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The Hulk 2003 PG-13 CC

(989) IMDb 5.7/10
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Marvel Super Hero, the Hulk, explodes onto the screen in this special-effects epic starring Eric Bana and directed by Ang Lee.

Starring:
Eric Bana, Jennifer Connelly
Runtime:
2 hours, 19 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Science Fiction, Action
Director Ang Lee
Starring Eric Bana, Jennifer Connelly
Supporting actors Sam Elliott, Josh Lucas, Nick Nolte, Paul Kersey, Cara Buono, Todd Tesen, Kevin Rankin, Celia Weston, Mike Erwin, Lou Ferrigno, Stan Lee, Regi Davis, Craig Damon, Geoffrey Scott, Regina McKee Redwing, Daniel Dae Kim, Daniella Kuhn, Michael Kronenberg
Studio NBC Universal
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Andre Dursin on May 15, 2012
Format: Blu-ray
It's hard to imagine that there has been or ever will be a super-hero movie that divides as many viewers as Ang Lee's ambitious 2003 filming of THE HULK.

From the pre-release buzz about how Lee had taken a revisionist tact with the origin of the Stan Lee-Jack Kirby Marvel comic book hero, to the first, fleeting -- and unfinished -- glimpses of the all-CGI green one during the Super Bowl, the comics-to- movie community had been eagerly awaiting, and debating, the big-budget film. Early reactions ranged from utter disgust to complete and total admiration, which brings me to my thoughts on the film -- one which ended up being sent to the Marvel scrap heap in lieu of a 2008 movie that pretended (basically) this film never happened.

Before I dive into specifics, I can say that I was first appalled when I heard about the concept of Lee and James Schamus' version. Having grown up on the old Bill Bixby-Lou Ferrigno show, plus the various cartoon incarnations, the idea that Bruce Banner became the Hulk courtesy of his father's attempts to play God, to the mystery surrounding his mother's death, to the Hulk being able to leap tall buildings with a single bound -- all of them were pretty hard to swallow considering my youthful memories of the Incredible Hulk.

While what Lee and Schamus (along with credited co-writers Michael France and John Turman) have come up with is at times too dark for its own good, and is overly bogged down in psychological aspects that don't quite come off, THE HULK is still an ambitious, flawed, but always watchable combination of silly, colorful Marvel Comics action and a study of parents and children and what makes us all tick.

Sound like a jumbled mess? Well, it works better than you might have heard.
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63 of 83 people found the following review helpful By mljkb on November 16, 2003
Format: DVD
The "Hulk" is a good movie, often times great. The first half of the movie is a long, methodical character study of people under immense emotional torture, especially Bruce Banner (a pitch-perfect Eric Bana) and Betty Ross (Jennifer Connely). It is hinted that they share a dark past filled with absentee fathers and a secret military project that they might now be working on again, 30 years later. This first half or so is the reason why the "Hulk" was not well recieved among viewers and critics. People were expecting either another "Spiderman" or another "X-Men" or its sequel, filled with those films' brimming everyman qualities and light-pacing throughout, or the Hulk of the 70s t.v. show, who aided people when he had and anger spell. But director Ang Lee opted for a more tragic approach, with plenty of Freudinized angst, along the lines of repressed memories manifesting themselves in dreams. And while Lee sometimes overdoes it, his decision ultimately makes "Hulk" far more interesting than the t.v. show whose premise wore thin after a few episodes and a little more intriguing than Marvels past comic-book adaptations . However, action junkies need not fear. Things kick into high gear in the film's fast-paced and action-packed final act as Banner escapes from a military compound where they were hoping to harvest him for their own purposes. He then proceeds to tear up the california desert in a wondrously shot sequence that shows off the ILM's incredibly life-like and belivable Hulk creation and the films' unique style of editing that makes the film feel like a comic-book with skillfully juxtaposed images from various camera shots that describe various scenes that occur simaltaneously in the film.Read more ›
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Duane Thomas on September 8, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
I've been collecting comic books since I was eight years old (I'll stop when I die) so I was interested to hear Ang Lee would direct the Hulk movie. Having now seen the film, though there've been many changes made to the character's history, I feel they did a pretty darn good job capturing his essence.

First major change, Bruce no longer develops the gamma bomb for the military. I guess the writers thought it would be too difficult to build sympathy for a character who spends his days building bigger and better ways to slaughter thousands of people. Now Bruce's metamorphosis is triggered by a combination of experiments performed on him as a child by his scientist father, and a lab accident. While this may sidestep the whole issue of building sympathy for a weapons designer, we lose that overriding, powerful image of the Hulk being born at the heart of a nuclear bomb blast.

In the comics, Bruce's father was even more of a monster than in the movie. Bruce Banner was a seriously abused child - we're talking his entire childhood was a living hell of physical/emotional abuse, and watching the same delivered upon his mother. In the movie, though the father experiments upon his son, and eventually, accidentally kills his wife, versus Bruce's comics father - who beat his wife to death, and it was NOT an accident - he's comparatively decent.

Of course, that doesn't make him a nice guy. Nick Nolte was an inspired choice to play the father. Even his good guys are psycho a-holes. Give him a character who's a psycho a-hole to start with and he really goes to town.
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