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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on August 17, 2005
Format: Paperback
When I began the book, I thought it would be slow going because it was written about 100 years ago. I was SO wrong! I finished the book in a period of less than 24 hours!!! This is an absolutely fabulous book! Doyle's use of language is masterful, and you are swept away to the moor with its swamps, jagged cliffs, and massive hills. I can honestly say I was quite spooked as I was reading some of it at night!

Since this is the first novel I have ever read by Doyle, I didn't know what to expect. But the twists in the plot and the constant itching to know what was going to happen next had me hooked!

I watched the 1959 movie after reading this, and I have to say it was a disgrace. I don't know if I would be happy seeing any of the versions, only because I don't know if any of them could even compare to the rich world and language used by Doyle to transport you to Devonshire!! But of course, the book is always better than the movie. :)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on August 19, 2002
Format: Paperback
When I was a kid I used to read about a detective named Encyclopedia Brown. In these stories you were entertained with an action filled plot and given critical bits of info about each case, and the fun part was figuring out who the villian was. Very fun and very challenging books. Well when I happened upon Mr. Sherlock and his demonic hound case I found a glorified version of young enclyopedia set in 19th Century London...and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The story offers suspense and mystery, and challenges you to beat Sherlock to the solution. It challenged me enough that I went out and bought the complete set of Holmes' Stories...and I am gonna figure at least one of them out.
I deducted a star simply because I read it in between books like 'Grapes of Wrath', 'Catcher in the Rye', and '1984' which must, necessarily, be rated higher. But none-the-less, I think you will be thoroughly entertained and challenged by what you read!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 11, 2007
Format: Paperback
I have read and enjoyed many a good Sherlock Holmes story (e.g. "The Red-Headed League" is a winner), but at the very top of the book stack I would place "The Hound of the Baskervilles". Who could ever forget the atmosphere that Arthur Conan Doyle evokes by his use of those misty moors!

In teaching English (Literature) to a class of 7th & 8th grade boys, I was at first a bit hesitant to introduce this novel as our text. Would a group of squirrelly junior high boys find anything of interest in a book written in 1901? Answer: I needn't have worried. They loved it (and so did I)! The fog from the moors drifted right into our classroom.

First-rate mystery tale with one of the most famous fictional characters ever created. ENJOY! (But keep an eye out for a frightful luminescent hound next time you're walking home at night - just in case).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
An absolute classic which includes some of the more memorable characters and setting in any murder mystery. This book focusses more on eloquent Watson, which is a good choice since he is the character readers can relate to. Conversely, Holmes' extraordinary deductive reasoning powers make him the "superhero" of the story at just the right times. The setting of the "Grimpen Mire" is perfect for a murder mystery: ancient hut relics, deadly bogs, and even an escaped murderer.

My only complaint is that there is not much suspense when it comes to the ending, since Holmes of course is always a step ahead and he clues the reader in perhaps earlier than necessary. But overall this is a wonderful story and clearly a very influencial work.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on January 8, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Part I

The Storyline
This being the first story in the Sherlock Holmes series, this is also the introduction of the two main characters: Holmes and Watson. After meeting one another they agree to move in together as they were both in need of a roommate. Shortly after, a man is discovered as being murdered and Sherlock Holmes is asked to evaluate the scene to determine if there is any evidence of who may have done it. The only clue is a woman's wedding ring and the words "RACHE" written in blood on the wall.

My Thoughts
Okay so... I think I have a bit of a crush. I loved Sherlock eccentricity and how unconventional he was. I will admit, the mystery wasn't really much of a mystery but it was still entertaining nonetheless. It did get a big "oooohhhhhhhhh...." from me once the mystery was finally solved though. Silly me, probably should have seen that one coming.

`There is no mystery about it at all. I am simply applying to ordinary life a few of those precepts of observation and deduction which I advocated in that article. Is there anything else that puzzles you?'

Part II
So, umm... I thought I missed something. The second half of this book was almost like a different book entirely and all of a sudden I'm right smack dab in the middle of Utah and everyone has buckets o' wives?

