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The Hidden Face of God: Science Reveals the Ultimate Truth Paperback – May 9, 2002


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The Hidden Face of God: Science Reveals the Ultimate Truth + The Science of God: The Convergence of Scientific and Biblical Wisdom + Genesis and the Big Bang: The Discovery Of Harmony Between Modern Science And The Bible
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Free Press (May 9, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743203259
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743203258
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (78 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #41,243 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Israeli physicist Schroeder extends the approach taken in previous works (Genesis and the Big Bang; The Science of God) by reviewing biological phenomena whose intricate complexity hints at "wisdom within wisdom" in the design of the universe. "If we could see within as easily as we see without, every aspect of existence would be an unfolding encounter with awe; almost a religious experience even for a secular spectator," he writes. Although Schroeder can claim no special expertise in cell biology or neuroscience, his enthusiasm and sense of wonder are personally engaging, and his metaphysical speculations reflect a wry humility that cannot be taken for granted in this genre. Schroeder writes in two moods, sometimes discerning the transcendent unity of the divine wisdom with unequivocal clarity, sometimes tracing the pattern only faintly and accentuating the continuing hiddenness of God. Although he expresses obvious impatience with orthodox Darwinism and the "materialist superstition" of hard-core reductionists like Richard Dawkins and Steven Pinker, he is gracious toward religious skeptics and often addresses them as his primary audience. While many in the scientific community have been openly distrustful of the "intelligent design" movement and suspicious of its (generally Christian) religious associations, Schroeder's professional stature and his nonliteralistic approach to the Bible may help him connect with a wider readership.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Schroeder takes the widespread perception that science disproves religion and turns it on its head: from cosmology to neurology, the latest research makes sense only if viewed from a metaphysical perspective. The strict materialism that excludes all purpose, choice, and spirituality from the world simply cannot account for the data pouring in from labs and observatories. Nor can it explain the thrill of transcendence that occasionally pierces ordinary lives. Well schooled in the rigors of the sciences, Schroeder knows too much about natural complexity to try to wring some tidy set of doctrines out of the cosmos. Rather, it is an ineffable shiver of the divine, a deep-down stirring of wonder, that he discovers in the furthest reaches of quantum physics, glossed with the poetry of the Hebrew prophets and the mysteries of the kabbalah. At the heart of the cell, in the depths of the quasar, lies a deep wisdom encoded in a unified chain of information. Let rigid atheists and biblical literalists take a pass, but this book deserves widespread circulation among readers still alive to the hidden harmonies of the universe. Bryce Christensen
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Gerald L. Schroeder is the author of Genesis and the Big Bang and The Science of God. He earned his Ph.D. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before moving to laboratories at the Weizmann Institute, the Hebrew University, and the Volcani Research Institute in Israel. His work has been reported in Time, Newsweek, Scientific American, and in leading newspapers around the world. He lives in Jerusalem with his wife and their five children.

Customer Reviews

This book is not a light read, but the information is very accessible.
D. Wafford
Before reading this book I was caught up in my own thoughts everyday thinking of the deeper meanings of everything I saw, trying to anyway.
mike brown
The author is a well renowned neuro-scientist as well as a devout believer in God.
NAVY04

