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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A nonstop page turner!
When I began the book, I thought it would be slow going because it was written about 100 years ago. I was SO wrong! I finished the book in a period of less than 24 hours!!! This is an absolutely fabulous book! Doyle's use of language is masterful, and you are swept away to the moor with its swamps, jagged cliffs, and massive hills. I can honestly say I was quite spooked...
Published on August 17, 2005 by Matthew French

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42 of 50 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Missing parts
I concur with previous reviews. Unacceptable copy as it is mising passages - as mentioned before - which creates the most confusion from the very start. Should be removed from the Amazon catalog as it is unbecoming of this vendor. SAVE YOUR TIME. DO NOT DOWNLOAD IT.
Published on February 28, 2010 by C. Gonzalez


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42 of 50 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Missing parts, February 28, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I concur with previous reviews. Unacceptable copy as it is mising passages - as mentioned before - which creates the most confusion from the very start. Should be removed from the Amazon catalog as it is unbecoming of this vendor. SAVE YOUR TIME. DO NOT DOWNLOAD IT.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A nonstop page turner!, August 17, 2005
When I began the book, I thought it would be slow going because it was written about 100 years ago. I was SO wrong! I finished the book in a period of less than 24 hours!!! This is an absolutely fabulous book! Doyle's use of language is masterful, and you are swept away to the moor with its swamps, jagged cliffs, and massive hills. I can honestly say I was quite spooked as I was reading some of it at night!

Since this is the first novel I have ever read by Doyle, I didn't know what to expect. But the twists in the plot and the constant itching to know what was going to happen next had me hooked!

I watched the 1959 movie after reading this, and I have to say it was a disgrace. I don't know if I would be happy seeing any of the versions, only because I don't know if any of them could even compare to the rich world and language used by Doyle to transport you to Devonshire!! But of course, the book is always better than the movie. :)
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "A devilish affair", January 29, 2006
By 
Paul Weiss (Dundas, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
When Henry Baskerville, the last remaining scion of the family, travels from Canada to England to take up residence in Baskerville Hall after the puzzling violent death of his uncle, Sir Charles, he is immediately greeted with a string of baffling mysteries not the least of which is the legend of an enormous hound residing on the moors in Devon. Dr James Mortimer, family friend to the Baskervilles, engages Holmes and Watson to advise and protect Henry and to resolve the issue of the hound's existence once and for all. Not one to believe in supernatural phantoms such as this spectral hound from hell endowed with "blazing eyes and dripping jaws", Holmes dispatches Watson to scout out the terrain and place the neighbouring residents under the proverbial magnifying glass - Stapleton, the accomplished entomologist and his beautiful sister, Beryl, who attempts to warn off Henry from taking up residence in the hall; Frankland, a crotchety busybody with a telescope and his troubled daughter, Laura Lyons, recovering from an ill-advised marriage; and the Barrymores, long time butler and housekeeper to the Baskerville family, who are clearly carrying a disturbing secret of their own.

True to the well-established paradigm of the Holmes canon, Doyle allows Watson to tell the tale with a deliciously full serving of speculation, theorizing based on "incomplete data", emotion, gentlemanly bravado, flowery Victorian atmosphere, elegant dialogue, and extensive detail on the routine of daily living at the turn of the century such as communicating by telegram and traveling by coach. His development of the bleak, dark, gloomy atmosphere of the moor is masterful:

"Over the green squares of the fields and the low curve of a wood there rose in the distance a grey, melancholy hill, with a strange jagged summit, dim and vague in the distance, like some fantastic landscape in a dream."

An easy one evening read over the comfortable space of a couple of hours, The Hound of the Baskervilles moves swiftly from the traditional cozy opening of Holmes' Baker Street digs to a resounding climax that is packed with more excitement and action than almost any other story in the entire Holmes litany. Two thumbs up and a five star recommendation to readers of all ages!

Paul Weiss
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20 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Awesome book!, January 19, 2006
A Kid's Review
The Baskerville family had a myth that haunted them for ages. When it finally comes true, Mr. Sherlock Holmes must come to the rescue. The Baskerville myth of a dog that kills all descendants of the Baskervilles at night on the moor has haunted the family for ages. So, when Sir Charles Baskerville is found dead on the moor, everyone assumes it was the hound. Sir Henry, who is Sir Charles' nephew, comes and inherits the estate with Holmes closely watching. Sir Henry meets the Stapletons, a young couple that are his closest neighbors, and begins to fall in love with Ms. Stapleton. Holmes puts Sir Henry's life at stake at the end of the book, and they catch the culprit in the act. This book is an excellent read that would be the perfect story to read when you can't decide between a mystery and an adventure.

This book is an example of how much Sherlock Holmes cares about other people's feelings. When Holmes sent Watson with Sir Henry to inherit the estate , he didn't tell Watson that he would follow to make sure everything was OK, which made Watson feel betrayed and not trusted. Holmes also told Watson that Cartwright had supplied all of his needs for him, which made Watson even more upset. At the end of this story, Holmes puts Sir Henry's life on the line when he lets the hound jump on Sir Henry before he kills it, petrifying Sir Henry with fear.