Anyways. Essentially, the second half of this book was a major bash-fest on the Mormons. I figure that's why it ended up on the banned book list.

"We have come," continued Stangerson, "at the advice of our fathers to solicit the hand of your daughter for whichever of us may seem good to you and to her. As I have but four wives and Brother Drebber here has seven, it appears to me that my claim is the stronger one."

Uh-huh. Five is definitely better than eight.

Overall, pretty enjoyable, would definitely be interested in reading more about Sherlock most definitely.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on May 24, 2009
Format: Paperback
Read: 5/09, 7/10, 6/12
Rate: 5/5

5/09: The authentic stories of the famed Sherlock Holmes are among my favorite reads, and I enjoy the adventures thoroughly. Once on my travels to London, I did visit the fictional house of Sherlock Holmes situated at 221B Baker Street. It was a surreal experience, that's for sure...because it is a fictional home of a fictional character, for goodness sake! Still to this day, I am not sure what the B part signifies: a half house or the upstairs portion? Anyway back to the story, A Study in Scarlet is the very beginning of the famous character Sherlock Holmes and his oft neglected (and still famous) sidekick Dr. John Watson. We can thank our lucky stars to Stamford for introducing both to each other before settling their claims on 221B Baker Street. From there, it begins the many adventures that have encompassed the very foundation of sleuthing and solving crimes. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle introduced many of the concepts that were truly novel back and are now commonplace today among law enforcement, most notably the FBI. I find the introduction and the explanation of the techniques used by Sherlock Holmes interesting because I wondered how prevalent and how new they were at that time. Or perhaps I wondered if they were first conceived by the author in the novel, or were they just portrayed as fads at first (similar to science fiction books)? The writing by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is very beautiful and makes A Study in Scarlet a thoroughly pleasurable read, and there is a ton of wisdom contained within the lines and especially from the dialogues of Sherlock Holmes. In the collection of quotes by Sherlock Holmes, I have in A Study in Scarlet two favorites. One is when he says, "I consider that a man's brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. etc. etc." He is absolutely correct in this manner because Sherlock Holmes is very self-conscious about his knowledge being pure and away from distortions, so he can maintain a sound foundation. Another is "If I show you too much of my method of working, you will come to the conclusion that I am a very ordinary individual after all." Well, that's an interesting way of putting things. It's a bit of a complaint of mine because when I am reading the details of how Sherlock goes his business (for example, walking along the path, checking the strides, measuring the lengths, etc.) Sir Arthur Conan Doyle frequently omits the details that would allow me to make conjectures of how the crime could happen. So, what happens instead is that Sherlock Holmes will explain away the conclusions and how he arrived at them, and we, as the readers, don't get a first-hand chance to observe the actualities of the details. Anyhow, I am not going to say that it is a disappointing part of the tales, but rather it's just a pitiful block of the reader's thorough experience. In A Study in Scarlet, you will automatically, as I did, be stumped when you start reading the second part as the tale surrounds the Alkali Plain and begin to wonder if the publisher had somehow misplaced the part. Be rest assured, the tale will eventually explain the entire criminal acts that transpired in the first part of the tale. A very interesting question will appear: what if Jefferson Hope did not have an aortic aneurism, would he have been waived from his crimes because of the surrounding circumstances? Who knows? At the end of A Study in Scarlet, "Populus me sibilat, at mihi plaudo. Ipse domi simul ac nummos contemplar in arca." means "The public hisses at me, but I applaud myself in my own house, and simultaneously contemplate the money in my chest." All in all, if you want to have a totally satisfying experience of reading, you can't go wrong with A Study in Scarlet as well as the other authentic Sherlock Holmes stories.

