The Homework Trap and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$12.98
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $1.97 (13%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $0.62
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Homework Trap: How to Save the Sanity of Parents, Students and Teachers Paperback – February 25, 2012


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.98
$11.44 $9.25

Frequently Bought Together

The Homework Trap: How to Save the Sanity of Parents, Students and Teachers + The Homework Myth: Why Our Kids Get Too Much of a Bad Thing + Rethinking Homework: Best Practices That Support Diverse Needs
Price for all three: $44.40

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 113 pages
  • Publisher: Wyndmoor Press (February 25, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 061557680X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615576800
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 5.2 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,179,928 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Kenneth Goldberg is a clinical psychologist with more than thirty years of professional experience in dealing with many different psychological issues, in both in-patient and out-patient settings. Through his career, he has served children, adolescents, and adults, offering individual and group psychotherapy, as well as marriage and family counseling. Prior to starting his private practice, Dr. Goldberg served as clinical director for a children's residential treatment facility, as director of a psychiatric day-treatment program for the chronically mentally ill, and as the head of a rural mental-health center. He has been a frequent speaker and consultant on programs designed to serve psychiatric populations. His first book, Differing Approaches for Partial Hospitalization, was an edited volume comparing treatment modalities in community-based programs for people who are chronically mentally ill. A member of the American Psychological Association, Dr. Goldberg currently conducts psychological evaluations for disabled workers and for those accused by the state of harming their children. Dr. Goldberg’s interest in persistent homework problems was stimulated not just by his personal experience and his work with children, but through studies conducted with disabled adults. Unlike those who work primarily with children, Dr. Goldberg understands the long-term effects that chronic homework problems have on people later in life, as adults and in their roles as parents. Prior to becoming a psychologist, Dr. Goldberg was a mathematician. He attended Columbia University on a National Science Foundation Scholarship and as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow. He left Columbia with a master’s degree in math and went on to Long Island University, where he earned a PhD in clinical psychology. Dr. Goldberg brings his mathematical way of thinking to his clinical work, enabling him to see patterns of behavior in unique ways. Dr. Goldberg has dabbled with literary fiction and is the author of Peter Squared.. Dr. Goldberg’s next project, after completing his work on The Homework Trap, will be to publish Peter Cubed, the sequel to his first novel. Dr. Goldberg is the proud father of three adult children (all of whom have had different homework experiences) and is married to Maryka Matthews, a retired psychiatric social worker. In his free time, Dr. Goldberg enjoys tennis, chess and Scrabble™ (and although he does not feel trapped, he often does work at home). www.thehomeworkdoctor.com

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JB on September 20, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was disappointed in that this book gave advice & suggestions that we found impractical -- since there is no way teachers in regular schools (here in Asia) are going to institute radical changes to their homework policies without some kind of government intervention.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
insightful professional who is also a parent takes a simple and sane approach to homework that is surprisingly absent in most public school settings-
more parents, counselors and educators need to read this, and adjust accordingly so as not to lose the student.
An argument for true inclusion is here should educators want to take the dare to be different and truly inclusionary-
more parents need to read this book--so that less need to and this simple approach becomes a commonplace strategy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Pigglies on January 14, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
When I was a student, I was always the good student who did all the homework. Yes, homework frequently lasted forever (I was often awake until 0100 in middle school and high school), but I did it. My brother however, wouldn't do it, or if he did it, he wouldn't turn it in. I remember him being yelled at while I was still working, because he would sit and stare at the homework. Yet he scored very well on tests and ultimately ended up being able to learn some very complex stuff in college (computer programming). So this book provided some interesting insight for me. Even as someone who was not technically homework trapped, I would have certainly appreciated it if schools gave out less homework as well back when I was a student. It's bad when college actually seemed like a break!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search