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The Holy Spirit: God's arm reaching in the physical world Paperback – November 27, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 120 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (November 27, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1481010700
  • ISBN-13: 978-1481010702
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.3 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,510,601 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Daniel C. Lawry has a Masters of Divinity degree from Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary in Schenectady, NY. He lives in Alplaus, NY, with his wife Angie and their eight children. Dan does fill-in preaching to help local pastors and does electrical engineering part time. He has a couple of patents in the area of electrical power transmission. He directed Camp Pattersonville for 16 summers, teaching about 250 children each year about the Lord Jesus. He also enjoys leading a Bible study at the Schenectady County Jail. Angie W. Lawry has a Bachelor’s degree in Music with a concentration in voice from the College of St. Rose. She has been involved in music ministry, children’s ministry, and women’s ministry, and also served with Dan at Camp Pattersonville. Currently, she works homeschooling their eight children and teaches various music classes for the local home school co-op. She is particularly concerned that kids growing up in the church are biblically grounded.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Lawrence C. Roff on December 11, 2012
Format: Paperback
I have read Dan's book on the deity of Christ, published about four years ago. I thought at the time that it was a very well-written and Biblically sound defense of the deity of Christ. I was happy to endorse it and to allow it to be distributed here in our church. I had one concern about it, which I thought was the result of my misunderstanding what he had written. It almost sounded like he was going too far (!), saying not only that Jesus was divine, but that He was actually a modalistic manifestation of the Yahweh covenant God of the Old Testament and not a second distinct person in the Trinity. Now that I look back at it, I think that is exactly what Dan was asserting. Now with this new book on the Holy Spirit, I believe that Dan has not only rejected the full separate divine personhood of Jesus, but has also distanced himself from the classic understanding of the doctrine of the Trinity. He has rejected the distinct personhood of the Holy Spirit as the third person of the Trinity (in what reads like a new version of the ancient heresy of Sabellianism, a.k.a. Modalism), and has even questioned whether Jesus could be called God during His incarnation (in what sounds like a revised version of the old heresy of Adoptionism). In so doing he has cut himself off from the consistent teaching of every branch of Christianity by teaching a doctrine rejected by Protestantism, Roman Catholicism, and even Eastern Orthodoxy. In his introduction he recognizes that he is challenging the historic definition of the Trinity as confirmed by all of the ecumenical councils in the earliest centuries of church history (Nicaea, Chalcedon, etc.) as well as the confessions and creeds of the Reformation and Puritan eras.Read more ›
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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Van McClain on May 23, 2013
Format: Paperback
Please do not buy or read this book. It is full of heretical teaching. The Lawrys deny God's triune nature. Lawry has Jesus saying, "I am the Father in a human body" (p. 10). Lawry writes that `Father,' `Son,' and `Spirit' are not names, but titles. He believes that Jesus is part of God, God extended down into the flesh. God is not three distinct persons, but there is one God who reveals Himself in three distinct masks or faces. The Lawrys teach a modalistic view of God. They claim that it was the Father in a human body who died on the cross. The truth is that it was God the Son who died on the cross, not God the Father. They also deny the eternal Sonship of God the Son. In the future, the Lawrys believe that Jesus will merge back into the Father and the Persons of the triune God will be no more. This book will only lead people away from the truth and confuse people.
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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful By David J. Bissett on February 7, 2013
Format: Paperback
I have also read the entire book, every page in detail, and must agree that it intentionally rejects the historic, biblical understanding of the Trinity (God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). This book teaches several false doctrines -- employing sloppy and inconsistent methods of interpretation as it leads its readers away from orthodoxy.

It is not recommended (it merits only one star so that this review can be written).
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Kergel on April 5, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a wonderful book, and a great reminder of How God' presence is always in our lives. It includes many references to the Bible, which is great because it inspires a lot of self study. I am really enjoying reading and studying along with this book.
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Christopher & Catherine Bailey on July 29, 2013
Format: Paperback
This book presents a clear view of The Trinity and grapples with some tough questions that have been raised throughout the ages. If you want to dive further in and further up, then give this a try. You'll be glad you did.
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