Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.00
  • Save: $8.14 (34%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The History of Latin America: Collision of Cultures (Palgrave Essential Histories Series) Paperback – June 12, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-1403980816 ISBN-10: 1403980810 Edition: First Edition

Buy New
Price: $15.86
35 New from $8.65 44 Used from $5.29
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.86
$8.65 $5.29
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books

Frequently Bought Together

The History of Latin America: Collision of Cultures (Palgrave Essential Histories Series) + The Atlantic Slave Trade (New Approaches to the Americas) + Resilient Cultures: America's Native Peoples Confront European Colonization 1500-1800 (2nd Edition)
Price for all three: $100.75

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Series: Palgrave Essential Histories Series
  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Trade; First Edition edition (June 12, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1403980810
  • ISBN-13: 978-1403980816
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1.1 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #153,793 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for Brazil: The Once and Future Country:
"The best short survey of Brazil since the anthropologist Charles Wagley's 1963 classic, An Introduction to Brazil."--Kenneth Maxwell, Foreign Affairs
 
"Eakin's clear organizational framework combines with his taut prose to produce a highly readable and informative history of Latin America. Students will want to turn first to The History of Latin America: Collision of Cultures to begin their education in the history of this fascinating region."
--Todd A. Diacon, Professor of History, Vice Provost for Academic Operations, The University of Tennessee

"This book is well-written and jargon-free, with accessible prose for the novice student of Latin America. Having used several different general survey texts in my introductory Latin American Studies course, I can truly say that this is my favorite."--Erin Minzenberg, Miami University, The Latin Americanist

About the Author

Marshall C. Eakin is Professor of History at Vanderbilt University and Executive Director of the Brazilian Studies Association (BRASA).  A specialist in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Brazilian history, he is the author of British Enterprise in Brazil (1989); Brazil: The Once and Future Country (1997); and Tropical Capitalism: The Industrialization of Belo Horizonte, Brazil (2001).  Eakin has also created two video courses with the Teaching Company: "Conquest of the Americas" and "The Americas in the Revolutionary Era."  He is a noted authority on the region, and has written many journal and magazine articles on Latin American history, culture, and politics as well as contributing to travel guides.  He lives in Nashville, TN.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Remi J. Dobbs on August 25, 2009
Format: Paperback
I'd like to start by saying that Latin American history is a subject that anyone interested in politics should make themselves familiar with. While many history and polisci buffs have a good deal of American and European history under their belts, but they don't realize that there are 21 politically advanced countries that they have little to no knowledge of.

Beyond this, Latin American history is comparatively easy to learn, as unlike Europe or the Middle East, there are relatively few influences, which Eakin describes as a collision of 3 cultures--European (specifically Iberian), African, and Amerindian. My review on this book will focus more on history books as a whole than on the History of Latin America : Collision of Cultures, because what it does is avoids the pitfalls that many other histories fall for.

The first difficulty when it comes to writing a history book is what narrative to take. Too simplistic a narrative will show that you have an axe to grind, which may give you book sales, but will make the book worse when it comes to education value. However, this is made slightly easier by the subject. Compared to the myriad influences of Europe and the Middle East, which make any detailed narrative come out as rather inane, for instance, everyone agrees that the Crusades influenced Europe and the Middle East. However, how much did the Crusades influence these regions? Is the narrative of crusade and counter-crusade an appropriate view to take? By writing over such a long period, Eakin is able to partially avoid the problem of narrative--because with such a great deal of facts to deal with in such a small amount of space, it's rather hard to insert a story into all of these events.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Zander on May 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
You have to expect that any book covering more than one year of history per page is going to be a survey, and this is a good one. The author has a clear and comfortable style, command of his facts, and tenable theses. The book is littered with references to other materials you will be tempted to pursue.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Brian Griffith on April 27, 2009
Format: Paperback
Eakin is an ever interesting guide to almost the whole continent. He's sensitive to how myriads of struggles appeared to all groups involved. His focus is wide, but with certain boundaries. He only glances at Native cultures before contact with Europe, because "Latin America" only appeared with the mixing of worlds and races. He basically omits mention of the Mexican regions seized by the United States, or of areas colonized by non-Iberians such as the Guyanas, Suriname, Belize, and Jamaica. But he covers Haiti. Almost everywhere Natives, Africans and Latin White folks mixed together, Eakin tells the tale.

The book gives helpful background on what "Liberal" and "Conservative" have meant in these parts of the world. But the political options advanced by Native comminities seem basically overlooked in the Liberal-Conservative crossfire. The long-running tension between managed and unregulated economies gets a general, even-handed account. But the nationalist response to US-backed corporate interests is better explored by Naomi Klein.

For most of the book Eakin gives theme-based surveys of the whole continent. Then he gives brief, insightful summaries on each nation. But I wanted more light on Colombia's disturbing troubles. I think the book offers more insight on many smaller countries, including the Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, Paraguay, and even Puerto Rico, than it gives on Colombia.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By toronto on February 2, 2008
Format: Paperback
i bought this book to get a refresher on Latin American history, and while it does that, it has some limitations other readers might consider before buying it. The first, and most important, is that the area I was most interested in -- 1600-1800 -- hardly exists in the book. I had to go out and get a copy of Bakewell's book (far superior for this period, and except for the last section, throughout superior) instead. The second limitation is that the book hardly goes in for quotations or pictures or anything really lively -- it is all more or less at one note. But it is not a bad note: the author clearly knows his stuff, and the book picks up towards the end.

A second edition rewrite would do a lot!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Robbie Dee on June 19, 2012
Format: Paperback
The first 300 or so pages of this book are a decent read. Factual, without a doubt, and a great introduction into the complex relationships of the inhabitants of spanish and, to a lesser degree, portuguese america. It is a little like going around the world in six weeks, however. You can scratch the surface but you never really get under it.

The writer takes a decidedly biased turn when describing events in the region from the early 20th century to the present time. Although he mentions it, he clearly down plays the enormous impact of U.S. political interference in much of Latin America and the Caribbean. Why, asks the rest of the world, does the United States of America get so freaked out at the mere mention of the word 'socialism'? It would be fair to say the author is sympathetic to the notion that U.S. economic interests take precedence over the rights of the indigenous people, regardless of nationality. But then, such has been the story of the United States of America itself.

The book takes an even stranger turn in chapter 20 when the author tries to convince us that reform is a more effective vehicle for change than revolution, conveniently omitting that were it not for a revolution his country might still be in negotiations for independence and he might still be paying taxes to the British crown!
And conveniently forgetting that were it not for a revolution, his wealthy countrymen might still be littering the streets of Habana with green-backs as they stumble drunk from the casinos... And the cubans might still be living in poverty, eating dirt, illiterate and lacking health care!
But then the author also conveniently forgets that Cuba is not the U.S.A.!!!

If you are looking for an introduction into Latin American history from October 12, 1492 until the early 20th century, parts 1 through 3 will suffice. For a history of the twentieth century and into the present, look elsewhere.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?