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

207 of 219 people found the following review helpful By Keith on May 17, 2002
Format: Hardcover
As a physicist, I have been seduced by the awe and mystery (to borrow from "The Outer Limits") of quantum mechanics for years. Still, the esoteric nature of subatomic physics was never adequate to convince me of an intelligent design of the universe. Schroeder, however, has succeeded in convincing me of an underlying wisdom in nature through his eloquent description of the mind-boggling complexity of molecular biology. I came away from this book with a perplexing and contradictory sense of calm and breathlessness.
Schroeder succeeds where others have failed; namely, he has convinced me that an honest and compelling argument can be made for the existence of God/Creator/universal intelligence without resorting to fundamentalist dogma or pseudo-science.
Be warned: parts of the book are tedious; Schroeder admits this. If you are unwilling to put some thought behind the subject matter, then this book isn't for you. But if you're not afraid to think, then by all means read his book; your soul will thank you.
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37 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Bert Wiefels on December 4, 2003
Format: Paperback
Schroeder is a wonderful teacher. He sees the sublime in science and his prose is at times beautifully poetic. He delves in both the macrocosm as well as microcosm using both to show that there is an inherent design to the universe and the life within it. This is a book that is well suited to those who would run from the usual creationist palaver yet feel that all of the wonder we see in this universe has to be more than an accident.
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56 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Wesley L. Janssen VINE VOICE on August 26, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Noted Israeli physicist Gerald Schroeder presents a compelling case that our universe is readily reducible to simply this -- an immaterial wisdom. "The solidity of iron is actually 99.9999999999999 percent startlingly vacuous space made to feel solid by ethereal fields of force having no material reality at all." And what is that tiny portion of an "atom" of matter that we describe as supposedly being "matter", that is, the quarks and electrons? They are incredibly precise (i.e., specified) packets of 'frozen' energy, highly tuned to interact with these highly tuned "ethereal fields." It seems that such objects are essentially intellectual constructs, as are all the "objects" of the so-called particle zoo. We call "something" a quark (or a photon, electron, etc) only because we can assign a certain behavior to "it". But what is "it"? Apart from saying that "it" is specified information, nobody knows. Within the quantum mechanical framework, these "objects" are essentially mathematical objects. As Einstein told us, what we call matter is merely condensed ("frozen") energy. And it turns out that energy is merely information. But what incredibly elegant information it is! (If it were not, neither people nor stars nor any "material" thing could exist). The materialist paradigm of our age is decidedly uneasy with the revelation that "matter" is but an elegant creation of a nonmaterial and extra cosmic entity. Why should we have an "Elegant Universe"? Philosophical pre-commitments seek a "blind" non-thing as an explanation, actually demanding a clumsy series of explanations other than the theist's Creator.Read more ›
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 24, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Gerald Schroeder, with his unusual background (expertise in biology and physics, and a very broad knowledge of world religions)is one of those rare people with the qualifications to write a book such as this. And it's a good thing, too, in an age where the empiricism of many scientists minimizes or eliminates the role of God in our universe. His main thesis--that science helps us uncover the hidden code in creation which clearly reveals that God is more than just a Creator--is demonstrated by his own experience and that of other scientists as well as by illustrations of God's plan inherent in the world around us.
I've read this book twice and I will probably read it yet again. Along with Paul Davies's book The Mind of God, this book is a must for anyone wishing to explore the ways science can prove God's existence and plan.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Angela Davis on November 30, 2005
Format: Hardcover
The Hidden Face of God: Science Reveals the Ultimate Truth by Gerald L. Schroeder has the potential to strike and interest in believers and non-believers alike. Schroeder takes a very disturbing position for some due to the face that he turns the ideas of science and uses them to support religious ideas. Most people in the world of science and religion would find this blasphemous, but when looked at closer I feel that Schroeder is on to something rather phenomenal. Gerald uses a great amount of scientific knowledge to prove his point and I would like to further examine this argument made by him.

I found that the best way to fully review Schroeder's work would be to go chapter by chapter, due to the science is divided up that way in his book. Not to mention this just makes more sense to follow the organization style of the book when reviewing it. So let us begin with Chapter one in Schroeder's evaluation of science and the capabilities it has to help the argument for religious believers.

Chapter One is entitled The Puzzle of Existence: An Overview and takes on the great feat of taking on an understanding of the metaphysical and therefore he argues that you cannot describe theology without insights of science, since the physical is needed to describe the metaphysical. I found this and ingenious way of thinking of things and must say that I agree with him. His second chapter ties into this, as well as all of the others, but one question he raised was, "How does one imagine, or even relate to, images [absolute]?" Another interesting concept that was brought up was how the universe was born as an undifferentiated unity, and how science today is trying to rediscover this.
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