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The O. Henry Prize Stories 2013: Including stories by Donald Antrim, Andrea Barrett, Ann Beattie, Deborah Eisenberg, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, Kelly Link, Alice Munro, and Lily Tuck Kindle Edition

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Length: 512 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Another installment [of] the esteemed literary award volume, full, as ever, of exemplary short fiction....  Essential for students of contemporary fiction." --Kirkus Reviews
 
“Widely regarded as the nation’s most prestigious awards for short fiction.” —The Atlantic Monthly

About the Author

Laura Furman, series editor of The O. Henry Prize Stories since 2003, is the winner of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts for her fiction. The author of seven books, including her recent story collection The Mother Who Stayed, she taught writing for many years at the University of Texas at Austin. She lives in Central Texas.

Product Details

  • File Size: 1606 KB
  • Print Length: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Anchor (September 10, 2013)
  • Publication Date: September 10, 2013
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00BRUQ7BI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #179,391 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By cs211 on December 21, 2013
Format: Paperback
I read the O. Henry and Best American short story anthologies every year and I generally recommend them with varying degrees of enthusiasm. The minor variations in quality from year to year pale beside the primary benefit, which is to gain exposure to a plentitude of authors and writing styles in one volume. Short stories are an underappreciated art form: in the best case they deliver a compelling example of an author’s best writing in a concentrated, easily accessible format. Anthologies are also well-suited for today’s busy readers, as they can be set aside for days or weeks at a time, and picked up when the next reading opportunity presents itself.

As Laura Furman’s tenure as chief editor of the O. Henry Prize Stories grows, I have found that the tone of her volumes has changed. Early in her editorship her selected stories tended towards dark events and visions of the world, which is only a subset of the human experience. Recently, and especially with this year’s volume, I feel that her selections are broader in scope and tone, and that she is choosing stories that do more experimentation of form and storyline. This evolution is a welcome one, for this reader.

That trend is best exemplified by my favorite story in this year’s volume (which was also the favorite of one of the three prize jurists, Edith Pearlman): “The Summer People”, by Kelly Link. Link’s gem expertly combines elements of mundane working-class reality with the magical. Link manages to both convey some hard truths about power, money and class while also creating a fantasy that had this reader enthralled and wishing that it could be true.

Other stories that I enjoyed were:

--”Two Opinions”, by Joan Silber: this story could easily have degenerated into a political advocacy piece.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Linhoff on January 8, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Worth the cost of the book for the Eisenberg and Beattie stories. The other entries are also well-selected. Highly recommended.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Allen Long on May 28, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First off, this is a robust story collection that is well worth the cover price.
Second, before rendering my subjective opinion about the twenty stories in this collection, I should state that I prefer traditional character-driven short stories with a lot of heart. By heart, I mean stories that powerfully engage my emotions. Plus, the best stories engage my intellect as well.
Based on these criteria, I found the best four stories in this collection to be "Leaving Maverly" by Alice Munro; "He Knew" by Donald Antrim; "Where Do You Go?" by Samar Farah Fitzgerald; and "Sinkhole" by Jamie Quatro.
"Leaving Maverly" by short story master Alice Munro relates the love story of Ray, a policeman, and Isabel, his invalid wife. Their steadfast love is artfully punctuated by the periodic appearance of a dynamic younger woman named Leah for whom dramatic change seems to be a way of life.
"He Knew" by Donald Antrim is about Stephen and Alice, a woman and her considerably older husband who decide to indulge in a day of retail therapy that begins at Bergdorf Goodman and continues along a string of luxury stores on Madison Avenue. Both members of the couple are medicated for psychiatric issues. During this journey, they experience an exhausting run of ups and downs and steps backward and forward that do nothing to extinguish their ardent love, and the story ends in a moment of extraordinary hope fully supported by the reader.
Samar Farah Fitzgerald's story "Where Do You Go?" is a fascinating story of a young couple who unintentionally move to a small village populated by senior citizens about an hour from the big city where they hold professional publishing jobs that allow them to work from home. At first, they are both amused by and a bit wary of their situation.
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By Anita Hunter on January 14, 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
eXCELLENT GROUP OF SHORT STORIES.
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By Canary on July 29, 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Good book
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