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The HDR Book: Unlocking the Pros' Hottest Post-Processing Techniques Paperback – June 11, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-0321776891 ISBN-10: 0321776895 Edition: 1st

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The HDR Book: Unlocking the Pros' Hottest Post-Processing Techniques + Creating HDR Photos: The Complete Guide to High Dynamic Range Photography + Complete Guide to High Dynamic Range Digital Photography (A Lark Photography Book)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Peachpit Press; 1 edition (June 11, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321776895
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321776891
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 8.1 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #583,474 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Rafael “RC” Concepcion is an education and curriculum developer for the National Association of Photoshop Professionals, and the co-host of the D-Town TV videocast for DSLR shooters. An Adobe Certified Instructor in Photoshop, Illustrator, and Lightroom, RC has more than 14 years in the IT and e-commerce industries, and spends his days developing content for all applications in the Adobe Creative Suite at Kelby Media Group. RC also writes columns for Photoshop User magazine and recently became a best-selling author with his debut book, Get Your Photography on the Web.

More About the Author

Rafael Concepcion (RC) is an education and curriculum developer for the National Association of Photoshop Professionals, the co-host of DtownTV - The Show for all things DSLR, co-host of Photoshop User TV, and one of Scott Kelby's Photoshop Guys. An Adobe Certified Instructor in Photoshop, Illustrator, and Lightroom, RC has over 10 years in the I.T. and e-commerce industries and spends his days developing content for all applications in the Adobe Creative Suite. RC is a Photoshop World Dream Team Instructor, and has spoken at conferences and workshops as The Digital Landscape Workshop Series (www.digitallandscape.org), Voices That Matter Conference - San Francisco, CA, You Can Do it Too with Moose Peterson, and Photoshop World. RC has as delivered technical presentations for New Horizons Learning, and Intershop Communications GmbH. He is the author of "Get Your Photography on the Web" and the upcoming book "Exposing HDR" from Peachpit Press. He is also a regular columnist for Photoshop User Magazine, and Layers Magazine.

For more information on RC, please visit http://www.kelbymediagroup.com or visit his personal site at http://www.aboutrc.com

You can even connect with RC on Twitter by visiting http://www.twitter.com/aboutrc

Customer Reviews

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I really learned a lot reading this book.
Blackjack
RC does a great job teaching you about what HDR is all about.
W. Aona
I really, REALLY like RC's approach to this book.
K. Rank

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Tenna Merchent on June 14, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When it comes to reviewing photography/Photoshop books, it really depends on where you are in your development.

This book was spot on for me in my HDR development.

Stong points:
He takes you through HDR step by step. First he tells you how to capture the image, how many shots you need, a tripod, cable release, set bracket to under-even-over, mirror up, and why you should experiment with JPG. Oh my goodness, nobody who is any good admits to shooting, much less using JPG! But apparently the software companies are saying that HDR may do better with JPGs than with Raw. I'm definitely going to try it.

Then he gives numerous examples of things that lend themselves to HDR. Some of it is obvious, anything with really high contrast, and anything you want to have really high contrast. Some things, like the inside of a church, however, are not so obvious.

He uses the top three software tone-maping programs, Photoshop CS5's HDR Pro, Photomatix Pro, and HDR Efex Pro from Nik. In the process, he highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each program in that particular case. He admits to preferring HDR Efex Pro, but he uses all three programs depending on the image.

He has a large section on essential Photoshop techniques, adjustment layers, adjusting brush size, layer masks, New Smart Object Via Copy, (right clicking on the layer in the layer stack). All stuff that I use all the time.

He does a good job of describing his post HDR workflow in Photoshop. If you are a regular consumer of Photoshop User TV (a podcast) it will all look familiar, the famous merge up command, duplicating a layer then using a layer blend mode to darken and create a vignette, things that may seem sophisticated, but are easy to do.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By DanielJGregory on July 7, 2011
Format: Paperback
I just finished reading and working with RC Concepcion's newest book titled The HDR Book, and I would highly recommend this book to someone getting started with HDR or if you are finding that you just can't get what you want out of your HDR images. While I know there are a lot of opinions about HDR, I have always been a fan of HDR processing. The reason is pretty simple. I still shoot film for a large format camera, and HDR gives me access to something that I could easily do with film that was very difficult for me to do before with my digital imagery.

In the zone system, Ansel Adams said that there were ten zones that photographers work with. Those ten zones referred to creating the print. Sometimes an scene will have more than ten zones of light, and film can actually capture those zones. But to get those scenes captured, you have to expose and develop the image such that the range of light captured by the film can be translated onto the print. This process is called compensating development. The result of this process is a negative that is pretty flat with very little contrast, but lots and lots of detail (sounds like a basic tone mapped file). You then do some work in the darkroom (like with Photoshop on a HDR file) and all the sudden you have a print with detail in bright windows and dark corners of a room at the same time. Because of this, the HDR process has always been pretty exciting to me.

I learned about this particular book when I attended a workshop with RC prior to the release of this book. He did several hours of training on HDR, and I learned better ways to work with my HDR files. So once the book was announced, I quickly placed an order. As you would expect from RC, the book is very clear, concise and easy to follow.
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90 of 104 people found the following review helpful By Conrad J. Obregon TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 9, 2011
Format: Paperback
To understand what is wrong with "The HDR Book" it might help to understand how high dynamic range (HDR) photography works. The human eye discriminates a range of tones about twice that of a digital camera. That means that the human eye can see details in shady or sunny spots in a scene where a standard digital photo would just show black or white. The HDR process combines photographs taken at different exposures so that the light areas are selected from the darkest photos and the dark areas are taken from the lightest photos. The tonalities are then remapped. The blackest tone in the scene still appears as black, but some tonalities that might have appeared as black in a standard photo show as dark grey tonalities, just as a standard photograph's white tones would also show detail. An HDR photo can show the same amount of detail in dark and bright areas as the human eye sees.

All of this occurs by shifting tonalities in the photograph, either changing all of the tonalities of a certain level, or by changing tonalities based on the ratio of tonalities of adjacent pixels. In order to achieve that, HDR software offers a variety of tools, each represented by a slider, that offer different methods of shifting. As a result of the options offered, the photographer can not only extend the range of light but also change tonalities to achieve what may be considered surrealistic effects, although surrealism is not necessarily inherent in HDR processing.

In "The HDR Book" the author begins by introducing the techniques of capturing images for HDR processing, like bracketing and using a tripod. Next he discusses what subjects are particularly suited to HDR photography, although his emphasis seems to be on subjects that will lend themselves to the surrealistic approach.
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