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759 of 823 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What we can expect in the EXTENDED EDITION.
WHAT WILL WE SEE IN THE EXTENDED EDITION:

1. More of DALE, including the BLACK ARROWS. Director Peter Jackson mentions a previously unseen character: "Girion, who is defending [the city of] Dale using black arrows against Smaug. And the black arrows play a part in an ongoing story, for they are the one thing that can pierce the dragon's hide."

2...
Published 13 months ago by Anthony L.

versus
4,267 of 4,815 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Wait until Chrismas 2013
Almost clicked the order button, but due to my love of the extended versions of the original trilogy, I decided to do a little research before I made that mistake. in doing so, I discovered that the Blue-Ray/DVD set for release on March 19th will contain only the theatrical version of the movie. Warner Bros is including a teaser trailer containing Dragon Smaug with this...
Published 18 months ago by Home Brew


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759 of 823 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What we can expect in the EXTENDED EDITION., August 6, 2013
By 
WHAT WILL WE SEE IN THE EXTENDED EDITION:

1. More of DALE, including the BLACK ARROWS. Director Peter Jackson mentions a previously unseen character: "Girion, who is defending [the city of] Dale using black arrows against Smaug. And the black arrows play a part in an ongoing story, for they are the one thing that can pierce the dragon's hide."

2. More king of the wood elves; THRANDUIL. Peter Jackson: "There are also issues with Thranduil. We get some of the reason why he and the dwarves had a falling out - to do with these white gems..."

3. More of HOBBITON. Producer Phillipa Boyens: "You are going to get more of Hobbiton. We always wanted to wend our way through Hobbiton, but in the end Bilbo has to run out of the door."

4. The OLD TOOK'S PARTY: In which we see a younger Gandalf meet Bilbo Baggins as a young child, convincing the wizard of the young hobbit's bravery and courage. I won't spoil it for you, but it involves a dragon and a bit of magic.

5. Dwarf antics at RIVENDELL. Peter Jackson: "You are going to get some serious Dwarvish disrespect of the elves at Rivendell." Bofur leads the troupe in a rowdy chorus of "The Man in the Moon", a classic Tolkien pub-song.

6. The SONG of the GOBLIN KING. Producer Fran Walsh: "You are going to get more Goblin Town, and the Great Goblin singing his song. It is a great song, but it was just another delay in terms of moving the story along." Peter Jackson: "A number one hit from the Goblin King. Barry Humphries is going to rise up the charts!"

Well, all looking good on these fronts! The roads lead ever on and on...
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362 of 400 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Hobbit Amazon Exclusive Extended Edition, August 5, 2013
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The packaging is great, the slipcase is thick and sturdy and the back features an embossed acorn emblem of Bilbo's waist coat buttons. The case that the Blu-Ray discs are in is black, just like the Lord Of The Rings Extended Edition Blu-Ray set. Not a blue case like most other Blu-Ray movies which I think makes this version cohesive with the Lord Of The Rings set, which I as a fan appreciate the continuity. The special features are as follows:

-The Filmmakers' Commentary - Director/writer/producer Peter Jackson and writer/co-producer Philippa Boyens provide their perspective and stories on creating the first film.

-New Zealand: Home of Middle-Earth - From Matamata to Queenstown, travel with Peter Jackson and his team across the stunning locations of New Zealand, transformed by the filmmakers into Middle-Earth.

-The Appendices Part 7: A Long-Expected Journey - A 14-part chronological history of the filming of An Unexpected Journey, covering pre-production in the various departments of the film in the months leading up to the start of principal photography, the boot camp training for the main cast, and the work done on set chronologically through the three shooting blocks and in the world of its digital effects. Chapters include:

*The Journey Back to Middle-Earth
*Riddles in the Dark: Gollum's Cave
*An Unexpected Party: Bag End
*Roast Mutton: Trollshaws Forest
*Bastion of the Greenwood: Rhosgobel
*A Short Rest: Rivendell and London
*Over Hill: The Misty Mountains
*Under Hill: Goblin Town
*Out of the Frying Pan: The Forest Ledge
*Return to Hobbiton: The Shire
*The Epic of Scene 88: Strath Taieri
*The Battle of Moria: Azanulbizar
*Edge of the Wilderland: Pick-ups and the Carrock
*Home Is Behind, the World Is Ahead

-The Appendices Part 8: Return to Middle-Earth - Another selection of documentaries and featurettes, further detailing the development, design and production of An Unexpected Journey:

-The Company of Thorin - Explores the characters and backgrounds of the five families of dwarves and the company of actors chosen to play Thorin's company on the Quest of the Lonely Mountain. Chapters include:

*Assembling the Dwarves
*Thorin, Fili & Kili
*Balin & Dwalin
*Oin & Gloin
*Dori, Nori & Ori
*Bifur, Bofur & Bombur

-Mr. Baggins: The 14th Member - A revealing look at the film's charismatic and talented lead actor, Martin Freeman.

