The Hero and the Outlaw and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $32.00
  • Save: $15.29 (48%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 16 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Hero and the Outlaw: ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Payneless Inc.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Tracking number provided with every order. Slight wear on edges and covers; otherwise item is in very good condition.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Hero and the Outlaw: Building Extraordinary Brands Through the Power of Archetypes Hardcover – February 6, 2001


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$16.71
$15.87 $5.36
$16.71 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 16 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Hero and the Outlaw: Building Extraordinary Brands Through the Power of Archetypes + Archetypes in Branding: A Toolkit for Creatives and Strategists
Price for both: $47.01

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1st edition (February 6, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071364153
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071364157
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #29,552 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Pearson is the president of the Center for Archetypal Studies and Applications and the author of The Hero Within: Six Archetypes We Live By (1998) and a coauthor of Magic at Work: Camelot, Creative Leadership, and Everyday Miracles (1995). Mark is a consultant specializing in business strategy and brand management. Pearson's work is based on Jungian psychology, which holds that archetypes are forms or images of a collective nature, which occur not only as myths but also as individual products of the unconscious. Using examples from advertising and marketing and consumer, popular, and organizational culture, she and Mark show that successful brands draw on responses to such archetypes as the hero, outlaw, lover, sage, magician, creator, and innocent, and that these responses cross lifestyle and cultural boundaries. They examine ways to determine which archetypal meaning is best for one's brand and provide a model for doing so. David Rouse
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

Using examples from advertising and marketing and consumer, popular, and organizational culture, Pearson and Mark show that successful brands draw on responses to such archetypes as the hero, outlaw, lover, sage, magician, creator, and innocent, and that these responses cross lifestyle and cultural boundaries. (Booklist)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Then the brand examples are very helpful in understanding how the approach applies to branding.
James Cobb
This book draws some rock-solid suggestions about how companies can build successful brands by tapping into the fables and stories that are hardwired into our DNA.
Larry Goodman
So if you're trying to get a handle on branding and figure out what will work for you, grab this book.
Stacy Karacostas

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Cathy on March 21, 2001
Format: Hardcover
For those marketers who have always had a secret predilection for using their intuition, who've harbored a belief in the hidden power of the right 'fit' in a message - The Hero and The Outlaw reads like a long, drawn-out ahhhhhhhh. Like scratching an itch. Like constant light bulbs going off in your brain, one after another. It drives to the central question behind all the 'buzz' about branding - in what exactly, and where exactly, resides the buried power of a brand? What is its hidden deep source? How come a brand 'pushes our buttons?'
The simple, graceful and very fitting answers are given by Margaret Mark and Carol Pearson in their new book The Hero and The Outlaw - Building Extraordinary Brands Through the Power of Archetypes. When a brand taps into one of their twelve major archetypes, and does so in a way that feels right and appropriate, then the brand 'works.' Consumers respond, a channel of understanding is opened, the message is received.
The twelve archetypal categories which Pearson and Mark use for their analysis are: Creator, Caregiver, Ruler, Jester, Regular Guy/Gal, Lover, Hero, Outlaw, Magician, Innocent, Explorer, Sage. For instance: Williams-Sonoma is a 'creator' brand, and so is going to carry meaning and resonance for consumers who want to craft something new in their lives. Ivory Soap is the 'purest' example of the Innocent archetype. And if Nike is a Hero brand, you can be sure that the Harley-Davidson brand is an Outlaw archetype.
While all the right brain, intuitive marketers are delighted to consider such a workable and insightful way of thinking about branding, rest assured, their more left brain associates have not been 'left' behind.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
41 of 54 people found the following review helpful By P. Marks on September 13, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I was disappointed by the lack of rigorous thinking in this book.

Sure, different companies have different personalities and personality is part of the brand. We could even create our own set of Jungian archetypical brand personalities, and go about attaching them to different brands.

But now for a test. Is Coca Cola a Creator -- helping inspire its users to do great bubbly things? Is it a Caregiver -- showing care for others? Maybe it's a Ruler -- a tough competitor and long the top dog in Cola Wars? How about a Jester -- always at the center of a good time? Or just it's just the drink for Regular Guys and Gals? Look at the ads -- maybe its a Lover or at least a drink for Lovers sharing a soda with two straws? Or, how about an almost Heroic presence, again from ads? Sometimes, it has a sort of Outlaw feel (with folks like Mean Joe Greene playing Robin Hood handing a Coke to a kid). In the old days Coca Cola ads praised it both for giving energy and a calming effect -- though there's no archetype for either of those. So, maybe it is more a Magician -- think of some of those magical ads past and animated present and its ability to give both energy and calm the soul. Given Coca Cola's global ubiquity and appeal, it might well be the drink of Explorers. It might even be (given the caffeine) the energy drink for yuppie Sages? Well, it turns out (according to the authors), that Coke is clearly so successful because it's an "Innocent." The toughest competitor in the Cola Wars, a mixture of caffeine, water, and sugar, almost wizened from a century of success -- yeah, it's clearly an Innocent and that explains everything.

My point is that the book lacks any sense of rigor, proof, or science-like basis in fact.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Lois Bitner Olson on September 16, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book marries one of the most fundamental elements of psychology to market positioning and brand strategy. Using the Jungian archetypes, the authors simplify the development of solid brands. They are replete with wonderful illustrative examples. Since the archetypes are subconscious, it has been difficult for us as marketers to understand how they operate in brand development and giving meaning to brands. The authors offer a very simple method to analyze the brand's archetype and where it fits within the competitive product category.
Even if you are not a marketing person, you will enjoy reading the archetypes, trying to figure out what most appeals to you personally - and no surprise those are usually your favorite brands.
Well written and calls upon many ancient and modern authors who understand how people behave and why.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Rolf Dobelli HALL OF FAME on August 31, 2001
Format: Hardcover
When you think of Apple Computer, does the image of "The Rebel" come to mind? If authors Margaret Mark and Carol S. Pearson are right, these archetypes should spring to your mind as part of the identification of these brands. The authors assert that people think in a certain subliminal way about companies based on the characteristics of archetypal personalities. Your company, they say, should define the archetype that fits its culture (is your firm an "Explorer" or an "Innocent?") and consistently brand its products accordingly. While they quote people seldom seen in business books "Carl Jung, Joseph Campbell "they insist that their ideas are practical and profitable. If you are an executive who wonders what to do to make your brand stand out, we at recommend this book to you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews