Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

The Histories (Oxford World's Classics) New edition Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0192824257
ISBN-10: 0192824252
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
More Buying Choices
9 New from $7.45 68 Used from $0.01 1 Collectible from $130.00

There is a newer edition of this item:

Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Save Up to 90% on Textbooks Textbooks

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Carolyn Dewald is Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Southern California. Robin Waterfield is a distinguished translator whose version of Plato's Republic has been described as `the best available'.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE



Product Details

  • Series: Oxford World's Classics
  • Paperback: 796 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; New edition edition (September 15, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0192824252
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192824257
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 1.5 x 5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,052,176 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This Oxford Classics edition has much to recommend it. First, it is translated into smooth modern English, which, while not conveying every subtlety of Greek, will nontheless help the present-day reader through this long work. Second, the price is under $10. Third, there is an excellent map collection at the back showing the ancient world as we see it and as Herodotus saw it. The notes, bibliography, appendices, indexes, timeline and glossary all make this a great resource for the student or casual reader. There is enough mention of content in all the other reviews. I just wanted to point out the advantages of this edition.
1 Comment 76 of 80 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This new translation by Robin Waterfield is smooth, colloquial, and easily readable, comparable to Robert Fagles' outstanding new translations of Homer's Illiad and Odessey. Carolyn Dewald has provided 150 pages of detailed and highly useful notes, all unobtrusively placed at the end of the book. Ten maps show virtually every geographical detail needed to follow Herodotus's tour around the known world, and a detailed index makes finding people--though not keywords--easy. All in all, an enjoyable read.
Comment 26 of 27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Herodotus's Histories are a treasure trove of wisdom, anecdotes and sheer joy. In the words of Robert D. Kaplan, "Thucydides may have been the more trustworthy historian, but Herodotus would have been more fun to share a wineskin with--and is a better guide to the god-filled geopolitics of the current era." (Kaplan's remarkable article on Herodotus, titled "A Historian for our Time", is available at [...]

I fully agree with other reviewers about the beauty of this translation, which results in a fluent and pleasant text. I am also overwhelmed at the abundance of notes and commentaries about perhaps most paragraphs in the book.

The problem is, while the translation increases our reading pleasure, the organization of this edition does not help the reader: the use of endnotes rather than footnotes means that readers have to keep moving to and fro between the text and the end of the book. Worse still, there is no footnote numbering, so readers must turn at virtually every paragraph to the end of the book, so as not to miss possible clarification. Eventually, I decided to check before reading each of the nine chapters ("Books") and mark the endnoted paragraphs myself.

Perhaps Oxford's intention was, as another reviewer put it, to ensure that notes were "unobtrusive" and the reader would have the clean text before his eyes. I beg to differ: few modern readers could do without the additional explanations provided in the notes. And, if they felt they could, or so wished, they would have a wealth of translations to choose from, much poorer in notes than this one.

I think no other edition of the "Histories" has so many maps. These are necessary and helpful. But they could have been clearer. In some of them, it is hard to tell land from sea, for example.
Read more ›
1 Comment 19 of 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I don't think any other work I've read has allowed me to live into how it was to live in a time so remote from our own. This really strikes me as an astounding achievement. I don't have a very good oversight over what other resources are available to historians about the daily goings on in in Greece and the Middle East at that period, but I find myself thinking as I read, "What if he had just decided not to write it?"

I had a very hard time with the place names in the first version I borrowed from the library, so I'm very glad for the maps in this edition. Also now some years later, I've forgotten all but the biggest names (but I still remember Cyrus!), and there are a daunting number of names in the book. But for all that, it's sort of an easy read, because it's anecdotal. I remember what happened, and more or less what order it happened in. I remember the major nations and what they were like -- the Persians, the Scythians, the Lacedaemons,...) More importantly, I remember the tenor of the book and of the times. I have a sense for the role that the gods and oracles played, the number of wars an average person experienced in their lifetime, the consequences of war, the relationship between men and women, the sort of thing which motivated nations to do what they did. (I detect no bigotry or chauvenism in Herodotus.) And it's just replete with very good 'histories' of all sorts, which will stay with me forever -- the circumnavigation of Africa, the Babylonian queen who diverted the river in a huge engineering project to protect the city, the Scythians rites, his impressions of the amazing Egyptian labyrinth, the fabulous hearsay about what the Northern climates were like.

And I'm left with a different perspective, I think, than I was before.
Read more ›
Comment 28 of 35 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
What amazed me about this book was Herodotus'curiosity and lack of ethnocentrisism. Herdotus wasn't simply interested in chronicling major events, but delving deeper to understand why the events occured in the first place. Furthermore, he does something that many scholars and policy makers today should do more of; that is, he trys to understand other cultures in order to make more sence of their actions. In this endeavor, he should not only be called the "Father of History", but also the Father of Anthropology. But, perhaps he understood way back then that history and anthropology, as well as geography are all complimentary.

While Herodotus - being a Greek himself - undoubtedly sees the Greeks as heroes in their struggle against the Persian invasion, he shows them to be extremely jealous, greedy, arrogant and even treacherous. This is something that many of the ancient world - including the Greek world - would rarely do to their own kind. Therefore, Herodotus is also one of the first examples of someone critquing their own culture.

Herodotus makes it clear that the causes of conflict were complex - often stemming from selfishness, such as the Greek Histiaeus wanting to start an Ionian revolt just so he could leave the Persian court - and the "heroes" were no knights in shining armour. The best example is Themistocles, who was instrumental in saving Athens due to his insistence in forcing a sea battle in the Salamis straights. Rather than dying with the reputation as a heroe, he ended his life in excile collaborating with the Persians against Greece. It would be as if after leading the Americans to victory in the American Revelution and being President, George Washington was exciled to England and became and an advisor to the British king on how to retake America.
Read more ›
Comment 6 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Want to discover more products? Check out these pages to see more: capture argo, corpse thieves