The antagonist is really good at disguising himself in this book. He outsmarts Sherlock Holmes in London with a full black beard, and calling himself Sherlock Homes. The Antagonist also befriends the Baskervilles so that they would never suspect him as the culprit. His plans are very smart, from bribing Sir Charles out of his house to attempting to kill Sir Henry the way back from a friendly dinner.

This book has many adventures. Sir Henry and Dr. Mortiemier get dogged in London, Watson and Sir Henry chase an escaped convict, and Sir Henry almost gets eaten by a huge hound.

This is the perfect book for any day. It is suspensful, exiting, and it puts you on the edge of your seat. This book deserves a five star rating!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Where it all began, January 7, 2013
Part I

The Storyline
This being the first story in the Sherlock Holmes series, this is also the introduction of the two main characters: Holmes and Watson. After meeting one another they agree to move in together as they were both in need of a roommate. Shortly after, a man is discovered as being murdered and Sherlock Holmes is asked to evaluate the scene to determine if there is any evidence of who may have done it. The only clue is a woman's wedding ring and the words "RACHE" written in blood on the wall.

My Thoughts
Okay so... I think I have a bit of a crush. I loved Sherlock eccentricity and how unconventional he was. I will admit, the mystery wasn't really much of a mystery but it was still entertaining nonetheless. It did get a big "oooohhhhhhhhh...." from me once the mystery was finally solved though. Silly me, probably should have seen that one coming.

`There is no mystery about it at all. I am simply applying to ordinary life a few of those precepts of observation and deduction which I advocated in that article. Is there anything else that puzzles you?'

Part II
So, umm... I thought I missed something. The second half of this book was almost like a different book entirely and all of a sudden I'm right smack dab in the middle of Utah and everyone has buckets o' wives?

Anyways. Essentially, the second half of this book was a major bash-fest on the Mormons. I figure that's why it ended up on the banned book list.

"We have come," continued Stangerson, "at the advice of our fathers to solicit the hand of your daughter for whichever of us may seem good to you and to her. As I have but four wives and Brother Drebber here has seven, it appears to me that my claim is the stronger one."

Uh-huh. Five is definitely better than eight.

Overall, pretty enjoyable, would definitely be interested in reading more about Sherlock most definitely.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Poor formatting ruins this book, October 6, 2011
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I purchased this book to read on iPad Kndle and knew I was taking a small risk because there were no reviews. As it turns out, the risk was much larger: the book is unreadable because all the text is centered. I can't imagine why anyone would think centered text is appropriate in a book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good introduction to a great character, February 6, 2005
Meet Sherlock Holmes. Hopelessly eccentric, devastatingly brilliant, and seemingly born of a supernatural ability to accomplish what he sets his mind to, the world's greatest detective has devoted himself to the pursuit of criminals. By matching wits with both the criminals he hunts and the official police inspectors, Holmes has found a pasttime that has a neverending series of puzzles on which he can train his amazing powers of observation and deduction.

We're all familiar with this character, and that's because, a hundred years after Holmes was first unveiled to the public, he continues to gather new readers. An icon who has spawned dozens of stereotypes, Holmes has a universal appeal that still fascinates us, even though the world of crimefighting has transformed itself entirely.

For the modern reader, the writing is stiff and takes some getting used to. Watson's buffoonish amazement at every word Holmes utters is comical, and the pronouncements of the great detective seem arrogant and, at times, obvious or self-serving. But make no mistake. There's some magic in these writings.

This particular edition (I have the 1975 printing) is a very nice introduction to Holmes, beginning as it does with the first two stories which made the character famous. Young readers in particular should enjoy the immersion in Victorian England, and the exposure to this great character's methods. Highly recommended.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Hound of the Baskervilles, March 23, 2011
This edition is missing THE main plot of the story. Every time there is a letter or a newspaper article that is read (which anyone who reads Sherlock Holmes knows is a common device), it is skipped in the text entirely. This isn't even a good deal for free!
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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Holmes Meets Watson!, July 23, 2000
By 
This is where it all began, the very first Sherlock Holmes story. If you want to read all 60 Holmes adventures in chronological order (as you should) then by all means make this the first Holmes book that you ever read. They are all literary masterpieces, and this was the first one! Out of the 4 Holmes novels, I would rank this third, behind the Valley of Fear and the Hound of the Baskervilles. I will spare you the plot details, you can do that elsewhere. Just get and read this book and it will start you on a fascinating and extremely entertaining journey through Conan Doyle's world of Sherlock Holmes, one of the most widely recognized, and best, figures in all of literature.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Don't bother downloading this copy, December 9, 2009
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Verified Purchase(What's this?)
As mentioned by the previous reviewer, this version is missing quite a bit of key content. Whether it's a formatting issue with the Kindle or the transcriber forgot to include the passages is unclear. But the story is unreadable without the missing text.
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The Hound of the Baskervilles (Penguin Classics)
The Hound of the Baskervilles (Penguin Classics) by Arthur Conan Doyle (Hardcover - September 28, 2010)
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