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The Hottest Boy Who Ever Lived Paperback – April 1, 2000


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Paperback, April 1, 2000
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 6 and up
  • Grade Level: 1 and up
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Allen & Unwin Pty., Limited (Australia) (April 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1865080934
  • ISBN-13: 978-1865080932
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 8.1 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,716,125 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 3?This odd Australian import is about Hector, a red-headed boy spawned by a volcano, whose only friend is Minton the salamander?no one else can stand the heat he projects. After a great storm floods their home on the edge of the world, they wind up floating adrift at sea and are finally rescued by a Viking adventurer. Gilda enjoys Hector's warmth, and takes him home with her, but the other villagers are suspicious and frightened of the stranger. When Hector literally thaws out a frozen child and his usefulness in a cold climate is made evident (he can heat bath water or sauna rocks with a touch), he is at last accepted, but it is Gilda who buys a sled and pony and starts "Hector's Heating and Hot Water Service," making a wonderful new life for herself, the boy, and his salamander. The lengthy text has no pep and the cartoon illustrations are static?the colors are muted, except for Hector's wild red hair. If there is any real humor here, few children are likely to find it.?Rosanne Cerny, Queens Borough Public Library, NY
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Anna Fienberg and Kim Gamble have previously collaborated on more than 20 children's books, including the Minton Goes! series and the Tashi series.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 20, 1999
Format: Library Binding
Poor Hector! He's so lonely, but finds a friend in the end. My preschoolers in my class ask to read this story over and over, they love it! It's a nice story and addresses tolerance of differences and friendship.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. Karin L. Taylor on December 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a book about just how life really is, hard. I just loved it, as did my children. We are Australian by the way, and so is the author and illustrator.

I think it's a great story to read to our children, who can make connections through relating the story to incidents in their own lives..and we as adults can help to guide them through the more difficult aspects by being open and honest in our communication.

We cannot deny that all of our children, regardless of where you come from, will have to someday learn about different things ranging from life through to death, from bullying and alienation, to acceptance and understanding, and there are lots of people who think because we are different there is no hope for us......these issues all crop up in the book. It is especially good for a child who does display a different way of doing things and may be getting bullied at school. It shows that the first judgement people make about you is not always correct, it asks us to show tolerance to our fellow man, and give them time and space to reveal themselves....it asks as to be gentle with one another and look for the good things, and not to judge people from a fearful stance if they look a bit scary....sure they might have unusual ideas, but their difference is what makes the world interesting, better, and it helps us to grow.

This was the best children's book I've ever read. It takes a child to a place in their imagination, too often missing now in the lives of children, who are required by some to live as an adult. What they are learning is to let go of 'learning' for a moment and dwell in a creative space, allowing the ideas that are fairly emotional ones, to seep in.
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By Amazon Customer on February 21, 2011
Format: Paperback
This was a great story with a few lessons in humanity along the way. We read books every night at storytime, and this story had our family of four captivated. Great to find it here on Amazon, as I'm getting ready to buy a couple of copies for friends.
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