Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Hidden Ireland: A Study of Gaelic Munster in the Eighteenth Century Paperback – December, 1983


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$25.17
Paperback, December, 1983
$73.42 $12.20
Unknown Binding, Import
"Please retry"
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 285 pages
  • Publisher: Gill & MacMillan (December 1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0717100790
  • ISBN-13: 978-0717100798
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5 x 7.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,692,618 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The end point of the Elizabethan and Cromwellian clearances in Ireland was not just the subjection of its native people and the appropriation of its land and natural wealth; it was a nearly total erasure of its language and culture, its mythology, and its centuries-old systems of aristocracy, education and poetic patronage. But in the southwest of Ireland tatters of this culture stayed stubbornly alive, just long enough to be recorded by an emerging movement of folklorists, historians, nationalists and poets in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In 1925 Daniel Corkery published THE HIDDEN IRELAND: A Study of Gaelic Munster in the Eighteenth Century (current edition, Gill and Macmillan), which helped restore the old culture to sight by telling the story of its demise, and conferred on the declassed scholar-poets a new mythic presence. Reading the book even now, the story has a lost-continent feel to it: a complete and functioning culture, lingering in the overlooked rural corners of a conquered land. And even in Corkery’s bald and literal cribs, we recognize in these poems the heroic currents of sorrow, intimacy and rage unique to Irish verse.

Glenn Shea, from Glenn's Book Notes, at www.bookbarnniantic.com
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Martin O'riordan on November 25, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Not satisfied with your literary outlook? Well this might be worth a

look. Takes some research though,but, in the end worth it.

With science now running the universities in all but name, the idea of

study simply for the love of study looks rather inane when contrasted with

the vast output of infotainment by the mass media.

Reading Corkery could help you to see through a lot of this, and help

you to form your thoughts according to your own particular genius,

whatever that may be. I think it has more than an Irish application,

thinking of a scene that could have been familiar to some of the poets

in the book, the lines of Grey's Elegy comes to mind. So love of poetry

applies to all races.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again