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The Sun My Heart Paperback – May 11, 1988


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 142 pages
  • Publisher: Parallax Press; First Edition edition (May 11, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0938077120
  • ISBN-13: 978-0938077121
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 5.3 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #721,481 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, Vietnamese (translation)

About the Author

Date: 2003-03-03 Thich Nhat Hanh is a Vietnamese Buddhist Zen Master, poet, scholar and peace activist. During the war in Vietnam, he worked tirelessly for reconciliation between North and South Vietnam and his courageous efforts moved Martin Luther King to nominate him for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1967. During the war, he founded the Van Hanh Buddhist University in Saigon and the School of Youth for Social Service. Forced into exile because of his efforts to negotiate peace in Vietnam, he continued his activism, rescuing boat people and helping to resettle Vietnamese refugees abroad. Today he lives in Plum Village, his meditation centre in France, and travels widely, leading retreats on the art of mindful living. Thich Nhat Hahn is a Vietnamese Buddhist Zen Master, a poet, scholar and peace activist. During the Vietnam war his work for peace and reconcilliation moved Martin Luther King Jr to nominate him for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1967. He founded the Van Hanh Buddhist University in Saigon and the School of Youth for Social Service. He was exiled as a result of his work for peace but continued his activism, rescuing boat people and helping to resettle Vietnamese refugees. He has written more than 100 books, which have sold millions of copies around the world. He now lives in France where he has founded a meditation centre and travels widely, leading retreats and addressing major conferences on the subject of mindful living --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Thich Nhat Hanh is a Vietnamese monk, a renowned Zen master, a poet, and a peace activist. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize by Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1967, and is the author of many books, including the best-selling The Miracle of Mindfulness.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Moten Swing on September 10, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is a wonderful brief introduction to Buddhist thought, but what makes it stand out is the first chapter. If you meditate, and wonder if you are "doing it right," in a few pages you will have a good understanding of what meditation is about--and it's reassuring. Don't try to empty the mind, don't get discouraged at all those random thoughts. Just observe and be aware. This book is encouraging and warm and profound.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Neal J. Pollock VINE VOICE on December 23, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is far and away the best of his 4 books I've read (Thundering Silence, Creating True Peace, and Anger). As a student of Dzogchen, I see tons of parallels with the author's Zen approach. Even better, as a scientist, I greatly enjoyed his use of modern scientific views as parallels to Buddhist thought and theory. Of course, both Mindfulness and Insight Meditation are used in virtually all types of Buddhism including Theravada (Southeast Asian or Southern Buddhism) and Vajrayana (Tibetan Buddhism--a type of Northern or "Mahayana"). There are many currently available Tibetan books on these two which have far more details and more pithy descriptions IMHO. Even Dzogchen and Mahamudra books describe them and promote their continued usage. Still, this is a good book with some different information (less duplication than some of TNH's other works). It has quite a good deal of useful information in its few pages. I gave a copy as a gift to a friend. This one is worth the read.
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Format: Paperback
I was somewhat disappointed in this book, since I was expecting something along the lines of previous little books by this author on mindfulness. This book proved different, though of course the subjects of mindfulness, breathing exercises and so on do come up. I suppose one could say that the topic of this book is the same as that of the others, this book just goes deeper (infinitely deeper).

This book shows a highly intellectual, philosophical side of the author. He teaches us that mind and object are one, that "one is all, all is one". He thus discusses the interdependence of all phenomena, leading us to understand, for instance, that the fate of the underdeveloped countries cannot be separated from that of the wealthy countries. Each war involves all countries.

He refers to the Avatamsaka Sutra, which states that a speck of dust contains in itself infinite space and endless time. Time and space contain each other and are interdependent. This is backed by Einstein's theory of relativity, which he also analyzes.

He discusses form and emptiness and concludes that "reality is beyond these two concepts". He also introduces a concept called "the miraculousness of existence", to be aware that the universe is contained in each thing and could not exist otherwise. We thus cannot say that something exists, or does not exist, thus the term "miraculous existence".

He refers back and forth to various Sutras and modern science, demonstrating that the authors of the Sutras and scientists, such as Oppemheimer and Einstein, are saying the same thing. Thus, Oppenheimer indicated that electrons were beyond the concepts of being and non-being.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
With clear explanations and lucid analogies, Thich Nhat Hanh points the way to an understanding of the "historical dimension" of every day life and the "ultimate dimension" of true reality, and shows that these two are not different from each other.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An ocean of dharma even in the clouds

A wonderful book that can be enjoyed again and again - some different teaching every time
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