-Durin's Folk: Creating the Dwarves - Reveals the journey and process of designing, conceptualizing and physically realizing the dwarves in The Hobbit.

-The Peoples and Denizens of Middle-Earth - Focuses on the realization of new characters and creatures encountered in the first film, from casting to characterization to physical and digital design. Chapters include:

*The Stone Trolls
*Radagast the Brown
*Goblins
*Azog the Defiler

-Realms of the Third Age: From Bag End to Goblin Town - Follows the creation of the Middle-Earth locations from conceptual design to set and prop building to fully digital realities. Realms explored include:

*Hobbiton
*Rhosgobel
*The Misty Mountains
*Goblin Town

-The Songs of The Hobbit - A look at the realization of Tolkien's songs in An Unexpected Journey.
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4,267 of 4,815 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Wait until Chrismas 2013, March 1, 2013
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Almost clicked the order button, but due to my love of the extended versions of the original trilogy, I decided to do a little research before I made that mistake. in doing so, I discovered that the Blue-Ray/DVD set for release on March 19th will contain only the theatrical version of the movie. Warner Bros is including a teaser trailer containing Dragon Smaug with this version in order to entice people to buy it. The extended version of 'The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey' will be released in time for Christmas 2013. As with the Lord of the Rings Trilogy, Warner Bros. is trying to stick it to the consumer again by hoping people will buy both versions. Sorry, WB... I can wait another nine months. In the meantime, I'll rent a copy to satisfy my urge to see it sooner.
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1,185 of 1,444 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ignore the naysayers!, December 14, 2012
This movie is FREAKING AMAZING!!! I was getting really worried before going to see it because of some negative reviews, but there is nothing to worry about. If you loved the Lord of the Rings movies, especially the extended editions, then you will love The Hobbit too!

A little bit about me: I grew up on the animated movies, read the books when I was in sixth grade, and have reread them several times over the years. I'm a HUGE fan, but not a "purist", and saw each of the live action films several times in the theaters. I took a class on Tolkien in college (and knew more about the books than even the teacher lol), went to view the original manuscripts at Marquette University in Milwaukee twice, and borrowed most of the History of Middle Earth books from the library but just skimmed them. I'm pretty familiar with much of the appendices/deleted chapters/abandoned attempts at revising The Hobbit and sequelizing Lord of the Rings, etc.

I've been waiting for The Hobbit since 2003, and have been following the production online. When it was announced 5 months ago that Peter Jackson was splitting the story into 3 films (after already completing production on the 2-film adaptation), my heart sank. It's not that I was opposed to turning The Hobbit into a trilogy (despite that it's meant to be a children's story and not an epic), but I just didn't think there was enough story and it seemed like a cash grab that would probably destroy the pacing. But, Peter Jackson hasn't let me down before and so I held out hope. In fact the more I heard him talk about giving the dwarves a bit more character development and backstory and adding in all the stuff about the White Council, I began to look forward to it.

When a couple weeks ago reviews starting coming in saying that, as I had first feared, the movie dragged and the pacing was terrible, I prepared myself for disappointment. Even though hardcore fans on messageboards like theonering.net who had seen the movie early kept saying it was terrific, the negative reviews from professional critics kept coming in. The movie is "bloated" and "dull" and "misses the point", they said. And so I was VERY nervous going to see the movie this afternoon.

I'm pleased to say that not only is the movie incredible, but it's on par with the Lord of the Rings movies. I haven't felt this way about a movie since Fellowship of the Ring 10 years ago. I haven't been able to stop thinking about it all night, and I can't wait till I can go see it again. I sat in the theater for nearly three hours with the biggest grin on my face the entire time. The movie didn't feel bloated or stretched thin to me. I was worried that there would be all these scenes that went on too long or belonged on the cutting room floor, but I can't think of anything I would have left out. It was like watching the book acted out on the screen in front of me with really great acting, music, and production values.

