Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Homeless Channel Paperback – June 5, 2007


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$37.76 $1.56
Comic
"Please retry"

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: AiT/PlanetLar (June 5, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 193205149X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932051490
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 6.1 x 8.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,012,667 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael Cassella on September 6, 2011
Format: Paperback
There's a term I use for shopping for DVDs, Books and Graphic Novels called "Blind Buy" meaning that I purchased the item with no research, foreknowledge, or other information outside of reading the plot synopsis and looking at the talent involved. A successful Blind Buy means that not only am I satisfied with my purchase but I want to search out the rest of the works by the people involved. The Homeless Channel was one of the most satisfying Blind Buys for me during the year of its release. Writer/artist Matt Silady shows that you don't need a full production team to try to make your project come to fruition. Silady uses a simple art style to create a commentary on not only the homeless issue in major cities in our society but also our obsession with the 24-hr access to information and content. He never gets preachy in his writing and also still manages to display a level of skill with dialogue not unlike Aaron Sorkin and his contemporaries.

For anyone that is interested in a different type of graphic novel, one about people and our daily lives and one that uses the medium to tell a story that wouldn't make it to being told as a movie or television show, this book is for you. If you work for a library, I highly suggest stocking it and if you teach a class on the media sciences build it into your curriculum.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nathan E. Milos on September 6, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This will be a biased review. It is biased because I know the author; I went to the same graduate school (though we were in different programs). It is also biased because I served as a visual reference for one of the characters (a handsome bearded homeless man); my wife also served as a visual reference (an attractive homeless woman) as did many of my friends. That said, Silady's choice to model his characters after real people lends an air of realism to the work. Because Silady chose to use real people as the homeless and the watchers of the homeless, it is easy to put ourselves in both positions and question our own complicity in the problems of poverty and reality tv. As such the satirical premise feels not at all fantastical or far-fetched, but more like an eventuality or at least a logical possibility. Silady examines America's love of the schadenfreude of reality television with compelling visuals. The contrast of the romantic love story and the hard scrabble lives of the homeless serves as a mirror to the lives of many Americans who are entertained by the failings of others on shows like Hoarders or Intervention, yet expect fairy tale romances for themselves. It captures the zeitgeist of a certain moment in the early 21st Century. It also has pictures of me in it, so you should buy it straight away and look at it longingly.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Russ Burlingame on September 6, 2011
Format: Paperback
Matt Silady's The Homeless Channel was one of the most celebrated graphic novels of 2007, drawing positive reviews from industry and mainstream press as well as award nominations and many columnists' year-end accolades. And it was for good reason--Silady's likable, believable characters and a compelling story coalesced with a lifelike art style and a cinematic storytelling method to create the feel of a smart, sometimes funny and always compelling movie happening on the page in front of you.

The Homeless ChannelThe Homeless Channel follows Darcy Shaw, an idealistic and motivated young television executive whose idea for a 24-hour television channel dedicated to reality programming centered around homeless people springs to life when she gets funding from Infinicorp, a big, anonymous corporation whose principal output is never revealed. It's not unlike Continental Corp, the fictional corporation that owned sports network CSC in the critically-acclaimed Aaron Sorkin TV comedy SportsNight. That's not an accident--when I first met Silady at this summer's Small Press Expo in Washington, DC, my Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip baseball cap caught his eye and he engaged me in conversation about Sorkin's work. Silady says of SportsNight, "When I watched that show, I found the characters to be wonderfully three-dimensional. At the same time, they tended to have an idealism that was very appealing to me in the midst of our hyper-cynical society. I tried my best to inject some of those same characteristics into the cast of The Homeless Channel."

Unlike SportsNight, though, the corporation that owns the network in The Homeless Channel isn't constantly interfering with the on-air content.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Andi Rae on September 2, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I purchased this book based upon a review by Tom Russo, published months ago in Entertainment Weekly, giving it an A- rating, and describing it in part as "For Fans of...Satire, played ramrod straight." Based upon this review, I decided to forego my usual criteria of previewing sample pages from the book on Amazon, since there were none available.

When the book arrived, I was surprised to find I'd purchased a paperback comic strip. I re-read Russo's review and found nothing specifically stating this was not a novel. Not being an aficionada of the comic strip venue, I would never have purchased this book had I realized this.

I am simply writing this review to forewarn others who may be intrigued by the story line, yet not realize it is told in comic strip format. In all fairness to the book, I can only hope that someone who appreciates the art of storytelling via comic strips will rise to the occasion and write a review that will be of value to that audience.

Just saying...
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search