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The Hawk and the Dove Trilogy (3-in-1 Volume) Paperback – January 21, 2000


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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Set in a medieval monastery and following the lives of Father Peregrine and his aide, Brother Tom, this three-in-one package reprints the original trilogy made up of The Hawk and the Dove, The Wounds of God, and The Long Fall, originally published between 1991 and 1993. As the two men grow together in their understanding of Christ, they must each learn to accept their own failings and gain strength from that acceptance. A popular series, this makes a good purchase for libraries without the series or for libraries needing to complete it.
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

“Poignant, moving, rich with imagery and emotion… Modern readers will easily identify with each character in Wilcock’s timeless human dramas of people learning to love and serve one another while growing in their understanding of a tender and compassionate God. Highly recommended reading.”
Midwest Book Review

“This is a wonderfully insightful volume, with a rich historical storyline. There’s more substantial content here than in much Christian fiction—about grace, about leadership and loyalty, about humility, about disability and suffering.”
FaithfulReader.com

“Set in a medieval monastery, this three-in-one package reprints the original trilogy made up of The Hawk and the Dove, The Wounds of God, and The Long Fall. As the characters grow together in their understanding of Christ, they must learn to accept their own failings and gain strength from that acceptance. A popular series, this makes a good purchase.” 

Library Journal

“I fell in love with Penelope Wilcock’s Hawk and the Dove series when it came out more than twenty years ago. These books are still among my favorites and, incredibly, the series keeps getting better and better. What a delight a first time reader of the series has ahead of them!”
Donna Fletcher Crow, author, Glastonbury: The Novel of Christian England and The Monastery Murders

“This masterful look into a bygone era reminds us that Christians of every age have faced the same basic struggles: how to worship God in spirit and truth, and to love our neighbors as ourselves. The inhabitants of St. Alcuin’s Abbey reveal a piety that is foreign to many believers today—and is in sore need of recovery. Many thanks to Penelope Wilcock for showing us, through the power of literature, an old way to new life.”
Bryan M. Litfin, Professor of Theology, Moody Bible Institute; author, The Sword, The Gift, and Getting to Know the Church Fathers

“Penelope Wilcock has created a wonderful cast of characters to fill the marvelously accurate fourteenth-century monastery in her medieval series. For the lover of medieval mysteries this is a series not to be missed.”
Mel Starr, author, The Unquiet Bones, A Corpse at St. Andrew’s Chapel, and A Trail of Ink 

“Now and again, the right book comes along at the exact right moment, and the timing makes the difference between a good read and a beloved read. The Hawk and the Dove Trilogy is one of those books for me. The themes that linger are God’s grace shining brightest through (not despite) weakness, as well as the refrain, ‘God forgives you, and so do I.’ It is a rare piece of fiction that moves me to worship as this did… It also gave me hope for my own weaknesses and limitations and the way they impact my community. Ms. Wilcock does a masterful job of characterization. I found this trilogy inspiring, perhaps the most devotional, grace-filled Christian fiction I’ve read since Francine Rivers’ The Mark of the Lion trilogy.”
Christina Moore, Texas

“I have read and reread Penelope Wilcock’s trilogy and given it to friends and family to read. Her character development displays a deep understanding of the human condition. Her writing also beautifully captures the complexities of the soul and illuminates the process of real transformation in the context of divine love. I have been moved to tears by this book as often as I have found myself laughing out loud! This is a story about transformation through relationships… A reader cannot help but finish the novel deeply impacted and richly blessed.”
E. Esmiol, California

“This book is beautiful in every respect. The stories are truly new, nothing that is cliché or commonplace. The writing is crystalline and beautiful but also simple… I hold this series up with The Wise Woman by George MacDonald and Perelandra by C.S. Lewis for the lessons it taught me and for the beauty it showed me. It is a truly redemptive story.”
P.J. Wong, New Mexico

The Hawk and the Dove is timeless in its portrayal of the many nuances of human nature. While portraying the disciplines and austerity of the pre-Reformation monastery, this series is yet warm and beautiful, lighted with an unforgettable ambience. With all their faults and frailties, the love of these humble brothers for their Lord and for each other makes a haunting and long-to-be-remembered story. Wilcock highlights the need to understand and embrace those who find themselves marginalized and relegated to loneliness in our church community—the deaf, the mentally handicapped, and the incontinent, to name a few. I highly recommend this book to all who wish to be both entertained and challenged.”
Rosemary C. Freeman, Kansas

“I found this book to be quite engaging and beautifully written. It was a joy to read and I found that it is worth reading again.”
Sandra Nelson, California

“We have used Wilcock’s books as devotionals at our staff meetings over the years and they have been an amazing tool in discipleship, particularly with people that struggle with self-loathing. But they also are great tools for plain, old-fashioned evangelism, for people who are nowhere near the inquiry road to truth. This trilogy has opened many doors.”
Elvira McIntosh, leader, Cornerstone Community, Dubbo, Australia

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Crossway Books (January 21, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1581341385
  • ISBN-13: 978-1581341386
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (87 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #174,979 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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More About the Author

