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The Hebrew Kid and the Apache Maiden Hardcover – November 16, 2004


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 230 pages
  • Publisher: Seraphic Press; First Edition edition (November 16, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0975438212
  • ISBN-13: 978-0975438213
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6.8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,776,845 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Avrech’s wise coming-of-age novel delivers memorable characters... suspense, dashes of humor, lessons... that bridge cultures and generations. -- Rochelle Krich, author of Grave Endings

Beautiful, funny, poignant—an exquisite novel. -- Michael Levin, author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Jewish Spirituality & Mysticism

This is can’t put-it-down reading... a compelling fable. -- The Jewish Press

About the Author

A screenwriter and producer based in Hollywood, Robert J. Avrech wrote the acclaimed thriller Body Double, directed by Brian DePalma. His script for the modern Hasidic tale A Stranger Among Us, directed by Sidney Lumet, was an official selection of the Cannes Film Festival. Robert won an Emmy Award for his adaptation of the young adult classic The Devil’s Arithmetic and was nominated for The Humanitas Award for Within These Walls, starring Ellen Burstyn and Laura Dern. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife and children.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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While Ariel is the book's most sympathetic character, momma and Doc Holliday are the most entertaining.
Luke Ford
Emmy-winning screenwriter Robert J. Avrech presents The Hebrew Kid and the Apache Maiden, an unforgettable historical fiction novel set in the wild west.
Midwest Book Review
There were many times in the book that I was pleasantly surprised by the twists and turns in the story.
Bookwormzer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By HeyJudy VINE VOICE on January 1, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'll admit, I bought THE HEBREW KID AND THE APACHE MAIDEN for my 12 year-old nephew, but I couldn't resist taking a peek myself. And, once I started it, I was hooked; couldn't put it down.

Author Robert Avrech has crafted a marvelous plot. He weaves together the history of the Jews with details about traditional anti-Semitism--both in Europe and in the United States--along with lore about the American Wild West of the 19th Century.

This novel is a work which combines great imagination with scholarly research.

Every page here is an adventure, starting with Apaches on the war path and moving on to Mexican desperadoes. The reader, especially the younger reader, definitely will learn much about the Jewish religion as a result of reading this book.

According to the author's biography, he already is a successful screenwriter. I have read novels written by great authors, and I have seen screenplays written by great screenwriters, and THE HEBREW KID AND THE APACHE MAIDEN is the equal of the best of them.

Robert Avrech dedicated this book to the memory of his son.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Luke Ford on November 9, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I read this novel by my friend Robert J. Avrech straight through in two hours Friday night. I laughed out loud a dozen times. It is terrific and a much-needed contribution to fiction for kids.

.........

A soldier approaches the frum family.

"You get back to your Cossack friends before I knock your head in, you dirty little sheygitz." Mama lifted a cast iron skillet.

"Please, ma'am, I'm not a sheygitz. My name is Schulman. I'm a landsman. A Jew."

...............

The mother yells at this Indian maiden Lozen. "So you be careful who you call a witch. Let me tell you something, you might scare the goyim with your whoops and hollers and guns and knives, but to me you're just a little shicksah pisher. And a little advice, maidel: you should spend a bit more time on your looks... You think a man is going to want to marry a wild girl? You should be thinking about a shidduch, not riding around like you're on the warpath!"

Mama was practically shouting. Lozen nodded mutely.

............

The book is written from the perspective of Ariel, a 12-year old about to celebrate his bar mitzvah in the Wild West of the 1870s.

It's clearly crafted by an accomplished screenwriter. All the scenes have conflict and move the story forward. Most of the chapters end with a hook that compells you to keep reading. The story often heads in the opposite direction of what you'd expect.

Dialogue is an Avrech strength. His emails are frequently hilarious when he paints his life with spare dialogue.

While Ariel is the book's most sympathetic character, momma and Doc Holliday are the most entertaining.
Read more ›
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer A. Hedley on January 2, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I met screenwriter Robert J. Avrech and his wife for the first time before Christmas, and he presented me with a copy of his book. He hoped to learn the impact his words would have on a non-Jewish California girl. Today, I emailed him the following message, which I hope will be useful to persons considering his book as a delightful addition to their bookshelves and their lives:

I want you to know that I finally had some quiet time yesterday afternoon/evening to sit alone and enjoy your book.  That the story revolves around a Jewish family is in no way a road block to enjoying the pages.  In fact, I was incredibly grateful for the glossary at the end of the book, which I referred to again and again, and the story not only satisfied my thirst for adventure but also for cultural knowledge.

The empathy and compassion with which you drew the characters -- Jews, goyims, gamblers and warriers alike -- enabled the story to be appealing cross-culturally.  When Ariel brought this message home in the last few pages at his bat mitzvah, I was moved to tears.  Your story is really all about love, isn't it?  I feel it on every page.  I can see that this book will be appealing to audiences young and old, because it is so fun to accompany your characters on their journey, and there is also deeper meaning on every page.  Thank you for sharing this with me.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J on December 14, 2004
Format: Hardcover
With this engrossing novel for readers of all ages and faiths, Robert J. Avrech spins a suspenseful story that will have you on the edge of your seat from start to finish.

As someone who is not overly interested in the Old West, I wasn't sure how captivated I would be with the historical setting of this book. Much to my surprise, I found myself enchanted by the fictional escapades of these figures who really did exist. The center of it all is young Ariel, who Avrech manages to write as pious, modest, and extremely loveable at the same time - no mean feat.

With rich language and imagery so vivid that you really feel as if you are seeing the book unfold before your very eyes, The Hebrew Kid and the Apache Maiden is one of those novels that you and your children will read time and time again over the years. (It helps that the book itself is of such fine quality - with a sturdy sewn binding, charming chapter illustrations, and beautiful gold foil imprints, this is a real work of art and should be treasured as such.) In fact, with the way the scenes reveal themselves through Avrech's stunning prose, a film version of this tale is almost not necessary - though I eagerly await from screenwriter Avrech the cinematic rendering of one of the most touching and fortifying tales of faith and good deeds that I have ever read. With just as much anticipation, I await the day that I can share this book with my own children.
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