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The Home and the World Paperback – January 11, 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 340 pages
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (January 11, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0766182886
  • ISBN-13: 978-0766182882
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.9 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,952,467 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, Bengali (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Rabindranath Tagore (7th May 1861-7th August 1941), the writer and a Nobel laureate poet was the ambassador of Indian culture to the rest of the world. He is probably the most prominent figure in the cultural world of Indian subcontinent and the first Asian person to be awarded with the Nobel in 1913. Even though he is mainly known as a poet, his multifaceted talent showered upon different branches of art-novels, short stories, dramas, articles, essays, painting, etc. He was a social reformer, patriot and above all, a great humanitarian and philosopher. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Luan Gaines HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 26, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A prolific Bengalese writer, Tagore structured this novel such that three main characters represent the turbulence of the Partition that was yet to come to India in 1947. Nikhil is married to Bimala, living in the traditional domestic manner; for herself, Bimala has no expectation of her life ever deviating from her wifely path. The concept of "Swadeshi", a renewed appreciation of everything Indian, and a denial of everything British, particularly British imported goods and grains, rages throughout the country. The egocentric Sandip, a guest in Nikhil's home, is a fierce proponant of Swadeshi. Sandip finds himself passionately attracted to Bimala; he idealizes her as the epitome of "Mother" India, and pursues Bimala without reservation. Flattered by Sandip's attention, Bimala begins to question the nature of her marriage, and the three embark upon an emotional journey that will forever alter their lives, just as India begins a lengthy period of upheaval and unrest. Of the three, Sandip is transparantly shallow, while Nikhil thoughtfully considers every aspect before embarking on a course of action. Both men indulge in lengthy discourses, but the introduction by Anita Desai does much to frame this novel in the appropriate perspective. The allegorical nature of this tale is evident as the characters plunge headlong into the future.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By George Schaefer on October 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is largely a parable about the conflicts in Bengal in the early twentieth century. Tagore uses a triangle of husband and wife and outside suitor. Bimala, the wife is a sort of central figure as the novel largely revolves around her conflicting feelings towards both her husband Nikhil and Sandip. She feels excited by Sandip's passion but also has a bond with her husband. Nikhil is the reserved and dignified religious man who is not swayed by the mob mentality that was sweeping through the Bengal state. Sandip is the passionate, xenophobic leader pushing for the immediate gain. The narrative is written threefold. All three characters take turns telling the story from their own point of view. This is an interesting effect that adds dimension to the tale. Tagore obviously feels empathy towards Nikhil but he refrains from being too judgmental toward Sandip. Bimala becomes the most sympathetic character simply because she faces the most ambivalence in the book. There are many blatant political overtures in this book but I find that it works well as human drama as well. You needn't be knowledgeable about the conflicts in India to appreciate the moral dilemmas presented in this tale. Reading this book made it easy to understand why Tagore was awarded a Nobel Prize.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By "lucyvanpelt79" on January 12, 2000
Format: Paperback
Tagore is Bengali, and apparently, the Bengali style is a higly rhetorical, ornate one. Therefore, the dialogue can come off sounding stiff and unnatural, and requires some getting used to. Beyond the artifice of the language, however, the characterizations are the real strength of this book. The internal struggle of Bimala, between her noble husband, Nikhil, and the charismatic Sandip, is a beautiful parallel to the struggle the Indian people themselves have experienced, between righteous but non-violent indignation, and the frustration of an occupied land, feeding a desire for violent change. It is as this sort of parable that The Home and the World succeeds best.
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