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The Spy Who Haunted Me (Secret Histories, Book 3) Hardcover – Bargain Price, June 2, 2009


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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Green's bright, fast-paced third Eddie œShaman Bond Drood adventure (after 2008's Daemons Are Forever) opens with rumors of a traitor undermining the Drood family's efforts to guard humanity against paranormal and mystical threats. Complicating matters, legendary agent Arthur King is dying without an heir. Eddie joins a group of other agents in tackling King's challenge: solve five of mankind's greatest mysteries and learn King's secrets, including the traitor's name. Engaging, well-crafted quests take the team from Loch Ness to Roswell, where Eddie is forced to choose between saving humanity and recovering the information his family desperately needs. Though some supporting characters are clearly meant to be disposable, Eddie makes a likable hero, and fans will enjoy following him through this surprisingly complex mystery. (June)
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From Booklist

Eddie Drood is back, in a contest with five up-and-comers in the spy game. Legendary independent agent Alexander King, on his deathbed, has devised a contest, the winner of which will get his secrets, lest they expire with him. The Drood family is roped into competing by hints that King knows who the traitor in its bosom is; the other five contestants, by promises of fame, glory, and whatever else they desire. Eddie and his fellow contestants range round the world to solve some of the greatest mysteries ever, from the truth about Nessie to that about Roswell, yet only one will win. King assumes they will backstab each other, and he’s not entirely wrong. The Droods need to know who their traitor is, so Eddie will do everything necessary to win. There’s more to the contest than simple mysteries, however, and Eddie gets to the bottom of things with style and a particularly cynical sense of humor. Series-spinner Green’s Drood books are fun, funny, and action-packed, and Eddie is one of his most entertaining creations. --Regina Schroeder
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Roc Hardcover; 1 edition (June 2, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451462726
  • ASIN: B002ZNJWIQ
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 1.3 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,612,578 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Simon Green is the author of the bestselling DEATHSTALKER cycle, the New York Times bestseller ROBIN HOOD: PRINCE OF THIEVES, and many other novels. He lives in Bradford-upon-Avon in Wiltshire.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Shala Kerrigan TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 2, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I really like Simon R. Green's books and have since Blue Moon Rising. They are just a whole lot of fun with great bigger than life villains and heroes. Nothing by halves.
In this one, Edwin Drood gets invited to take part in a competition against 5 other spies held by a master spy who is offering his lifetime of secrets for the prize. While Molly isn't in it much, that's made up for by Walker from Nightside. John Taylor's nemesis and occasional ally Walker. He's a major character in this book with a lot more development. I was just absolutely tickled and thrilled about that.
Like all of Green's book, the evil is eviler and the powers are weird and the descriptions are just great. This one though is a bit more serious than most of his others but still packaged in gadgets and magic and lots of adventure that makes it all very fun reading.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 2, 2009
Format: Hardcover
"My name is Drood; Eddie Drood. Also known as Shaman Bond, the very secret agent. I face down the monsters, so you don't have to."

The first two books of the Secret Histories series was all about the nasty secrets and political upheavals of the Drood family -- and now at last, it's time for the dark-fantasy-James-Bond stuff. The third book "The Spy Who Haunted Me" is where the series really starts to take flight, with a murder mystery wrapped up in a lurid string of supernatural conspiracies -- from elves to aliens, from ancient monsters to angry ghosts.

After Eddie thwarts a bizarre caper in the Tower of London, he's called home to hear of a new problem facing the Droods -- there's a traitor among them, who is responsible for some of the nasty stuff they've dealt with.

Unfortunately the only person who knows the traitor's identity is the legendary Independent Agent, Alexander King -- and since King is dying, he's holding a special contest to discover which secret agent is worthy of inheriting his secrets and vast knowledge. Eddie is one of the chosen six -- along with the treacherous Blue Fairy, a pair of real-life Bond girls (one CIA, one a lethal seductress), King's fussy corporate grandson, and the mysterious Walker of the Nightside.

The unlikely team is given five tasks to complete, all of them tracking powerful, horrible creatures across the universe -- Loch Ness, the elven world, Tunguska and so on. But then people start turning up with broken necks, and it becomes clear that someone is murdering agents so they can get the prize. And it turns out the Independent Agent has some nasty little tricks up his sleeve for anyone who tries to get his knowledge...
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Fitzgerald on July 12, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Simon R. Green is on fire this year. Following on the heels of the excellent Just Another Judgement Day, Green delivers another fine novel with his latest entry in the Secret Histories series. The Spy Who Haunted Me is now my pick as the best book in the Shaman Bond chronicles.

It was a much needed and welcomed bounce back after last year when I really felt both Daemons Are Forever and The Unnatural Inquirer were subpar Green novels. But this year he has reinvigorated both the Nightside and Secret Histories with more investment for the heroes. Both novels last year had the usual Green mixture of fresh ideas and tons of imaginative fantasy elements, but it always felt like both Eddie Drood and John Taylor were going through the motions. This year their adventures have been more personal and both characters seem more entrenched in the action than before.

I mention the Nightside so much because, for the first time, the Drood Universe crosses over with the Nightside. It has been hard to deny that they were similar stories, John and Eddie have a lot in common and much of the action takes place in a world that (up to now) could have been the same, and now is obviously shown to be the same world. Daemons Are Forever had a crossover with Deathstalker, so it seemed inevitable for there to be a Nightside crossover as well. It is done very well, and the crossover character is one you always want more of in the Nightside books!

Another thing that I thought made this book an improvement over the last, is it felt more like the original premise of the series: that of a Fantasy James Bond. I loved The Man With The Golden Torque because it had a lot of nods to Bond and though it eventually took on a decidedly more Simon Green style, it maintained that mimicry to an extent throughout.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By rgr on August 21, 2009
Format: Hardcover
First, I need to say that I absolutely love Simon R. Green's writing. It is bright, imaginative and entertaining. Very few authors can come up with fully rounded characters that riff on common awareness - he's right up there with Gaiman and Pratchett.

Second, I wanted to love this book. The concept is reasonable and should fit in with the Drood side of the Green universe.

But either Green has gotten lazy or tired of putting much effort into his writing. A completely made up example: Eddie Drood (and companions) are in a horrible situation, in dire need of escape or defense. In this book the answer is inevitably "I'm a Drood, and I'll armor up - which will not only show me where I need to go, through the armor's special Sight (you know it's important - it's capitalized after all), but will also give me the strength, firepower, and invulnerability I need to get there."

Another completely made up example: Eddie Drood's companions are stumped about some puzzle or piece of information they need to know to advance their quest. Again, the answer is almost always "I'm a Drood, and we know everything of any consequence."

Needless to say, this gets very tiresome very shortly. The inevitability of the successful completion of each stage of the quest (I hope I didn't ruin the story for anybody that may have thought that Green would actually have Eddie Drood fail at something) eliminates any suspense. Sure theres a twist or two, but nothing that changes anything by the end.

Eddie is an infallible character and basically sleepwalks through the entire book - the only reason he is even uncomfortable in some of the locales is because he decides not to wear the Drood armor when any sane person would.

The shame is that I'll read the next in the series in the hope that Green has woken up and gets back to his normally peppy writing style.
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