The cinematography has really improved in the last 10 years! Wow this movie is beautifully shot! Howard Shore's music is once again great, though there are some little deletions and changes from the Original Soundtrack -- the only one that really bugged me though was the use of the Nazgul theme over Thorin fighting Azog. There was better music there in the Original Soundtrack and changing it was a horrible decision.

I love the added stuff with the White Council/Necromancer. It's all there in Tolkien's appendices and in "Unfinished Tales", and (blasphemy for saying so) depending on how this continues to play out over the next two movies I may end up liking this even better than the book! Either the next film or the one after that will have the Battle of Dol Goldur and, from what I've heard, we will see Gandalf, Saruman, Radagast, and Galadriel battling werewolves and giant spiders as they try to drive out the Necromancer. I can just imagine how awesome that will be if Peter Jackson pulls it off!

And, yes, this felt to me like a complete movie. One of the reasons I originally hated the idea of a trilogy was I expected to feel short changed by only seeing a small fraction of the story and then having to wait another year. But I felt like there was plenty of story and they got into plenty of adventures.

My only nitpicks are few: I liked the design of the Great Goblin but I thought he acted way too cartoony. My other is there were a couple times where Bilbo and the dwarves fell from a height of like 500 feet and just got back up. They would have been killed. I also thought the character Azog was fine, but why did he have to be all CGI? Why couldn't it have been an actor in makeup like Lurtz in Fellowship of the Ring? Those are really my only nitpicks though.

As I sat in the theater I had a feeling like this is one of the best filmgoing experiences I've ever had. I had the same feeling watching Lord of the Rings. As someone who originally hated the idea of making this into a trilogy, now I say bring it on!!!

UPDATE: I got to see the movie in 48 frames per second (HFR 3D) yesterday. I had only seen it in regular 24fps 3D before. 24fps has been the standard for film since the Silent movie days. The Hobbit is the first movie to be shot at 48fps to give it a sharper look. Unfortunately the technology is new so only a few theaters are equipped to even show it at 48fps. Many of the reviewers were saying they hated it, that it looks like a BBC TV movie. I was still curious to give it a try because it's new technology and it's how Peter Jackson intended you to see the movie, but I didn't want it to distract from my first viewing if I ended up not liking it, so we saw the movie first at 24fps 3D.

Anyway, I liked it and I didn't think it looked "cheap" or like a "soap opera" at all. It looked really sharp and there were some parts where the people looked like they were really right in front of you. In addition to that, motion blur is completely gone now and I've heard from other people who get headaches from watching 3D movies that they were fine watching this one, thanks to the 48fps.

Peter Jackson has confirmed that there WILL be an extended edition dvd/blu ray like they did with the Lord of the Rings movies. So you may want to hold out from buying the theatrical dvd when it comes out and get the extended edition.
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312 of 399 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars GREAT CHARACTER DEPTH added to BEAUTIFUL CINEMATOGRAPHY, January 3, 2013
By 
Chris Kennison (Jefferson City, Mo United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
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Are you ready to return to middle-earth? Why wouldn't you be? Peter Jackson, with the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy, brought us to a place that many thought wasn't possible except in the written form. A product of many of our childhoods, J.R.R. Tolkien constructed an elaborate world of wizards, trolls, elves, dwarves, humans and most importantly Hobbits. It is an elaborately detailed world of maps, homelands, stories and adventures. It couldn't possibly be realized anywhere close to what J.R.R. Tolkien's imagination did. Yet, Jackson pulled it off better than anyone could have hoped. Now, he's trying again.

"The Hobbit" is a step backward into the history of middle-earth. It is quite simply the adventure that Bilbo Baggins takes that leads to him writing his book, "There and back again". Peter Jackson is trying to do the unthinkable with this trilogy, duplicate the magic he pulled off before. Much can be told from this first installment and whether or not the magic is still there.

The movie, filmed at twice frame-speed as traditional film (48 frames) has many geeks talking about how it will look too real. Ultimately, at 48 frames, it could look as crisp and real as a soap opera. Well, first of all, with a film like this, it takes a lot of guts to attempt such a thing; a movie with such obvious special effects and makeup. Yet, the opposite could also be achieved; a level of escapism and realism that not only delivers a quality movie experience, but also sucks you into a world that you don't want to leave.

