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The Heidegger Controversy: A Critical Reader Paperback – December 3, 1992


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 327 pages
  • Publisher: The MIT Press; 1st MIT Press Ed edition (December 3, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262731010
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262731010
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #893,019 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Victor Farias ( Heidegger and Nazism , LJ 12/89) started it; Jean-Francois Lyotard ( Heidegger and the "Jews , " LJ 7/90) and Gunther Neske ( Heidegger and National Socialism: Questions and Answers , LJ 11/15/90), among others, continued it; and now this book keeps the dialectic of "L'affaire Heidegger" alive and well. It is divided into three parts: Heidegger's own writings pertinent to his association with and attitudes toward Nazism (several of which, being basic, appear also in the aforementioned books); writings by his contemporaries; and, finally, essays by recent European critics. Editor Wolin, a professor at Rice University, provides an exceptionally perceptive introduction and a final essay entitled "The Heidegger Debate in France."-- Leon H. Brody, U.S. Office of Personnel Management Lib., Washington, D.C.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"This should become the standard sourcebook for those troubled by the links between arguably the greatest philosopher of our century and unarguably its most infamous political movement." Martin Jay, University of California, Berkeley

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a fine documentation of the Heidegger controversy, containing a fair and broad selection of views. Two points in the previous review I found infuriating. Firstly, Marcuse, although strongly influenced by Marx, was not a Communist, or at least in any form that the Communist parties of his time could accept or understand. He took very independent stands on many issues, and managed to infuriate both the hard left and the hard right at various times of his life. In fact, I found Marcuse's response to Heidegger's fairy tale--the beginning of the Nazi period looked wonderful, but then the Nazi leaders proved stubborn, close-minded, etc., especially because they refused to heed Martin H.--one of the most moving and devasting replies of all: the beginning was already
the end, at least of all humanist and humane values in Germany.
Secondly, nobody has an exact body count yet for the Soviet Union, but no serious historian has contested that the rate of the Nazi killing--at least 20 million killed in six years of war, about 5 million Jews within about two years at the end of the war, plans for further ethnic cleansing throughout Europe and Asia should they have won the war, and so on--far outmatched that of the Soviet Union, even at its worst. The deaths caused by lousy planning, famine, destruction of the environment, irradiating their citizens, and so on, are more difficult to tally, but this is not the same as systematically killing non-combatants on a scale perhaps never before seen in history. I beg the reviewer not to trivialize this issue.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By reader on August 30, 2004
Format: Paperback
Just wanted to provide a little background for this book. The animus between Wolin and Derrida, which the first reviewer perceived, is real. Wolin reproduced (in the first edition of this book) Derrida's "the Philosophers' Hell" without permission and in a poor, often misleading translation. (Derrida cites many of these errors in "Points..." pp. 440-444. The editor of that text cites more of them on pp.486-487.) For these reasons, Derrida requested that it be excluded from subsequent printings. There is also an exchange consisting of several letters and articles from the various parties printed in The New York Review of Books in the Spring of 1993.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By RLR on December 7, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Richard Wollin has written and edited one of the most useful and important collection of essays/critiques of the German philsopher Martin Heidegger and the character and extent of his commitment to National Socialism.
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