Hospitality-The Sacred Art: Discovering the Hidden Spirit... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.99
  • Save: $1.00 (6%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 14 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by SNUBS2011
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: A typical used book in Very Good condition. We carefully inspected this book and shows only slight use. Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 customer service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Hospitality - The Sacred Art: Discovering the Hidden Spiritual Power of Invitation and Welcome (The Art of Spiritual Living) Paperback – November 1, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-1594732287 ISBN-10: 1594732280 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $15.99
9 New from $15.97 28 Used from $0.15
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.99
$15.97 $0.15
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

The Hospitality - The Sacred Art: Discovering the Hidden Spiritual Power of Invitation and Welcome (The Art of Spiritual Living) + Radical Hospitality: Benedict's Way of Love: Benedict's Way of Love, 2nd Edition + Making Room: Recovering Hospitality as a Christian Tradition
Price for all three: $46.14

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New and Popular Cookbooks for Fall
Get inspired with new and popular cookbooks and other food-related titles in Fall into Cooking.

Product Details

  • Series: The Art of Spiritual Living
  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: SkyLight Paths; 1 edition (November 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594732280
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594732287
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #216,879 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In the insightful latest installment of the Art of Spiritual Living series, Presbyterian pastor Sawyer suggests that practicing hospitality can be transformative. Sawyer's notion of her subject is capacious: though she writes about extending hospitality to grandparents, neighbors and friends, she is also interested in hospitable relationships with God, oneself and even with creation. Ultimately, she calls for readers to do more than simply have people over for a meal (though sharing food is one hospitable practice she encourages); rather, she wants people to invite others into deep, real relationships. Thus, intentionality and attentiveness underpin her conception of hospitality. We should pay attention to what is really going on inside of us and listen carefully when in conversation with other people. Sawyer moves from the theoretical and theological (hospitality to God is circular… because when we welcome God we find that we ourselves are deeply welcomed into God) to the practical (centering prayer can foster a hospitable relationship with God; making museum or picnic dates with yourself is a way to practice hospitality to self). She writes with a deeply ecumenical bent, drawing on Thich Nhat Hahn, Swami Anantananda, Gandhi and Lao Tsu. This small book will be a blessing to many people. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Rev. Nanette Sawyer is founding pastor of Wicker Park Grace, an innovative Christian community in Chicago that holds hospitality as a core value. An ordained minister with the Presbyterian Church (USA), she serves as a representative on the Interfaith Relations Commission of the National Council of Churches USA.



Rev. Dirk Ficca is the executive director of the Council for a Parliament of the World's Religions, an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA), and moderator of Chicago Presbytery’s Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Richard Stomper on February 24, 2008
Format: Paperback
Reverend Sawyer presents her theme of hospitality in a way which is generally unfamiliar to us in the modern context. She reaches back in time to the great ancient spiritual traditions for her understanding. In the Christian tradition we can talk of the Rule of St. Benedict and the tradition of hospitality in the medieval monasteries. Her presentation however extends beyond Christianity and she is able to show that similar traditions are virtually universal. In developing her theme of hospitality as mutual receptivity, reverence, and generosity she is able to achieve a true synthesis of both breadth and depth while showing its relevance for the modern world.
I especially appreciate her integration of the non-violent philosophies (or theologies?) of Gandhi and Martin Luther King. Actually the roots of this type of thinking are deeper in Christianity than most people realize. Groups like the Anabaptists, Quakers, and even the Jehovah's Witnesses, are often just considered eccentric by mainstream Christians, but there is true depth to their theology and a greater affinity to biblical thought then is generally recognized. Non-violent theology goes back a long way. In the case of the Anabaptists, it dates to the days of the Reformation. Threads go back to the earliest days of Christianity. Baha'is form another tradition which comes to very similar theological conclusions. Their origins are primarily in Shiite Islam, from which they split in the nineteenth century, showing again the universality of the origins of these strains of thought.
It seems to me that Sawyer is quite correct in pointing to the fact that the great religious traditions converge on the question of hospitality. She has identified a very singular point in their respective theologies.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By David Crumm on March 28, 2008
Format: Paperback
You may be surprised as you start reading the Rev. Nanette Sawyer's book that you'll be more than a quarter of your way through the entire volume before Sawyer actually leads you toward meeting someone. For more than 50 pages, you'll be getting yourself spiritually ready for that moment. This book really is about what Sawyer calls "deep hospitality," a guide to some of the possible approaches we can take to open our hearts, minds and lives to other people.

Despite what our parents and grandparents may have drilled into us, hospitality is far larger than etiquette and cultural customs of welcoming people or visiting them. Hospitality is a timeless spiritual principle that flows to us from our earliest scriptures, although today we tend to trump the value of hospitality with other values like competition and the desire for self-expression. That's unfortunate, because those more popular values often wind up carving out dangerous divisions in our communities.

In his preface to the book, the Rev. Dirk Ficca, a well-known bridge builder himself through the Parliament of the World's Religions, explains the urgency of freshly exploring this kind of deep hospitality: "In a post-September 11 world, driven by the forces of globalization and religious identity, where communities of often starkly different languages, cultures, and traditions are now living side by side in major urban centers, the stakes have never been higher for a different reading of these traditions, with hospitality as the guiding principle."

Sawyer and Ficca both are from the Presbyterian Church USA, but Sawyer's book takes us far from mainline Protestantism in search of spiritual resources.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Meredith White on September 11, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is a fantastic read for individuals and groups seeking to expand their community, to encounter others with openness, and to celebrate the image of God in their self and others. Nanette includes wonderful stories and practical suggestions for each practice she explores. She draws from many faith traditions to teach hospitality as a global sacred spiritual practice.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book makes several good arguments and draws from all kinds of sources. Sadly, the author takes much too long to reach her point, and pads out her explications with excessive spiritual buzzwords.
It bogs down about halfway. I usually soldier through, but I wasn't able to finish this book.
Also, because overhead is so much lower, the electronic version of this book should cost a lot less than a paper version. By charging the same price for both, the publisher reveals his fundamental greed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images