7/10: Stamford takes the responsibility for initiating the wonderful collaboration of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson. The latter becomes a wonderful chronicler of Holmes' adventures, and the mystery surrounding every cases is always mysterious and interesting at same time. The logic that Holmes applies to his methods and chains of reasoning are incredibly simple yet complex. Notice that in the beginning of A Study in Scarlet Dr. Watson is struck in the shoulder by a Jezail bullet and then the location of the wound is changed to the leg in the beginning of The Sign of Four. Somewhere in the pages, following Dr. Watson's listing of Holmes' knowledge, I must say that I am very surprised that there was a test of his knowledge in mathematics. He would have made himself among the best of the best mathematicians. I've read somewhere also that Sherlock Holmes would have been a grand champion in chess. To start off the pleasure of reading Sherlock Holmes stories is to start with A Study in Scarlet. I think the book is the only and last time that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle will evade from Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson by going to a far away place in the country of Utah. I had to look ahead to make sure that the pages weren't put in there by a mistake. All in all, A Study in Scarlet is a thrilling beginning of the world most famous detective, Sherlock Holmes.

6/12: The very first Sherlock Holmes story, A Study in Scarlet is the beginning of the masterpiece of a character in the series what we consider the finest detective stories ever penned. If you read the certain lines such as "I consider that a man's brain originally is like a little empty attic...," "No data yet. It is a capital mistake to theorize before you have all the evidence. It biases the judgment." and "If I show you too much of my method of working, you will come to the conclusion that I am a very ordinary individual after all." you will wonder why he won't be a mathematician, for a chance to be in the same breath as Archimedes, Euclid, Gauss, and Euler. My only criticism of the story is how random the second part appears in the middle of it after the capture of the eluded criminal. It's like reading two separate books in one. However, the real story was actually well penned and interesting. So, what if Hope was in a perfect health? Would there have been a change in feeling of prosecuting the man? Who knows?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 16, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The setting is the star of Arthur Conan Doyle's atmospheric "The Hound of the Baskervilles," his most popular Sherlock Holmes story. With its barren fog-shrouded wastes, Neolithic ruins, and the treacherous Grimpen Mire, the bleak moor Doyle describes in such delicious detail is the ideal background for a creepy Gothic mystery. Does a cursed hellhound stalk the last heir to the Baskerville fortune? Only Sherlock Holmes can answer that, but for a good portion of the novel Watson is left to investigate on his own. The absence of the hyper-rational detective allows the supernatural mystique of this puzzle to develop without distraction before the master detective steps in to dispel the mystery. This is an uncommonly fun read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on April 29, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As a young teenager, I found The Hound of the Baskervilles a thrilling adventure. In this tale, Sherlock Holmes and his trustworthy assistant, Watson, find themselves thrown into a mystery stretching back generations. A strange hound, linked to several deaths, has stalked the Baskerville family for decades. This book engages the reader from start to finish through strong action and suspense .The characters are distinct and believable throughout. Friendship, loyalty and perseverance develop as major themes as the story unfolds. The PACES Study Guide gives the reader the tools for a much deeper understanding of the book. Any reader can easily find enjoyment in this tale.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on February 25, 2000
Format: Library Binding
The Hound of the Baskervilles, by Arthur Conan Doyle is a piquant mystery that leads you from suspicion to suspicion. Sir Charles Baskerville had recently died of exhaustion after running from the demonic Hound of the Baskervilles, the family curse. While going to claim his inheritance, Sir Henry, the last of the Baskervilles, is warned away from Baskerville Hall by an anonymous note. At any moment, Sir Henry's life might be put into peril by the beast or the culprit behind it, so Dr. Watson accompanies him to Baskerville Hall. Holmes must deduct who is behind these seemingly supernatural occurrences before the hound strikes again.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 24, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
This was a nice introduction to Sherlock and Watson. We learn how Watson and Sherlock meet and come to live together at 221B Baker Street, and it sets the scene for the rest of the books. The first half of this book deals with a mystery that Sherlock is trying to solve, and then the second half jumps back in time to provide a backstory for the victim and murderer, before leading up to the murder. I thought the mystery in this book was interesting, but it wasn't my favorite. I really loved the backstory in the second half, though, and I loved these early moments in Sherlock and Watson's friendship.
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