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The House Of Lanyon (Exmoor Saga) Hardcover – November 1, 2007


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Product Details

  • Series: Exmoor Saga
  • Hardcover: 592 pages
  • Publisher: Mira; First edition (November 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0778325024
  • ISBN-13: 978-0778325024
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,539,258 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The War of the Roses rages around the Lanyons in Exmoor, England, prosperous tenant farmers of the landed Sweetwater family. Peter Lanyon and his wife, Liza, bridle at his father Richard's attempts to run their lives as Richard, who hides a dark secret, tries to raise the family's station. Through war, intrigue and natural disaster, Peter and Liza love each other in their fashion, though each has a great lost love, and their mistakes come back to haunt them. As the Lanyons find favor with the Duke of Gloucester (who will be Richard III), it may be a case of being careful what you wish for. There's not enough historical detail to place the Lanyons in their time and place, and the book's pace is slow, but Anand, who writes the Ursula Blanchard mysteries as Fiona Buckley, has a light touch that carries this family saga. (Nov.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Born in London, Valerie Anand knew at the age of six that she wanted to be an author. At the age of fifteen she saw MGM's film Ivanhoe -- she walked into the cinema knowing that she wanted to be a novelist and walked out of it knowing that historical novels were the kind she most wanted to write.

Over the course of her long and distinguished writing career Valerie has written many works of historical fiction and is well-known for the Ursula Blanchard series of Elizabethan mysteries written under the pen name Fiona Buckley.

Still living in London, Valerie Anand is a frequent visitor to Exmoor, the setting featured in The House of Lanyon.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 9 customer reviews
Every twist and all too predictable plot turn in the story one could see coming a mile away.
Misfit
When you get to the Author's Note at the end of the book, things become much clearer, but not in a good sense.
David W. Straight
As well as the references to apprenticeships and guilds that also lent historical references.
JerseyGirl

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By P. K. Maynard on December 28, 2007
Format: Hardcover
As a long time, avid reader of historical fiction, I have to disagree with the reviewer who said that this novel doesn't provide a good "sense of time or place". Very clearly set during the Wars of the Roses and the aftermath of same, it's primary focus is on the everyday lives and tribulations of the common folk during those turbulent times. Although my favorites by this author continue to be her "Gildenford" triloy, I thoroughly enjoyed "The House of Lanyon". Unlike Follett, whose historical research in "Pillars of the Earth" leaves something to be desired, Anand's research is always impeccible.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Lovelace on October 13, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book took place in the fifteenth-century, The War of The Roses; arranged marriages; class systems; I thought the author did a great job telling of the lives of these people trying to make the best of what was expected of them. It was not how they wanted to love or live, but how they were expected to comply with the customs of that time in history. Four people in love, but none were allowed to marry who they wanted. It was not heavy with battle scenes, just enough to let you know how and why the wars were fought. Mostly about the people in three family's and the interaction between them, all starting because of a man's resentment to the class he was born into. I thought this was a very good book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sparkle girl on September 9, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you are looking for big battles and machinations of the royal court, this book doesn't have much of that.

What it does do, and do well, is to reflect the life of ordinary people caught up in extraordinary times. This author does this very well. I also recommend Nora Lofts, who is my favorite at this type of material.

First of all, I believe British authors are better at writing English history than the tudor wannabes we are getting these days. There is just a feel to the everyday life of an English yeoman family you get there you don't get with American authors of British history.

What is engaging about this story is that how the political fortunes of shifting alliances can allow a ordinary farmer to ascend upward.

That's why I disagree that it could be set in ANY time and place. Except for the time of Stephan and Maud (mother of Henry II) this was one the most disruptive period of English history of the middle ages. It might have been set in the English Civil war time, too, but I feel it needed the strong abrupt changes in fortune brought about by powerful benefics able to change a man's life, or give a yeoman famer several exposures to royal favor, on which the movement of the story turns.

I have now read this book twice and enjoyed it both times.

It is also the story of how a chance event can change several families history.

I enjoy a book that pretty much keeps to the language of its time and still is readable. I was reading a Tudor that was pretty good, but when they referred to Ann Boylen's "high profile at court" that just too modern a verbage for me. I prefer Norah Loft's language "thass as may be".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mikki Mac on April 17, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have read both books by this author in the Exmoor series, enjoyed both, good description of the time in which story takes place, look forward to more books like this from the author.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By JerseyGirl VINE VOICE on January 1, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I really enjoyed this historical saga of love, greed, ambition and lust in 1400 England. There was enough historical references to the wars to give it an historical flavor in my opinion. As well as the references to apprenticeships and guilds that also lent historical references. However, the story really grabbed me from the beginning with the family feuds and the story of the overbearing male Lanyons. However, I could not reconcile myself to Peter Lanyon never really continuing to claim Nicky as his son. I would have liked to see Peter claim Nicky as his son since he did raise him even if Nicky was not his "blood". I gave this a 5 star rating because I could not put it down until I saw everything come together at the conclusion.
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