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The House at Otowi Bridge: The Story of Edith Warner and Los Alamos Paperback – May 1, 1973


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The House at Otowi Bridge: The Story of Edith Warner and Los Alamos + Woman At Otowi Crossing
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 159 pages
  • Publisher: University of New Mexico Press; Trade edition (May 1, 1973)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0826302815
  • ISBN-13: 978-0826302816
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #101,641 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

The haunting experiences of a shy Pennsylvania woman who opened a tearoom in her adobe home that became a haven for neighboring nuclear scientists and Indians alike.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 29 customer reviews
It makes me feel very homesick.
RatherBeReading1000
Beautifully told by Peggy Pond Church, it is the story of Edith Warner and her life near Los Alamos during the thirties and forties.
Marjorie G. Martin
Peggy Pond Church does a lovely job retelling the story of Edith Warner and her time at Otowi Bridge.
Penn Smith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Marjorie G. Martin on January 1, 2001
Format: Paperback
This last weekend I delighted in this book left behind by a guest at my B&B. It is without a doubt one of the most joyful and inspiring books that I have read in a long time. Beautifully told by Peggy Pond Church, it is the story of Edith Warner and her life near Los Alamos during the thirties and forties. How she created a simple home from nothing and how it became a mecca for her neighbors the world famous physicists of Los Alanos and also the local Indians. They came to her house for dinner, to take a respite from their secluded work at the Lab and in coming to enjoy her good food came to enjoy her friendship and serentiy. She live in close proximity to the Indians of San Ildefonso, and also became their friend, loving them, their children, watching them grow and enjoy with them their ceremonies and rituals. It is a poetic book of simple life and a good one and the great beauty of northern New Mexico. We need more Edith Warners in this world
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Alan Blackstock on January 2, 2007
Format: Paperback
Notwithstanding the first reviewer's comments, as a former resident of Los Alamos, I find that Church's account comes far closer to the heart of the matter than does Frank Waters's treatment of the same subject, The Woman at Otowi Crossing.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Carla C. Kerr on October 7, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the story of a woman years ahead of her time. She is a pioneer, not in the sense of someone crossing the prairie in a schooner, but more because she dares to live her life as she desires. Edith exhibits extreme courage in making herself almost an Indian tribal member by showing her complete acceptance of the Pueblo Indians and their ways.

Edith Warner develops an astounding relationship with the scientists of Los Alamos as well as their wives gaining their trust and confidence. The little house where she lives is the freight delivery point for the people in Los Alamos and along with her pay for handling this, she also sells items such as tobacco and beer. She creates an atmosphere in her little house of safety and enjoyment. She becomes famous for her dinners cooked for the likes of Oppenheimer and Neils Bohr and their spouses. Edith had an Indian man helping her in the garden and around the house named Talano and it is rumored that he was also her lover. This was probably spiked by the fact that he slept in the little house although in his own room. This would be further proof of Edith being a woman well ahead of her time were it true.

This book is but one of the myriad of stories related to the Los Alamos project and the creation of the Atomic bomb and it gives one insight into the humanness of these men who carried the weight of the world on their shoulders while trying to development a way to end WWII as well as this amazing woman who did her part quietly and humbly. It is well written and I highly recommend it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Penn Smith on November 17, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Peggy Pond Church does a lovely job retelling the story of Edith Warner and her time at Otowi Bridge. I loved this story. A Philadelphia school teacher sent to the dessert to recuperate, only to return to her urban life and realize she can no longer live there. She returns to the dessert and makes her way in the simplest of ways: a garden and a tea shop. Her story become history when The Manhattan Project begins in Los Alamos and she, through her friendship with Robert Oppenheimer, begins serving meals to the scientists. Edith Warner, the woman who took the dessert to live simply, became a first hand witness to the changing of our world.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Susan P. Sihler on April 23, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great story and beautifully written! Wonderful back-drop to the development of Los Alamos and the mystical presence of a simple and tenacious woman who appreciated people, nature and the ALL.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By AmyL on February 28, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
interesting, beautifully written book about a woman in a unique and fascinating situation. Lovely descriptions of nature, the Native people of the area and their traditions, and the men and women working at Los Alamos.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ruth A. Simpson on February 2, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a wonderful book. This woman was very strong, smart, interesting, etc. Amazing account of hr life and the people she knew.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Westley R. Wright on February 1, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Presents not only a history of the early days of Los Alamos but builds a wonderful picture of the woman who understood the deeper aspects of the land and its indigenes people.
Well worth the read.
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