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The Holdeman People: The Church of God in Christ, Mennonite 1859-1969 Hardcover – January 1, 1973


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 663 pages
  • Publisher: William Carey Library Pub (January 1973)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0878084118
  • ISBN-13: 978-0878084111
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 1.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,597,078 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Another Reader on February 4, 2007
Format: Hardcover
It's no easy task to write deeply, and well, about the world's most 'closed' religious communities. The CGC,M is such a group; of all anabaptist groups outside of the Old Order Amish, they practice excommunication and avoidance most consistently. The CGC,M believes itself to be the "one true visible" church, in a line of succession from 'radical reformers' Menno Simons and Dirk Philips. Hiebert lays out the genealogy of John Holdeman and the impoverished, German-speaking immigrant communities in Manitoba and Kansas who were influenced by his message of the 'decay' of the Mennonite churches of the late 19th century. Hiebert then outlines the current positions and practices of the CGC,M as of 1973.

The book is now ~35 years old, and the author has passed away. Of course the text lacks an accounting of recent activity in Holdeman theology and practice. Still, Hiebert's work remains the authoritative account of this Mennonite movement, now numbering 20,000 followers globally.

"The Holdeman People" was written with depth and sensitivity. Highly recommended.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 20, 2003
Format: Hardcover
When I first read this book I throughly enjoyed it. I found it very interesting and informative. It is however not accurate in many respects. I can truthfully say this as I lived, worked, attended weddings, funerals, social and family gatherings,and even church. These good people also do not believe in pictures, but many pictures were taken without their knowledge or permission. Much of what the book bases "Church Beliefs on is also not accurate-there have been changes both in tradition and beliefs-for the good of all. Please consider this when reading this book. Everyone need not accept what someone believes, but it must be respected. Overall this book gave alot of valuable information, but some of the ways it was obtained did not do justice to the Holdeman people.
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