The Iliad (Penguin Classics) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.00
  • Save: $3.37 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Solid used copy with visible wear. FREE SHIPPING w/AMAZON PRIME!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Iliad Paperback – April 29, 2003


See all 16 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.63
$6.11 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

The Iliad + The Odyssey (Penguin Classics)
Price for both: $21.54

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; Revised edition (April 29, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140447946
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140447941
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 1 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #76,381 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, Greek (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Homer is thought to have lived c.750-700 BC in Ionia and is believed to be the author of the earliest works of Western Literature: The Odyssey and The Iliad. E V Rieu was a celebrated translator from Latin and Greek, and editor of Penguin Classics from 1944-64. His son, D C H Rieu, has revised his work. Peter Jones is former lecturer in Classics at Newcastle. He co-founded the 'Friends of Classics' society and is the editor of their journal and a columnist for The Spectator.

More About the Author

Homer was probably born around 725BC on the Coast of Asia Minor, now the coast of Turkey, but then really a part of Greece. Homer was the first Greek writer whose work survives.

He was one of a long line of bards, or poets, who worked in the oral tradition. Homer and other bards of the time could recite, or chant, long epic poems.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

(What's this?)

Customer Reviews

I can't say I'm surprised; I'd read The Odyssey from the same translator and loved it.
ZC
I sometimes find reading epic poems in their poetic form distracting so the prose translation was perfect for me.
Andy Beck
This of course is the story of Achilles, Helen, Agamemmnon, Odysseus, Hector and Paris.
Keith G

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 58 people found the following review helpful By T. Bachman on September 30, 2005
Format: Paperback
The Iliad is an intoxicating masterpiece, and well worth reading. I read it with my kids over the course of a year and all of us were totally captivated.

I have compared a pretty good number of translations with each other trying to ascertain which was most faithful, and I disagree with the reviewer on here who puts this translation down the list a ways. I think this is the best translation for the general reader. The Lattimore is a fairly difficult go; the Fagles is an easy enough read but has the disadvantage of not being all that faithful to the original. For the average person, I think the Rieu/Jones is the best. It combines fidelity to the original with a graceful comprehensibility.

Good luck.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
82 of 92 people found the following review helpful By Christopher H. Hodgkin on August 31, 2004
Format: Paperback
The Iliad is a magnificent poem, and has, appropriately, been translated numerous times. Rieu's translation is a somewhat older translation, and it is showing its age.

Whatever your desires, there are better translations.

If you want the poem in poetic form that most closely tracks the majesty and glory of the original, choose either the Lattimore or the more difficult to find Fitzgerald translations. Lattimore is the more generally preferred translation for scholars who don't read Homer in the original Greek.

If you want a more colloquial version, but one that still brings poetic grandeur to the poem, choose the newer Fagles translation.

If you want an easier to read, prose translation that doesn't have to adapt its language to the poetic form, Butler's translation is probably your best bet.

If you want the most literally accurate translation, you could choose the Loeb Classical Library edition, though it is more costly and in several volumes -- it has the Greek on the left page and the translation on the right, and because it is designed to assist Greek students with their translation it tends to be the most literal translation.

But for the most Homeric experience outside of reading it in Greek, the Lattimore translation is the way to go. It is a bit more difficult than Fagles or Butler, but worth the effort.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
31 of 35 people found the following review helpful By GG Gawain on February 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
I have read all other translations of Homer's Iliad, including Alexander Pope's and Fagles, and can unequivocally say that E.V. Rieu's translation is the most readable and forceful. It reads like a novel, not iambic pentameter verse, and therefore is more enriching to the modern 21st century reader.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Ryan Kouroukis on September 3, 2008
Format: Paperback
Rieu's pioneering Iliad of 1950 brought Homer to millions, it was constantly re-published throughout the decades...

...but in 2002 it was revised by Peter Jones and Rieu's son. This time taking away much of E.V. Rieu's lovely poetic storytelling genius and a lot of the original "Joie de Vivre".

Not only that but there are constant interferences all throughout the book...I mean in the middles of the text! References, side notes, top notes, bottom notes, summaries etc. interrupt the flow of the revised translation. They may be useful to intellectuals but overall I find them very annoying.

Please take a look at the two versions (original and revised). As well as recommending Rieu's "oringal", I also resommend Stanley Lombardo's powerful, accurate, and incredibly poetic translation of the Iliad on a publishing company called Hackett.

*** I think Rieu's original Iliad in Penguin's re-release from the 60's and 70's (with the colorful covers and spines) is the most attractive and the most successful. Amazon Marketplace sellers have tons, or you can find them easily at used bookshops around the nation.***
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Andy Beck on January 16, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book was great. I sometimes find reading epic poems in their poetic form distracting so the prose translation was perfect for me. The introduction was brief and general, which is nice in a book that some would call long and difficult. Other than that, one of the greatest stories of all time. The only person I would steer away from this particular version of The Iliad is someone looking for a poetic translation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mark Twain on April 7, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a great prose translation, updated and modernized by Peter Jones. The text crackles with energy and is much better than many verse translations (my favorite verse translations are by Lombardo and Lattimore). Many people - like myself - have an eye that is more comfortable with prose and modern English prose is very expressive. So this is probably a very good translation for most people. If you don't mind verse, try the fresh translation by Stanley Lombardo.

As for the story itself, what is there to say? It's a classic and, interestingly enough, is the first piece of written literature that introduces us to the ancient Greek gods and goddesses. But it is the story of Achilles and his anger (or rage), first at the Greek leader, Agammenon, and then at Hector and the Trojans. The latter kill Achilles' best friend, Patrokles.

I don't think anyone interested in the Iliad will find fault with this lively translation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By bernie HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 1, 2009
Format: Paperback
With many books, translations are negligible, with two obvious exceptions, one is the Bible, and surprisingly the other is The Iliad. Each translation can give a different insight and feel to the story. Everyone will have a favorite. I have several.

For example:

"Rage--Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus' son Achilles,
Murderous, doomed, that cost the Achaeans countless losses,
hurling down to the House of Death so many souls,
great fighters' souls. But made their bodies carrion,
feasts for dogs and birds,
and the will of Zeus was moving towards its end.
Begin, Muse, when the two first broke and clashed,
Agamemnon lord of men and brilliant Achilles."
-Translated by Robert Fagles

"Sing, O Goddess, the anger of Achilles, son of Peleus, that brought countless ills upon the Achaeans. Many a brave soul did it send hurrying down to Hades, and many a heroes did it yield a prey to dogs and vultures for so were the counsels of Zeus fulfilled from the day on which the son of Atreus, king of men, and great Achilles first fell out with one another."
-Translated by Samuel Butler

"Rage:
Sing, Goddess, Achilles' rage,
Black and murderous, that cost the Greeks
Incalculable pain pitched countless souls
Of heroes into Hades' dark,
And let their bodies rot as feasts
For dogs and birds, as Zeus' will was done.
Begin with the clash between Agamemnon--
The Greek Warlord--and godlike Achilles.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?