Qty:1
  • List Price: $37.00
  • Save: $11.72 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used item that shows moderate wear and tear. Eligible for discounts under Amazon Prime and Super Saver Shipping. Shipping, service, and returns handled by Amazon.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The History of Statistics: The Measurement of Uncertainty before 1900 Paperback – March 31, 1990

ISBN-13: 978-0674403413 ISBN-10: 067440341X Edition: Reprint

Buy New
Price: $25.28
27 New from $20.74 23 Used from $7.91
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$25.28
$20.74 $7.91

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

The History of Statistics: The Measurement of Uncertainty before 1900 + Statistics on the Table: The History of Statistical Concepts and Methods + The Lady Tasting Tea: How Statistics Revolutionized Science in the Twentieth Century
Price for all three: $66.89

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Belknap Press; Reprint edition (March 31, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 067440341X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674403413
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #250,981 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

One is tempted to say that the history of statistics in the nineteenth century will be associated with the name Stigler. (Morris Kline New York Times Book Review)

An exceptionally searching, almost loving, study of the relevant inspirations and aberrations of its principal characters James Bernoulli, de Moivre, Bayes, Laplace, Gauss, Quetelet, Lexis, Galton, Edgeworth, and Pearson, not neglecting a grand supporting cast… The definitive record of an intellectual Golden Age, an overoptimistic climb to a height not to be maintained. (M. Stone Science)

In this tour de force of careful scholarship, Stephen Stigler has laid bare the people, ideas, and events underlying the development of statistics… He has written an important and wonderful book… Sometimes Stigler’s prose is so evocative it is almost poetic. (Howard Wainer Contemporary Psychology)

The book is a pleasure to read: the prose sparkles; the protagonists are vividly drawn; the illustrations are handsome and illuminating; the insights plentiful and sharp. This will remain the definitive work on the early development of mathematical statistics for some time to come. (Lorraine J. Daston Journal of Modern History)

Stigler’s book exhibits a rare combination of mastery of technical materials, sensitivity to conceptual milieu, and near exhaustive familiarity with primary sources. An exemplary study. (Lorraine Daston)

Review

Stigler's book exhibits a rare combination of mastery of technical materials, sensitivity to conceptual milieu, and near exhaustive familiarity with primary sources. An exemplary study
--Lorraine Daston --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

55 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Chris McKinstry on January 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is THE definitive work on the early development of statistics. Obviously written by a man in love with his subject. Bernoulli, de Moivre, Bayes, Laplace, Gauss, Quetelet, Lexis, Galton, Edgeworth and Pearson all but come alive. I particularly enjoyed the reproductions of first sources included that you would otherwise have to travel to Paris to see.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Michael R. Chernick on February 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
Stigler is unrivaled as a statistician who researches the history of statistics. This covers the famous mathematicians and statisticians who developed the foundation on which probability and statistics blossomed in the 20th Century. He is thorough and accurate and his writing is always clear and interesting. After reading this try Salsburg's "Lady Tasting Tea" to see how Fisher, Cramer, Neyman and Pearson and Kolmogorov and others formally developed probabilty and mathematical statistics as important disciplines in the 20th Century.

Always enjoyable and enlightening, Stigler brings an unparalleled degree of scholarship to the essays.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Diego Banducci on July 4, 2003
Format: Paperback
Professor Stigler is an academic, and writes like one. He is obviously knowledgeable; this book will appeal to professional statisticians.

For intelligent laymen with a general interest in the history of statistics, Against the Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk by Peter Bernstein and The Lady Tasting Tea: How Statistics Revolutionized Science in the Twentieth Century by David Salsburg will be equally informative and far more enjoyable. Both authors are as knowledgeable as Professor Stigler, but write more clearly.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By William Addington on January 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I love history of mathematics books like this one that have the guts to delve into the actual mathematics involved while retaining a narrative thread. I use it with my children to illustrate why mathematics is important. What problems were people trying to solve? How solutions were arrived at in steps over time rather than as deus ex machina. This is much more effective than presenting mathematics as most schools, out of context as a series of recipes. The book is divided into three main parts:

The Development of Mathematical Statistics in Astronomy and Geodesy before 1827

The Struggle to Extend a Calculus of Probabilities to the Social Sciences

A Breakthorugh in Studies of Heredity
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search