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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Gay 12-Step Program, Minus Two
So, you're gay, think you're gay, or one of those "I'm just curious" types? Then does Judy Carter have the book for you! This book helps you to explore your inner feelings towards being gay and assists in knocking the door off that closet to open up to your inner homo. Using generous amounts of her gay stand-up humor, Carter makes her book entertaining as...
Published on October 24, 1997

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars Once relevant but now a museum piece
As a gay man living in Canada in 2012, The Homo Handbook: Getting in Touch with Your Inner Homo by Judy Carter from 1996 seems sorely dated. Human rights and social legislation for gays and lesbians have advanced at meteor speed in Canada since 1996, while Americans unbelievably have had to deal with homophobic propositions and referenda at election time. I received The...
Published 21 months ago by Craig Rowland


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Gay 12-Step Program, Minus Two, October 24, 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: The Homo Handbook: Getting in Touch with Your Inner Homo: A Survival Guide for Lesbians and Gay Men (1996 Lambda Literary Award Best Humor Book) (Paperback)
So, you're gay, think you're gay, or one of those "I'm just curious" types? Then does Judy Carter have the book for you! This book helps you to explore your inner feelings towards being gay and assists in knocking the door off that closet to open up to your inner homo. Using generous amounts of her gay stand-up humor, Carter makes her book entertaining as well as informing, allowing gays to laugh at themselves as well as the narrow-minded bigots who bash them. She also incorporates numerous workbook-style exercises designed to guide gays in accepting themselves and making the rest of the world accept them, too. This is a must-read for anyone who is gay, thinks he/she might be gay, or even knows someone who is gay.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Adds our cammp humor into the "coming out" process, November 9, 1999
This review is from: The Homo Handbook: Getting in Touch with Your Inner Homo: A Survival Guide for Lesbians and Gay Men (1996 Lambda Literary Award Best Humor Book) (Paperback)
As an endangered species (i.e. 'lesbian with a sense of humor'), I adored this book! Judy has her inner camp by the horns, making this an incredibly humorous read as she leads you through a well-rounded self-exploration of your "inner homo." Definitely worth both the money and the time to read this treasure!
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent if you fit a certain type, May 26, 2000
By A Customer
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This review is from: The Homo Handbook: Getting in Touch with Your Inner Homo: A Survival Guide for Lesbians and Gay Men (1996 Lambda Literary Award Best Humor Book) (Paperback)
This book is great. It has a lot of great exercises and advice, and is very supportive. I did find that this book has been written for a narrow audience, a white closeted lesbian in her 30's. This is an audience that I just don't fit into. This book does try to address other audiences such as gay men, but does not handle it well. For those of you who fit into this book's audience, BUY IT! It's a great book. If you don't fit into this audience, you can buy it but might find that you can't relate to it as well.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars stepping out in style, September 17, 2006
This review is from: The Homo Handbook: Getting in Touch with Your Inner Homo: A Survival Guide for Lesbians and Gay Men (1996 Lambda Literary Award Best Humor Book) (Paperback)
I've owned this book for ten years and I know that there are many good reasons to buy and enjoy the "Homo Handbook" - regardless of whether you're prepared to follow the gradual steps suggested or prefer to quickly come out to your folks and flatmates by just leaving it on the coffee table.

Judy Carter has been a stand-up comic performer and lecturer by trade, so she knows what works in hunour and entertainment. She is proudly lesbian, but writes in a manner which is also very gay male relevant, and that's because she did extensive online research in gay men's chatrooms, especially for this publication.

You'll find plenty of sound advice - including encouragement to keep a journal of your progression toward self-acceptance and public disclosure as well as getting some real-life honest-to-god romantic action happening in your life.

The many Gerard Donelan cartoons are a wonderful added bonus and are the reason I often pick the book up and flick through it.

The best book, by far, for a young queer person to own and read would be "The Survival Guide" by XY Magazine, but for more mature readers "The Homo Handbook" is likely to be a very positive and useful resource.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Pretty Darn Dated, December 30, 2013
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This review is from: The Homo Handbook: Getting in Touch with Your Inner Homo: A Survival Guide for Lesbians and Gay Men (1996 Lambda Literary Award Best Humor Book) (Paperback)
I first bought this book about 15 years ago. At the time, I was a kid trying to figure out my identity, and I found myself drawn to a whole culture I really didn't know anything about (sucks growing up out in the boonies, especially when you're "different"). This book was great: a fun, never-heavy-handed introduction to gay culture (of the late 1990's, anyway). It clarified a lot of vocabulary for me that made it easier for me to navigate the world I was finding myself in, and made me feel a lot more normal. Its humorous style was exactly what I needed to help me figure things out, without making things scarier than they already were.

Now, this book is more of a novelty than anything. It's pretty outdated, as the world has changed a lot in the nearly 20 years since it was published. It's not totally useless for people exploring their sexuality now, but it's more likely to appeal to people who were stepping out of the closet in the 1990's and want to look back, than to kids and adults in the same position now. Regardless, it's a great book and lots of fun to read, and certainly a hilarious coffee table book, if you aren't too self-conscious about the title.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, July 27, 2013
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This was very interesting. Judy Carter did a nice job bringing all the elements together. I would recommend this book.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Once relevant but now a museum piece, October 29, 2012
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As a gay man living in Canada in 2012, The Homo Handbook: Getting in Touch with Your Inner Homo by Judy Carter from 1996 seems sorely dated. Human rights and social legislation for gays and lesbians have advanced at meteor speed in Canada since 1996, while Americans unbelievably have had to deal with homophobic propositions and referenda at election time. I received The Homo Handbook as a Christmas gift from a colleague at work sixteen years ago. While I flipped through it and enjoyed its plentiful cartoons, I did not read it cover to cover until now.

Carter is a lesbian comedian and at times her handbook is a riot to read. Most often the humour comes from playing with gay and lesbian stereotypes. I can laugh at myself even if I am not a flannel-wearing lesbian. Carter writes chapters on coming out to oneself, one's friends, one's parents, at work, and even chapters on how to get laid and how to become a gay activist. If I was at a point in my life where I was closeted and not even out to myself, I might have found this book valuable. However its structure seems far too new-age for my liking. The reader is often instructed to remember events from one's past, to meditate and breathe deeply in order to regress, and to write down spontaneously one's feelings in a coming-out diary. One is instructed to do a lot of note-taking while reading this book. I get the feeling that if one were to engage in every writing exercise during the process of reading this book, it would take a good two weeks--seriously--to accomplish all that Carter wants you to do:

"Imagine that you're getting married. Go into detail--the outfit, the music, the strippers. Write for five minutes. How does that make you feel? Does it scare you? If so, why?"

and

"Make a list in your coming-out journal of what you are letting go of by coming out. Now write down the ways your parents made (make) you 'wrong.'"

Carter believes in making lemonade out of lemons and finds internal strength even when dealing with homophobia or "toxic" friends. I didn't find some of her advice on what to do if you come out at work and get fired very helpful:

"If you are fired for being gay, your coming out can wake up the world if you file a sexual-orientation-discrimination lawsuit."

This is fine if you have the time, money and strength to file and go through with legal action. If you're living paycheque-to-paycheque, Carter's remark that if you've lost your job, would you really want to be working for bigots anyway, seems little consolation. I am indeed fortunate to work where I do in a gay-positive place, and in Canada at that, where losing one's job because of one's sexual orientation is not a worry.

Perhaps groundbreaking--and relevant--when it was written in 1996, The Homo Handbook is now a nostalgia piece that belongs in the lesbian and gay archives.
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