My aim in writing is to make goodness attractive. I love simple human kindness and gentleness, and I am moved by human vulnerability. I am fascinated by the power that is within our grasp to lift one another up, to heal and strengthen and encourage each other - our power to bless.
In the novels I write, I think of the reader sitting down to enjoy a book, the door of their imagination open wide to allow the story in to influence and shape their spirit. I accept the responsibility that confers as a great privilege, and it is my intention that when you put down any book of mine at the end of reading it, you will feel hopeful, peaceful and comforted, more ready to look on your fellow human beings with compassion and see their point of view.
I live in the English town on Hastings, on East Sussex's south coast. I write a blog called Kindred of the Quiet Way.
I would like to encourage you who are reading this to take the trouble to review on Amazon the books you read - as a reader I find customer reviews immensely helpful in making up my mind whether to purchase a book, and as a writer I find readers' reviews so valuable as feedback and food for thought.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Karen Potts on July 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
Penelope Wilcock uses an old English monastery as the setting for her book, "The Hawk and the Dove". Within the monastery are unforgettable characters whom she paints with a loving and compassionate hand, showing both their sins and their unbelievable acts of love and sacrifice for God and their fellow man. The main character is Father Peregrine for whom the book is named. Throughout his life as a monk, he develops from the shallow son of an overprivileged upbringing to a man of tremendous faith and compassion, and finally to a shell of a man wracked with physical problems and the aftereffects of an undeserved beating. His interaction with his brothers gives us an example of Christlike love and behavior and likewise his sufferings show us the physical tortures which Jesus endured. This is a moving and inspiring book.
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Rosemary C. Freeman on August 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
The Hawk and the Dove: a Trilogy, with its beginning setting in a monastery in 1303, is timeless in its portrayal of the many nuances of human nature. Abbot Father Peregrine, continually humbled by his embarrassing physical handicaps, daily seeks to be a partaker of the sufferings of the Christ to whom he is deeply devoted. While portraying the disciplines and austerity of the pre-Reformation monastery, this book is yet warm and beautiful, lighted with an unforgettable ambience. With all their faults and frailties, the love of these humble brothers for their Lord and for each other makes a haunting and long-to-be-remembered story.
Penelope Wilcock seeks to highlight in this story the need to understand and embrace those who find themselves marginalized and relegated to loneliness in our church community -- a community that "organizes itself around meetings" -- the deaf, the mentally handicapped, and the incontinent, to name a few. I highly recommend this book to all who wish to be both entertained and challenged.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Shannon (sosfour9@hotmail.com) on May 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
Refreshing because it takes a course that far too many Christian fiction writers never dare to take - Ms. Wilcock portrays a love story, but between God and man, between brothers through Christ rather than the usual man and woman love story...which helps a lonely person more than dreaming about being in love does. There is no let down because the love she speaks of in this book is there for ME. Deep and soul-searching because you end up feeling what the characters feel - fear, shame, emabarrasment, release, pure love, laughter, anger, etc. You end up seeing yourself mirrored in their struggles...her words give HOPE. In the love of Christ, which is not pretty and clean, but a filthy and bloodied man - Jesus - God the Son - who poured out his blood and gave up His spirit on the cross to God the Father because of His love for me.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 22, 2001
Format: Paperback
"The Hawk and the Dove" is one of the best inspirational books that I have ever read. Ms. Wilcock did an outstanding job of characterization. I was touched by the infirmities of the monks and the depth of emotion that each portrayed. Father Peregrine, as abbot of the monastery, exemplified the true meaning of humility, grace and love. I would highly recommend this novel to anyone seeking to understand the grace of God.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
Read as parables, these stories strike at the crux of Christianity--love and faith. Wilcock presents suffering in a way that is redemptive but never shallow, and her portrayals of characters who must live with the results of their own sins and the cruelty of others should touch readers struggling with their own pasts and sorrows.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By H. Hess on January 2, 2005
Format: Paperback
Penelope Wilcox did a wonderful job of showing us how to love unconditionally. It's easy to say we love people but to read the book and the real examaples puts into perspective what true love is supposed to look like. This books is a fast and easy read, not preachy (as I was afraid it might be) and just a pure joy to read. This is one book that I will not give away but rather lend to friends and family so that I may have it to read again. Be prepared to become so engrossed in the story that you feel like you are in the monestary and be prepared to cry.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By PJ Wong on December 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book is beautiful in every respect. The stories are truly new -- by that I mean that there is absolutely nothing that is cliched or commonplace. The writing is crystalline and beautiful but also simple. But these are lesser things compared to the wonderful themes in this story.

* There is the theme of humility. Through the conflicts between the characters, we learn that repentance, forgiveness, and reconciliation are excruciating and gut-wrenching processes, but also the most God-like deeds possible to mankind.

* We see that faith without sight is very difficult but that God is always, always faithful.

* We see love that sacrifices for the good of others. The characters have to learn to show God's love to each other even when the other is repulsive and unresponsive.

I treasure this book up with "The Wise Woman" by George MacDonald and "Perelandra" by C.S. Lewis for the lessons it taught me and the beauty it showed me. It is a truly redemptive story.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on April 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
Penelope Wilcock's The Hawk And The Dove is a trilogy of novels under one cover. Poignant, moving, rich with imagery and emotion, each of these engaging stories drawn from the brothers of St. Alcuin are presented as being told to a 15-year-old girl by her mother. Tom must decide between the beautiful girl he loves and the call of God upon his life. Francis finds that never again will he need to hide his personal paint beneath a jest. When James cannot escape the truth of who he is, he pours out his grief to God and rises a newborn child of grace. Although these stories are set in an earlier century, modern readers will easily identify with each charter in Wilcock's timeless human dramas of people learning to love and serve one another while growing in their understanding of a tender and compassionate God. Highly recommended reading.
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