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The Hurried Child-25th Anniversary Edition Paperback – Deluxe Edition, December 26, 2006


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The Hurried Child-25th Anniversary Edition + The Power of Play: Learning What Comes Naturally + Miseducation: Preschoolers at Risk
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press; 25th Anniversary Edition edition (December 26, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 073821082X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0738210827
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 6.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #87,524 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Wall Street Journal, 9/4
“[The first book to] mourn the loss of play and leisure time [for kids].”

Washington Post, 11/5/09
“Read The Hurried Child by psychologist David Elkind. It explains the development of children so well and gives such good reasons for slowing them down that you'll want to give a copy to every parent you know.”

Washington Post, 3/12/10
“To learn more about children and how they grow, read The Hurried Child…It’s one of the great classics of parenthood.”
 
The Jewish Week, 6/23/10
“If you want to know more about the harmful effects of micro-managing our children’s lives, read The Hurried Child…[Elkind’s] main theme remains relevant more than 25 years after its initial publishing.”

About the Author

David Elkind, Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus at Tufts University and the author of a dozen books, including The Hurried Child and All Grown Up and No Place to Go. He lives outside of Boston and on Cape Cod.

More About the Author

Brief Resume
David Elkind

David Elkind is currently Professor emeritus of Child Development at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. He was formerly Professor of Psychology, Psychiatry and Education at the University of Rochester. Professor Elkind obtained his doctorate at U.C.L.A. and then spent a year as David Rapaport's research assistant at the Austen Riggs Center in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. In 1964 65 he was a National Science Foundation Senior Postdoctoral Fellow at Piaget's Institut d' Epistemologie Genetique in Geneva. His research has been in the areas of perceptual, cognitive and social development where he has attempted to build upon the research and theory of Jean Piaget.

Professor Elkind's bibliography now numbers over five \hundred items and includes research, theoretical articles, book chapters and eighteen books. In addition he has published more popular pieces such as children's stories in Jack and Jill, biographies of famous psychologists in the New York Times Magazine, as well as presentations of his own work in journals such as Good Housekeeping, Parade and Psychology Today. Some of his recent articles include Computers and Young Children, The Authority of the Brain, The Cosmopolitan School, On Becoming a Grandfather, and Thanks for the Memory: Froebel and Montessori. Perhaps Professor Elkind is best known for his popular books, The Hurried Child, All Grown Up and No Place to Go, Miseducation, Ties that Stress and most recently The Power of Play: Learning what comes naturally. In preparation is a new book tentatively entitled, The Stages of Parenthood: Growing up with Our Children.

Professor Elkind is a member of many professional organizations, is on the Editorial Board of numerous scientific journals, is a consultant to state education departments, as well as to government agencies and private foundations. He lectures extensively in the United States, Canada and abroad. He has appeared on The Today Show, The CBS Morning News, Twenty/Twenty, Nightline, Donahue, and the Oprah Winfrey Show. He has been profiled in People and Boston Magazine and was a Contributing Editor to Parents Magazine. Professor Elkind also co-hosted the Lifetime television series, Kids These Days. He is a past President of the National Association for the Education of Young Children. Professor Elkind is currently the chief scientific advisor for JustAskBaby, and internet service for parents.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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I found it to be very dated, wordy and opinionated.
Beth A. Corum
Our children are the future and we must allow them to be real kids, to explore and learn and discover, to simply play and experience.
CJD
This book should be required reading for all parents.
BJV

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 36 people found the following review helpful By K. H. Lam on October 26, 2008
Format: Paperback
"The Hurried Child-Growing Up Too Fast Too Soon"
A book review by: Katie H. Lam

Today's child is ever "hurried" through childhood. It is important that as parents and educators that we are knowledgeable and understanding of the development of the child. This book analyzes the ways that America as a society is pressuring youth for early intellectual achievement in this notion of being fast paced for success earlier and earlier. Elkind's book is divided into a three main sections-a preface that includes updated information on societal changes since his original publication in 1981, Part I-Our Hurried Children, and Part II-Hurried Children: Stressed Children.
In the preface the author offers a discussion on current topics such as the "Internet", "Lapware", and Britney Spears and the impact on our youth. He states that in twenty years we have hurried our children and teens more and more.
In Part I of the book the author analyzes the dynamics of what areas of society hurry our children from parents, schools, the media, and technology (Lapware and the Internet). The author states that the majority of the factors are coming down through changes in adult society. He discusses that children are hurried from the time of conception with new technology that speed up learning processes in the womb. The author also looks in this portion of the book what the media does to hurry our children through the television programming available twenty four hours a day specifically aimed at them. Elkind states that parents and society try to accelerate a child's early acquisition of skills and abilities through summer educational programs, children's fashions that mimic adults dress, and the use of adult behavior and language. He also looks at what and how a parent's stress reflects upon children.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By T. Haring on October 30, 2011
Format: Paperback
The moment I read this excerpt, I was immediately drawn in, "Our new conception of children and youth is epitomized in the metaphor of the Superkid. Like Superman, Superkid has spectacular powers and precocious competence even as an infant. This allows us to think that we can hurry the little powerhouse with impunity . . . The conception of children as competent to deal with, and indeed as benefiting from, everything and anything that life has to offer was an effective rationalization for parents who continue to love their children but who have neither the time, nor the energy, for childhood . . . Our contemporary conception of Superkid, then . . . must be seen as a social invention to alleviate parental anxiety and guilt."

It took me five months to read this book and it was worth every moment. Not everyone will share Elkind's opinions about childhood, but I certainly do. I appreciate seeing even the small ways we can hurry our children and rob them of their childhood, so that I can avoid making those mistakes. I plan to regularly revisit this book as my children grow to reexamine how I can help them become healthy, happy adults through each stage of their development.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By E. Greenspan on June 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
This book provides research based information about the "hurrying" of today's American child. Whether you work with children, have children or even plan to have children, you should read this book. It helps one to recognize what is developmentally appropriate and inappropriate in terms of dealing with children.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By BJV on July 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
This book should be required reading for all parents. I have been a parent for 26 years, still have children in elementary school also. This book details how our hurried society and competitive parents are hurting our children.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Betty A. Hare on July 13, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is my third copy of this book. I have a first edition which I used in my teaching, years ago. I give it as presents to young parents. I think it should be required reading for all parents and teachers of young children, so say nothing of school boards, administrators, and any one involved with small children.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Peterson on May 19, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book when it first was published. I was running a pre-school at the time. It was very helpful in guiding young parents. This purchase was for my daughter, who has 2 toddlers, at her request. This book is even more important today than when it was written. We are living in a time now where parents are even more competitive that in the 80's and we are stealilng childhood from children.
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By Jette Rygaard on July 10, 2014
Format: Paperback
very good
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By Brittany Stichter on May 16, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I think the book had some good points, but I think he could have written it much more concisely. We read it for a child psychology class at college, and the concepts fit well with the class. Because the author says some things too many times or in overly many words, we were not assigned (and thus I did not read) the entire book, but I did appreciate some of what the author said about different things.
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