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The Hebrew Yeshua vs. the Greek Jesus Paperback – January 1, 2005

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Gordon places Yeshua into his Hebraic context and allows Yeshua's own words to sparkle within their original Semitic setting! -- Avi Ben Mordechai, Preface

Yeshua's brutally honest words in the Hebrew version of Matthew are nothing short of revolutionary for the believer. -- Michael Rood, Introduction

About the Author

Nehemia Gordon holds a degree in Biblical Studies and Archaeology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Fluent in Hebrew, Gordon has worked extensively with ancient manuscripts and on the publication and translation of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Today, he divides his time between lecturing on Tanach and Hebrew New Testament topics, teaching Biblical Hebrew to private individuals and small groups, and continuing his research on the Hebrew sources of the New Testament.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Hilkiah Press; 3 edition (January 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 097626370X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0976263708
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (120 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #241,579 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Nehemia Gordon holds a Masters Degree in Biblical Studies and a Bachelors Degree in Archaeology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Nehemia has worked as a translator on the Dead Sea Scrolls and as a researcher deciphering ancient Hebrew manuscripts. He has been invited to speak in synagogues and churches around the world and has led groups of pilgrims and visitors on tours of biblical sites. A native of Chicago, Nehemia has made his home in Jerusalem, Israel since 1993.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

81 of 84 people found the following review helpful By Steve Eastman on December 27, 2010
Format: Paperback
The story of how The Hebrew Yeshua vs. the Greek Jesus came to be is almost as interesting as the subjects covered in the book. A group of men in black coats and hats with long, curly sideburns were gathered to discuss the ancient Biblical Hebrew Calendar. The keynote speaker walked to the table where Messianic Jew Michael Rood was seated, gave him a scrap of paper and said, "You need to contact this person as soon as possible." The next day Rood was face to face with Nehemia Gordon, one of the translators of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Gordon is not Messianic, but is still considered a rebel by many Jews. Christians would see him as a Jewish equivalent of the Bereans. He interprets his faith by the Word of God as given in the Old Testament. Jews, who are aware of the term, would call him a Karaite. When the Temple in Jerusalem was destroyed in 70 AD, the Pharisees filled the gap left by the end of the priestly system. They added many traditions not found in the Old Testament. Karaites, such as Gordon, reject these traditions. Many Jews today are spiritual descendants of the Pharisees.

Gordon started studying the Gospel of Matthew in Hebrew, to answer a question from his Messianic friend. It turns out some of the early church fathers said Matthew was originally written in Hebrew. From there it was translated, with some difficulty, into Greek and other languages. English translations, which came much later, show more signs of "Greek-isms" (patterns of expression characteristic of the Greek language) than "Hebrew-isms." Gordon came across a copy of Matthew from the times of the Inquisition. A Jewish scholar had added it as an appendix to a document he prepared to answer his Catholic interrogators.
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59 of 64 people found the following review helpful By Trish on March 12, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
How many people know there is a Hebrew version of Matthew and how it differs
from the Greek version? Well, everyone who loves Scriptural truths will love
this book. You will learn a lot about Orthodox and Rabbinical Judaism, not
to mention learning at a deeper level what Yahusha was up against when
confronting the nonbelieving Pharisess. In the DVD one can learn a great
deal also, and Gordon is an excellent speaker, able to rivit the attention
without any high tech visuals. I think it must take a significant amount
of courage to speak out against traditions that Gordon was raised in and
I applaud him for that and for the fact that he has brought a great treasure
to our attention. Like many truly great treasures, it will probably be
considered a trinket, or worse, to so many in the world.
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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Netzari on March 5, 2010
Format: Paperback
Was Yahshua clashing with the Pharisees over Torah obedience? No way. He commanded us to obey Torah. Nehemiah Gordon does a fantastic job demonstrating the real dispute between Messiah and the Religious leadrs of His day. It was not about Torah, but about their "Takanot and Ma'asim" man-made religious traditions that kept people in bondage. This is written in the pages of the REnewed Covenant scriptures, but church doctrine has blinded us to this truth. You will read the B'rit Chadasha (New Testament) with fresh eyes after you read this.

The Video is even better.
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Piero on June 27, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is essential for all those who seek the authentic.

Nehemiah's exposition of Matthew 23:3 is excellent, and resolves a dilemma which must puzzle almost every believer who seriously considers the implications of this verse, and its contradiction with what Yeshua says in the rest of Chapter 23.

Through a number of examples he also shows the danger of straying from the written Torah, by either adding to it or taking away from it. That is what the oral law does, which is what defines Pharasaic rabbinism (as distinct from Karaism). Nehemiah shows concrete examples of its anti-Messianic implications, like those which frequently led to disagreements between the Pharisees and Yeshua. He also shows how the traditions of the rabbinists are so deeply embedded, that if Messiah was to appear today and disagree with them on some point, they believe they would have the authority to override Him. Extraordinary!

I found the book easy and enjoyable to read, and it provided many fresh and valuable insights. To those who believe in Yeshua, do not be put off by the fact that it is written by a Karaite Jew. As Nehemiah rightly points out, Yeshua Himself looks very much like a Karaite Jew, One who came to overturn the traditions and reaffirm the written Torah of Moses. Of course He did much more than this, by being the more perfect Sacrifice and the conduit for the Ruach HaKodesh, but that is a whole separate story.

Happy reading, and shalom!
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36 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Edward J. Vasicek on April 17, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book's title is a little misleading; it does not really contrast the Jewish version of Jesus with a Greek version, but rather it focuses on the meaning of the phrase, "the seat of Moses" and whether Jesus taught his disciples to follow the rabbinic rulings of his day (or oral tradition).

The author (Nehemia Gordon) appeals to a late (14th century) Hebrew version of Matthew (preserved by Shem Tov in the 14th century). Nehemia Gordon maintains this version might reflect the original version of Matthew. According to the very early church father, Papias, Matthew was originally written in Hebrew. As a Karaite Jew, the author rejects rabbinic Judaism but embraces the Biblical Judaism described in the Old Testament. His view is that Jesus also rejected rabbinic Judaism and the oral law.

In the Hebrew version of Shem Tov, Jesus tells his disciples to obey MOSES, but not those who sit in the seat of Moses. The Greek version of the text says to obey THEM (i.e., the authoritative Pharisees).

Even if ShemTov's Matthew is NOT related to the original Matthew which Papias referred to, even back translation from Greek into Hebrew could clarify matters, like the seat of Moses. This back-translation is an area where evangelical scholarship needs to develop. If Jesus spoke Mishnaic Hebrew (and there is a movement in this direction, as opposed to the established view that he spoke Aramaic), then it could be helpful to recreate the words he spoke in the language in which he spoke them. But that is my soapbox, not the author's.

The book is a quick, interesting read. If you are interested in Jewish roots, you will find the book worth thinking about. Although Gordon is not a Christian, there is nothing hostile or offensive in the book toward those of us who follow Jesus.
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