census. In a similar vein, it was also interesting to read the history of George Eastman (the founder of Kodak). Having spent years in the computer industry, it helped to see how the influence of many of these tools also drove the future development of the computer industry. The connections drawn in the book are not always linear - as people living in the same century often influenced each others work - occasionally forcing the author to move in circles as he discusses multiple tools and lives developing tools for recording history.

I do wish there were an accompanying web page - links to pictures or to additional details would add to the value of the book. I can always use Google to find links, but that gives me no way to evaluate the material.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Andrew P. Saulitis on June 10, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Basically a recount of how information was stored extrasomatically in the course of history. Absolutely nothing about somatic (i.e. human) memory processes. The "research" is primarily Wikipedia. In a word, tedious (certainly not "epic").Would have made a decent (B+) term paper (maybe it was) except far too long for what it accomplishes.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Julia Claire on August 12, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Michael Malone does an amazingly accessible and integrated overview of the history of memory from the dawn of human awareness to speculating into the future of artificial intelligence. The scope of perspective one encounters in this book is massive, bringing together biological anthropology, sociology, history, epistemology, science, psychology, information technology, and so much more. I loved reading it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?