Buy used:
$13.90
FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by arrow-media
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Complete with case and artwork.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $0.75
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter


Available from these sellers.
9 new from $22.50 13 used from $6.99
Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD 1-Disc Version
$22.50 $6.99

Deal of the Day: 66% off "The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings Ultimate Media Collection"
Today only, save 66% on "The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings Ultimate Media Collection," featuring the "Shadow of Mordor" video game on PS4 or Xbox One, the "Lord of the Rings Motion Picture Trilogy Extended Editions" on Blu-ray, and the "J.R.R. Tolkien Hobbit and Lord of the Rings Paperback Box Set." The offer to own these media collection bundles ends November 25, 2014, 11:59 pm PST and while supplies last. Shop now

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Product Details

  • Actors: Alan Arkin, Sondra Locke, Laurinda Barrett, Stacy Keach, Chuck McCann
  • Directors: Robert Ellis Miller
  • Writers: Thomas C. Ryan, Carson McCullers
  • Producers: Joel Freeman, Marc Merson, Thomas C. Ryan
  • Format: Subtitled, NTSC, Closed-captioned
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 1.0)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: January 8, 2008
  • Run Time: 123 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (63 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005JO5S
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #228,375 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Theatrical trailer

Editorial Reviews

When hearing-impaired John Singer moves to a Southern town to continue his friendship with a recently institutionalized fellow deaf mute, his compassion changes the lives of a small circle of struggling people--who discover The Heart is a Lonely Hunter.

Customer Reviews

Alan Arkin and Sandra Locke performed their roles with great skill.
Ceinwen M Keister
This is, as promoted, simply a nice story about a really good guy: a deaf mute who helps some people and, in the end, desperately needed someone to help him.
Craig Connell
Despite his handicap, he is one of the most helpful and caring persons in this southern town he tries to call home.
K. Williams

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

76 of 78 people found the following review helpful By Miles D. Moore TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 23, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
Robert Ellis Miller's film version of "The Heart is a Lonely Hunter" is decent and straightforward, but what makes it a classic is the performance of Alan Arkin as deaf-mute John Singer. Arkin's performance moved me to tears in 1968, and subsequent viewings confirm my conviction that Arkin gives here one of the greatest performances ever recorded on film. Why has Arkin's work in "Heart" been so thoroughly forgotten? When "Premiere" magazine a few years ago did an article on actors throughout screen history playing handicapped characters, it completely ignored Arkin, although his performance was Oscar-nominated. "Heart" also contains fine early performances by stars-in-the-making Stacy Keach and Cicely Tyson, as well as a performance (also Oscar-nominated) by Sondra Locke that far exceeded anything she did afterward. But it is Arkin who dominates this film, and those who see his performance will cherish it forever.
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
No, it's not the novel, which is a multi-plotted study of four characters whose lives are symmetrically developed and eventually tied together like the themes in a sonata, all of them linked by their attraction to a deaf-mute as an alternative to a profound sense of futility, despair and, above all, loneliness felt by each of the four. The ultimate irony is that the only character who affords the others a solace from their alienation is himself the most isolated and miserable character in the story, denied even an illusory companionship when his only friend dies.

The film omits much of the confused and failed political agendas of the black Southern doctor (Dr. Copeland) and the inarticulate Marx idealogist (Jake Blount) as well as the antisocial preoccupations of the novel's unlikely, voyeuristic hero, the restaurant owner, Biff Brannon. But by focusing on the struggles of the deaf-mute (Alan Arkin) and the idealistic young woman seeking to escape from oppressive social circumstances (Sondra Locke), it accomplishes more than many films. In fact, I can think of few movies that so effectively represent life in a small-minded, provincial Southern community: a form of American pastoral that is also a microcosm of life--from racial and social prejudice to economic hardship to dreams of personal freedom and achievement to the universality of the loneliness that paradoxically joins and separates the often dysfunctional family of humanity.

This is a film with a lot of heart, one moreover that's capable of gettihg under your skin and leaving a lasting impression much like McCullers' writing. Its strengths are more likely to be apparent to someone who sees the movie before reading the novel that inspired it.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By K. Williams on March 31, 2006
Format: VHS Tape
Try as he may, stranger John Singer (Alan Arkin) just can't fit in. Responding to a vacancy ad, he becomes a single-room boarder in the home of a financially challenged family. Despite his handicap, he is one of the most helpful and caring persons in this southern town he tries to call home. If others could only read hearts as well as he reads lips, his internal vacancy could be very easily filled. Nevertheless, his loneliness -- transparent to onlookers -- grows with unspoken words until it eventually becomes unbearable.

It is hard to believe that Arkin can deliver such a dramatic role without uttering a word. This is a testimony to true versatility as you compare him in WAIT UNTIL DARK. Obviously Arkin must be accompanied by a great supportive cast. And he is with Cicely Tyson delivering a powerful performance.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Florence E. Fottrell on June 29, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
When I was very young, I saw this movie on an old projector at a school for the deaf. The lights were dim, the audience was very focused on the film because it was a rare story about deaf people and mutes. The story had many subplots and gripped our hearts and souls.... after the movie was over and the reel was clicking away, we turned up the lights.... to find that everyone had tears in their eyes, from the very young to the aged... we turned the lights back down... then slowly, after what seemed like an eternity, the lights went up and the audience began signing to each other - to their family members - to their friend..... Perhaps this also made the movie more endearing to me, but I have always believed it to be an excellent film - very poignant, and yet very often forgotten. Arkin became our hero, our lost soul, our friend.... forever and ever... When you watch this, invite friends over, or share with a friend, it is truly a memorable classic!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Brian W. Harrison on June 20, 2009
Format: VHS Tape
As so often happens, this movie does not, it seems, quite live up to the expectations of some reviewers who have first read Carson McCullers' acclaimed book of the same title. I have never read the book, but the movie, taken on its own merits, is a masterpiece that has been undeservedly neglected in the forty years since it first came out.
I saw "Lonely Hunter" back then as a young man, and it was instantly engraved on my heart and memory, especially the final graveyard scene where in just a very few words - even one letter of one word, the past tense "d" in "loved" - reveals and drives home the principal point of the movie powerfully and unforgettably. When I saw it again on DVD after forty years, the impact was just as great. I was left in reflective and tearful silence for a good half hour afterwards.
I regard this movie as a great modern tragedy, with a message worthy to rank with those of the great Greek and Shakespearian dramas.
The values are profound and deeply human. And through the artistry of Robert Ellis Miller's direction, that can only be fully appreciated on watching the film a second time when one now knows what every incident and gesture is leading up to, the viewer is invited by Alan Arkins's wordless but inspired performance to enter into the world of a handicapped but uncomplaining man whose life turns out to be one act of loving kindness after another toward the people around him. However, his inability to verbalize what is inside him inevitably means that he is pretty much just taken for granted by those same people - and indeed, by the viewer. That's part of the artistry.
This is a beautiful and timeless movie, worth watching again and again.
Rev. Brian W. Harrison
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in