Peter Jackson has learned a few things from his first trilogy and you can see it in "The Hobbit". This world is even more realized. The characters are more fleshed out. Richard Armitage's depiction of Thorin is full of heart and passion. The faithfulness to the book itself is even more realized. More importantly, the journey is even more colorful and creative.

"The Hobbit" is a lot of the same. It's another journey full of adventure and trolls, dwarves and orcs, but again, it is a quality journey. The escapism you feel in this film is like nothing you've ever felt before. When it was time to go, at the end of the film, I didn't want to. I was there. I was in middle-earth, ready to take the journey ahead with Bilbo, Gandolff and the band of Dwarves. I didn't care about length or how long I had been sitting there. I was invested. That, is really all any movie can do.
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133 of 174 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing movie, December 14, 2012
I have four words for you: Erebor, Thranduil, Rivendell, and Elrond. (In order of appearance, of course!)

This movie was absolutely gorgeous. Costumes, effects, design, everything was amazing. The Radagast sections didn't need to be quite so long but I do appreciate that PJ's trying to get the Dol Goldur/Necromancer bits in. Similarly, Galadriel's comments about Angmar and Rhudaur probably will be incomprehensible to the average watcher but they do hold a deeper significance. (Elrond's 'watchful peace' comment, anyone?)

You can tell where the scenes slow a bit - in a more 'taking our sweet time telling the story' fashion - but it does take some energy from the Lord of the Rings in its battle scenes. It is a fresher, younger look at the world of Middle-Earth between Morgoth and Sauron and the environments and attitudes of the characters reflect that. Each dwarf manages to be unique (Bofur turned out to be my favorite, honestly, for his frank oddness) and makes an impact, and McKellen and Freeman are fantastic. There's a very Arthur Dent air about Bilbo, but it works wonderfully.

I hadn't expected Thranduil in this movie, so his appearance nearly sent me into a faint.

This is a MUST SEE.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars An Unexpected Travesty, September 24, 2013
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To be fair to the director it's hard to top the Epic Saga of LOTR Trilogy, and anyone who has read the Book would likely expect a lighter and less epic adventure then the Lord of the Rings. Still I was expecting a series movie with a decent story and great dialog. Unfortunately this film is greatly dumbed down. The Trolls are dumber, the action scenes are very cliche, and the introduction of the BROWN WIZARD is real shift from what was an amazing Saga, to a Cartoonish Spinoff. This Film reminded me so much of Star Wars the Phantom Menace. When George Lucus produced the Prequels, they really seemed to be cheap imitations of what was once original and mesmerizing. They had amazing Special Effects and Stunning Computer Graphics, but the character lines were cheesy, the storyline dull and unoriginal, action scenes were punctuated by long drawn out awkward scenes, and of coarse Jar Jar Binks. The Hobbit bears many of the same shortcomings. The dialogue is not that great, there many long drawn out scenes punctuated by action scenes that come across as more comical and childish then serious. Worst of all is that Jar Jar Binks-like character, The Brown Wizzard, No offense to Mr. Binks, he's the man if your a kid, but cartoonish characters don't belong in classic epics made for adults. They belong in Pixir or Disney movies for young kids who don't care about dialog or plot but just want to see something witty with some action scenes. The scene of The Brown Wizzard flying through the forest on a sled pulled by deer was a real turnoff for me, and made me think I was watching a children's movie. This film is great if your Eleven, or Seven, or even 14, but if your 25 and older and enjoy serious movies with a complex plot and well written scenes, then you may be in for an Unexpected Travesty.
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25 of 31 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Just OK, March 25, 2013
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I am very familiar with Tolkien's work, having read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings several times, as well as the Silmarillion. The Hobbit, of course, is in a sense a prequel to the Lord of the Rings, having been written by Bilbo Baggins, Frodo Baggins' uncle. The movie follows the general course of the book, without too many deviations, beginning with an unexpected party and moving from there. There is a little contrived conflict, with Thorin resisting visiting Rivendell and a little back story fleshing out, with a meeting of the White Council. Another, more major change, was the creation of Azog, as the main antagonist to Thorin Oakenshield (in the LOTR appendixes, Dain of the Iron Hills killed Azog and it was his son Bolg who lead the attacking orcs), not a big deal though.

Peter Jackson has spent an awful lot of time making certain that the Middle Earth landscape and cultures are true to the books. The cinematography is amazing and the New Zealand landscape shines in the movie. For a fan of Tolkien it is a real treat to revisit these places with Jackson.

