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The Guitar Song

September 14, 2010 | Format: MP3

$12.49
Song Title
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3:14
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2:47
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4:29
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Digital Booklet: The Guitar Song
Disc 2
30
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6:22
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2:59
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3:04
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4:02
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5:21
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 14, 2010
  • Release Date: September 14, 2010
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Mercury Nashville
  • Copyright: (C) 2010 Mercury Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:45:38
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0042CYX0A
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (139 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,240 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 41 people found the following review helpful By K. Carlucci on September 18, 2010
Format: Audio CD
We needed Jamey about 15 years ago when country music really started turning to crap. There are many gifted artists out there but they seem to have lost that country "feeling" in their music. The music seems to be going "pop" and being a classic country fan that makes my stomach turn. Jamey has brought that "feeling" back in his songs and the songs that he writes for others. I knew since his first album "The Dollar" that this guy was stone cold country and I have been a loyal follower since. How many new songs on the radio now have the pedal steel guitar in them? None. "The Guitar Song" is some of the best true country music that I have heard in years and I love it. You just can't listen to the first song "Lonely At The Top" (co-written by Keith Whitley, remember him?)without wanting to open up a cold beer and sit back and relax. Thank you Jamey for giving us some awesome country music and I'll be waiting for more to come. I can't wait to see you live soon!!!!!!
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By SPORTS GIFTS on September 14, 2010
Format: Audio CD
In my humble opinion, this singer-song writer is what country music is about. Straight forward lyrics, writeS what he knows and not some creative fantasy with shitkickers on, great renditions of some classic country. Jamey is a breath of fresh air for a music genre that is getting too pop. The torch or country music has been passed on to a new generation.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By DanD VINE VOICE on September 14, 2010
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
The problem with releasing a double album is that not all of the songs are bound to be of the same quality. As amazing as Jamey Johnson's THE GUITAR SONG is, it suffers the same fate. Most of the weaker tunes appear on the second disc (the "White Album"), simply because it isn't as cohesive as the first. "The Black Album" is mostly about economical hard times, living day-to-day (California appears as a theme throughout both discs). The second album eases up a bit; it's by no means a slouch, but just can't keep up with "The Black Album's" haunting depth.

Still, overall, THE GUITAR SONG is easily one of the best country albums released this year (I won't say THE best because, off the top of my head, I can't really remember any others). For such a talented songwriter, Johnson relies on quite a few covers: Keith Whitley's "Lonely at the Top," Kris Kristofferson's "For the Good Times," Mel Tillis's "Mental Revenge," Vern Gosdin's "Set 'Em Up Joe," etc. He re-interprets the songs ("Mental Revenge" is no longer whimsical, but is in fact genuinely disturbing, as the lyrics would suggest) to fit his own sonic vein. Surprisingly, his originals tend to stand toe-to-toe with the classics. "Playing the Part" is a brilliant skewering of California culture (as is "California Riots," which may or may not have political undertones). "Can't Cash My Checks" narrates the contradictory pride often felt at the bad end of poverty, while "Poor Man Blues" hits on the anger. "Macon" is a beautiful Johnson-style power ballad (almost spiritual in nature), while "That's Why I Write Songs" is a haunting ars poetica, featuring just vocals and guitar. (Which leads me to another point: Johnson actually plays on most of these songs; most artists would've left it all up to studio musicians.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By urrrlacher on September 16, 2010
Format: Audio CD
Truly an amazing feat to collaborate, write and produce what could very well be the most significant country album of the last 20-25 years. I was completely exhausted after listing to Guitar Song (though, I think it will be refereed to as the Black & White album). An emotional roller coaster that will make you laugh, cry, think and harken back to days when wit, grit and tenderness were the backbone of country & western.

Tough & Tender, Mean & Sweet, Funny & Sad, Rich & Poor, Good & Evil, Stoned & Sober, Past & Present, Love & Hate, God & Godless, Condemned & Redeemed, Life & Death..........It's all there in Black & White.

A MASTERPIECE!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Terry Mathews on January 27, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Fans of traditional country music found a lot to love in Jamey Johnson's "The Guitar Song" (Mercury Records). The September 2010 release, with its 2-CD "Black Album" and "White Album," peaked at number 1 on the Billboard country album chart and currently sits at number 28.

From the first licks of Keith Whitley's "Lonely at the Top," the first cut on "The Black Album," to the final haunting note of Johnson's own "My Way to You," the lower Alabama native proves there's room for everybody in Nashville.

Johnson's been hailed as the second coming of Waylon Jennings and the heir apparent to Merle Haggard. His strong vocals and stylings bear similarities to both men, to be sure, but Johnson doesn't have to stand in anyone's shadow. He is the real deal and I believe every note he sings.

The legendary Bill Anderson co-wrote the title track, "The Guitar Song," about a pawn shop guitar with a hundred stories to tell.

Johnson teams with Bobby Bare Sr. and Wayd Battle in the achingly beautiful waltz "Cover Your Eyes." Johnson's acoustic guitar and "Cowboy" Eddie Long's steel guitar lend just the right amount of lonely to the track.

On "Rich Man Blues," which Johnson wrote, the former Marine talks through the first part of the lyrics, setting the dark mood.

Hank Cochran's "Set `Em Up, Joe" is one of the break-up songs of all time, and Johnson covers it with memories of sawdust and 1951 jukeboxes loaded with "Hank and Lefty and B-24."

Johnson has mastered the art of the send-up song. In his "Playing the Part," a sideways look at Los Angeles, where "promises break like an egg on the hot asphalt," and people resort to "taking depression pills in the Hollywood hills.
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