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The Guns of Dallas Paperback – May 9, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Aventine Press (May 9, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593302762
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593302764
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,582,242 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Galahad, Patriot, Shooter, Veteran on July 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
An Impressive first novel by this author, who also designed the cover with the type of rifle probably used in the JFK "Hit."

"The Guns of Dallas is a historical novel, a suspenseful What-Might-Have-Happened in Dealey Plaza that day, with two very interesting characters, Daniel Pilgrim, representing Everyman, and the dying hitman, Jimmy Jeremiah (picture Robert DeNiro). Jeremiah tells the news reporter Pilgrim his story, which the newsman doesn't quite believe. But when Pilgrim and Jeremiah travel to Dallas, go around the historical places--which are all still there exactly as they were 40 years ago--and especially up in the Book Depository, you learn the plausibility of the novel's premise. The book is about redemption, about how much of our own History we really don't know about, about Good and Evil, written by an old author whose writings are quite controversial (see above). He writes for the Internet, mostly about JFK and 911,and is pretty quirky, like Jimmy Jeremiah, his protagonist. Funny, I liked the old assassin much better than I liked the newsman. I'd recommend this book as a companion to the book the author mentioned, called "Kill Zone: A Sniper in Dealey Plaza."

One is believable, compelling and suspenseful fiction and the other non-fiction--both written by patriotic veterans.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Greg Birky on August 13, 2005
Format: Paperback
Even if you weren't alive when Kennedy was killed, reading this tight, gripping novel will help you get the big picture of our current state of affairs. The author takes us to places most people don't like to think exist. A word of caution, once you start this read, you will not be able to put it down, the characters and their development throughout the novel keep you riveted to the tale. You can decide for yourself just how much is "fiction". This book should be required reading for everyone under 40!
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By K. Herman on July 8, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book is an incredible murder mystery. I couldn't put it down and found myself thinking about it for days after I finished reading it. Even the main bad guy was a mystery. His personality was complicated but somehow credible. This is a thought-provoking tale.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Douglas Herman on February 14, 2006
Format: Paperback
Where to start? As the author of The Guns of Dallas, I wanted to write an entertaining, eye-popping, fact based account of what likely happened that day in Dealey Plaza, the day JFK was killed. So begins the story of the dying assassin Jimmy Jeremiah and his colorful recollection to news reporter Daniel Pilgrim of what happened that day.

"There were four teams of two each. Eight altogether. Four guns and four spotters," Jeremiah explained.

Months after I wrote those lines, and about a year after reading James Hepburn's (A pseudonym) intriguing book called "Farewell America," I happened to read former US Marine sniper Craig Roberts' book, "Kill Zone: A Sniper Looks At Dealey Plaza." Amazingly, Roberts came to the exact same conclusion as I. Multiple shooters-probably four teams--killed Kennedy.

Not surprisingly, "Farewell America," a French Intelligence authored book written in 1967 about the JFK hit, was banned in America. Of course, lone gunman apologists can never quite explain how a dead Oswald could influence government censorship four years after his death.

A couple of excerpts from The Guns Of Dallas-

"Tell me," said Pilgrim, "Were many people involved?"

Jimmy laughed. "Well, in a conspiracy like this one, you can have lots of people in on it. Maybe hundreds."

"How can a conspiracy to kill the president have hundreds of people involved and not get revealed?"

"Fear."

The reporter looked incredulous. "Fear? Is that all?"

"It's more than enough. Think about it: a hundred people know about a plot to kill a president, even a thousand. Fear of retribution will keep the one person from ratting on the 999.
Read more ›
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Melisse on July 6, 2005
Format: Paperback
The Guns of Dallas is a good first novel. It weaves painstaking historical research with creative license to craft a compelling plot. The characters, real and imagined, are disturbingly believable. A story as dangerous as this could only have been written as fiction. This is a mystery that must be read.
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