That said, the movie is just too long. I was afraid of this, when Jackson announced that there "was just too much material for two films" and he was making the Hobbit into three films.

The Hobbit deviates significantly from the "feel" of the Hobbit as a book. The book was a light hearted jaunt, with several battle scenes, but with much humor thrown in -- more of a children's story, really. On the other hand, the movie emphasizes fight scenes. However, the biggest difference to me, is in the characters of Bilbo and the dwarves. Tolkien shows the dwarves to be bumblers, constantly getting into trouble, requiring Gandalf or Bilbo to rescue them time after time. In the movie, Jackson reveals them to be battle hardened warriors, who each can single handedly take out half an orc regiment. Even Bilbo is pretty handy with his small sword, Sting, and battles a couple of orcs to a stand still.

Large sections of the movie feel like montages from a video game, with the dwarves and Gandalf decapitating and eviscerating hundreds of orcs. And while the CGI effects are very nicely done, all of this escapes one of the central themes of the book, which is that small people with big hearts, lots of courage and a little bit of luck can make big differences in the world.

In the end, I enjoyed the movie and will probably watch it again, but it really felt like too little material stretched thin.
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34 of 43 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Hobbit, as told from memory by a hyperactive six-year-old., April 19, 2013
This review is from: The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (Blu-ray) (Blu-ray)
Just finished watching this and was very disappointed. The Hobbit was a major book for me as a kid and seeing it treated as though it wasn't good enough for a movie was pretty tough. Within the first few seconds, the movie frames itself as a narration by Future Bilbo, thus notifying the viewer that Bilbo is never in any danger at any point in the story.

A great deal of effort is spent alluding to the LOTR trilogy of movies in an obvious, distracting way. While I was not happy to see this self-serving behavior, it was at least understandable - they want to sell DVDs. What was more confusing were numerous sequences of events from the past, illustrating or sometimes just replacing a character who is telling a story. Invariably, these past events are far more exciting, and hint at a much more interesting Middle Earth, than anything depicted in the current timeline of the movie. The end result was as if this movie was spliced together with clips from a much better movie which will never be made.

Huge sweeping liberties are taken with various characters, Radagast the Brown being a notable example. Can't wait to see what Beorn is like in the second movie!

During the scenes that the movie condescends to share with the actual book, perplexing changes are made to character dialogue, in ways which don't help to tell the story but rather serve only to dilute the language. This is not a trivial criticism; Tolkien was a scholar of languages and used language in dialogue in a very specific way to help describe the personality of his characters. To alter the diction of, e.g. the riddle game between Bilbo and Gollum, is to fundamentally change the story of what happened between those two characters in that cave. Bilbo is changed from quivering with fear to confident and a bit testy. And this is a scene which, in relative terms, came pretty much straight from the text.

More difficult to judge are scenes which never happened anywhere in print, including in the later-released material from Tolkien's notes discussing the background for the story. Much of this material is simply filler, giving the very clear impression that the filmmakers have nine hours to tell this story and intend to use every second of it whether they need to or not.

I paid $1.50 to borrow this Blu-Ray from RedBox and I think that was about the right price for the experience. It's a very pretty movie with swords and monsters and lots of action, so there is entertainment value, but it's not really The Hobbit.

It's The Hobbit as told from memory by a hyperactive six-year-old.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Steelbook waste of money, but the movie was great!, November 22, 2013
By 
michael winburn (astoria, ny United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Gave this presentation a 3 star.
a) There is absolutely nothing extra here from the NON steel book edition except the steel book
b) this Steelbook edition is actually the BestBuy exclusive...
c) 3 stars because despite the picture, the details card (that describes whats on which disc and the Audio Coding info, screen scope...you know, all the fine details you want to know about the discs... are just a non-clip on insert that only attaches to the tin when the pastic in on the case. Once you take the plastic wrap off, it falls off. its too big to put inside the Tin... unless you cut it up... so much for collector's value there.
If the Tin came with a slip case on back to insert it, i would have given this presentation a 4 star....
(that it presents nothing other than a steel case... well, i wouldn't give it extra stars for that.... the steelbook is a waste in my opinion, but there were not more copies of the extended edition 3D NON steelbook in all of bestbuy... so i was sold this steelbook edition at that reduced price... if they did not do this, i would certainly not have spent $70 for the steel book edition).
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The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (Blu-ray)
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (Blu-ray) by Peter Jackson (Blu-ray - 2013)
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